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NYC is now the second most expensive U.S. city to live in

NYC is now the second most expensive U.S. city to live in
Photograph: Courtesy CC/Flickr/numbphoto

The greatest city in the world is also the most expensive city in the world (almost). According to a new study by Nested, NYC comes in second place on the list of U.S. cities with the highest average rent. The average monthly rent for a single person in NYC is $1,994, and the only city that topped that is San Francisco at $2,077. So don’t move to California yet, people.

 

In order to afford your own place in NYC, the annual income for a single person would have to be above $82,000. (The prices only get higher if you’re looking for a place for a family.) If you seriously want to save some dough, avoid the most expensive NYC neighborhoods. Or just move to Detroit, where the average rent is less than a quarter of NYC rent and you’ll never find an $18 cup of coffee.

 

Check out the top 10 most expensive cities below, with average rental prices for a single person:

 

1. San Francisco, $2,077

2. New York City, $1,994

3. Boston, $1,721

4. Washington, D.C., $1,397

5. Seattle, $1,288

6. Los Angeles, $1,200

7. Miami, $1,192

8. Chicago, $1,045

9. Houston, $625

10. Detroit, $457

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Comments

5 comments
T D

Who exactly is taking these rental polls in Houston? Way off! $625.00, HA! Maybe in 1990...

Cynthia B

New Jersey should be in there top 3 or 4 for us living close to NYC it's just as much.

pee_elle

"So don’t move to California yet, people."


Yes, San Francisco is the only city in California. Los Angeles doesn't exist, oh wait, its even on this list. You suck at your job. 

Kyle S

"The greatest city in the world is also the most expensive city in the world (almost)."  

You are aware that the world is larger than just the United States, no?