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Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Bond

The five best affordable apartments in NYC (week of November 24)

At about $1,000 per person, these New York City abodes—scattered across Manhattan and Brooklyn—are worth the money

Written by
Carolyn Stanley
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New York City is a tough place to find an apartment. People panic about not getting enough for their money, which is why we take a weekly look at what it’s possible to get in this town for about $1,000 a person. (And we promise, there won’t be a nightmare apartment listing.) No one wants to end up in the world’s most depressing apartment, but not everyone has the cash to pay for the kind of place Obama could afford to rent if he moves to New York. So take a look at these affordable apartments in NYC but do so quickly because they will be gone before you know it. Come back next week for more of our top picks from real estate site Zumper’s inventory. And if you’re still struggling, try our NYC apartments guide.

RECOMMENDED: A full guide to affordable apartments in NYC

Affordable apartments in NYC

Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Miron Properties

E 3rd St #E

Three-bedroom in the East Village, $3,500/month ($1,167 per person)

Reasonably spacious digs in the East Village for a not-exorbitant price? You’re looking at it. The tradeoff is that you’re pretty far east (read: a hike to the subway), but that’s a pill we’re willing to swallow when it comes with gorgeous parquet floors, in-unit laundry (along with a building laundry room, weirdly) and a roof deck.

Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Miron Properties

E 3rd St #E

Three-bedroom in the East Village, $3,500/month ($1,167 per person)

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Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Miron Properties

E 3rd St #E

Three-bedroom in the East Village, $3,500/month ($1,167 per person)

Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Caliber Associates

E 50th St #2C

Three-bedroom in Midtown, $3,420/month ($1,140 per person)

Judging by vigorous use of asterisks in the listing, you do not want to snooze on this East Side spot. To be fair, it does look pretty nice, with a freshly renovated airy layout, a sleek kitchen with loads of cabinet space and a dishwasher, and plenty of natural light.

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Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Caliber Associates

E 50th St #2C

Three-bedroom in Midtown, $3,420/month ($1,140 per person)

Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Caliber Associates

E 50th St #2C

Three-bedroom in Midtown, $3,420/month ($1,140 per person)

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Photograph: Courtesy Zumper

29-28 41st Ave #1105

Three-bedroom in Long Island City, $3,300/month ($1,100 per person)

The sheer size of this Queens loft looks like something out of an unrealistic sitcom (looking at you, Friends), but the perks don’t stop there: Along with lofted ceilings, hardwood floors, tons of windows and a view of the Empire State Building, the complex is equipped with a pool—a rarity even for fictitious New Yorkers.

Photograph: Courtesy Zumper

29-28 41st Ave #1105

Three-bedroom in Long Island City, $3,300/month ($1,100 per person)

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Photograph: Courtesy Zumper

29-28 41st Ave #1105

Three-bedroom in Long Island City, $3,300/month ($1,100 per person)

Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Bond

1st Ave & East 73rd St

Two-bedroom on the Upper East Side, $2,350/month ($1,175 per person)

Charm comes standard at this uptown abode, with accent walls of exposed brick, adorable French doors and good sun exposure. On the practical side, there’s ample closet space, a spacious kitchen and a dishwasher, plus a prime location a stone’s throw from the nabe’s bars and restaurants.

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Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Bond

1st Ave & East 73rd St

Two-bedroom on the Upper East Side, $2,350/month ($1,175 per person)

Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Bond

1st Ave & East 73rd St

Two-bedroom on the Upper East Side, $2,350/month ($1,175 per person)

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Photograph: Courtesy Zumper/Aptsandlofts.com

329 Lincoln Pl #3L

Four-bedroom in Prospect Heights, $4,675/month ($1,169 per person)

Between its awesome location (a mere block from Prospect Park and smack in the middle of the ’hood’s copious eateries), in-unit washer and dryer, marble-tiled bathrooms and pretty much brand-new everything, we’re not really sure how this Brooklyn pad is still available. Get to it, people!

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