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Kayla Levy

Kayla Levy

Articles (16)

4 Tel Aviv comic book shops to unleash your inner geek at

4 Tel Aviv comic book shops to unleash your inner geek at

With seemingly everyone in the White City preoccupied with being hip, we often overlook the few brave Tel Avivians still following unconventional - albeit, nerdy - pursuits. For those of you out there that haven’t succumbed to the Wi-Fi-dependent, party-and-brunching ways of Tel Aviv, we applaud you, and offer an unconventional list of places to find the Bible of geeks: comic books! From classic storefront locations in the city center with walls and aisles of books you’ll want to take to a bookstore café, to an online shop selling anime apparel so that you can act out your greatest fantasies, these comic book destinations making it in the 21st-century remind us that not all heroes wear capes.

Places to eat in Jerusalem that are relevant to Jewish history

Places to eat in Jerusalem that are relevant to Jewish history

Whereas opportunities to connect with Jerusalem’s storied past through historic tours or museum visits are commonplace, these eateries allow you to engage with the Holy City’s history through a different sense: taste. Dine on a menu inspired by flavors of the Bible, eat a meal in the room where the Israel-Jordan peace treaty was signed, or grab a bite at the café at the heart of the secular, Zionist literary movement. These spots combine the delicious flavors and years of history of a city whose significance extends throughout the timeline of humanity.

Best eateries in Mahane Yehuda Market

Best eateries in Mahane Yehuda Market

There's nothing like shouting, pushing, and bargaining to work up an appetite, so lucky for locals and travelers alike, Mahane Yehuda Market is teeming with eateries to get you through any shopping or touring experience. Dig in to any meal of the day – including midnight drinks and snacks – at spots ranging from sit down restaurants to pita-on-the-go eateries. There are international flavors from Georgia and Yemen, classic Middle Eastern style fare, and pastries that are savory or sweet. Don’t just feast your eyes on the stalls of fresh produce and assortment of sweets, fill your stomach with some of the freshest bites in Jerusalem.

Places to makeout in Tel Aviv

Places to makeout in Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv is Israel’s self-proclaimed city of love–sure, Paris has dimly lit winding streets and romantic appeal, but Tel Aviv has an alcohol-infused culture and unabashed local nature. From beaches and parks to bars and movie theaters, (almost) anywhere in the White City is fair game to get cozy or go in for a kiss. Whether it’s the month of Tu B’av–Israel’s very own Valentine's Day–or a weekday in October, head to any of these spots for a good ol’ tongues-down-each-others'-throats makeout sesh.

"Unplugged": 10 places in Israel to get away from the wifi

"Unplugged": 10 places in Israel to get away from the wifi

It’s time to rescue yourself from the constant stream of Whatsapp notifications and properly escape from technology. From a popular Tel Aviv club with a strict no-phone policy to a small ecological village in the Western Galilee off the national electricity grid, return to a simpler time and find some freedom of self beyond the constant search for free wifi.

Must-visit Jerusalem restaurants at The First Station

Must-visit Jerusalem restaurants at The First Station

When the Jerusalem Railway Station opened in 1892, it included a two-story stone building, a mechanism to change the train’s direction, and a large water tank. Over 100 years – and one major renovation – later, The First Station has become a central location in the entertainment and dining scene in Jerusalem. With restaurants serving up fresh international flavors, favorites from notable Israeli chefs, and an array of Kosher offerings, the complex attracts hungry diners looking for an Asian bite or Italian meal. Stop by to fill your stomach and feast your eyes on years of history.

The Best Bars Inside Jerusalem’s Mahane Yehuda Market

The Best Bars Inside Jerusalem’s Mahane Yehuda Market

When the sun sets in Jerusalem’s legendary Mahane Yehuda Market, and the fruit and vegetable stalls close for the day, an array of local bars begin to open up around the Shuk. Some serve tasty plates and sides, others have Israeli breweries on tap, and a few host live music, but all are guaranteed to fulfill your nightlife needs. Let go of your preconceived notions of Jerusalem’s culture, and check out some of the most magical bars in the ancient city.

The spirit of South Tel Aviv: Shapira neighborhood

The spirit of South Tel Aviv: Shapira neighborhood

After spending a day between the beach and Mike’s Place, or a night at the hippest bars in the Kerem, it’s easy to forget that Tel Aviv is not only city center. Just beyond the streets of Rothschild and Florentin lies Shapira, one of the most diverse neighborhood in South Tel Aviv. Shapira is home to people of many ages, races, and religions, which contributes to its array of cultural offerings and strong social consciousness. Whether you’re visiting a collaborative art gallery, seeking authentic Chinese or Bukharian food, or need some green space, it’s all a few minutes walk away. Next time you’re on your way to the New Central Bus Station or want a respite from Florentin, stop by!

How do you like them apples? : 14 alternative ways to get your Rosh Hashanah 'apples and honey' fix

How do you like them apples? : 14 alternative ways to get your Rosh Hashanah 'apples and honey' fix

For Jewish families across the world, 'apples and honey' only means one thing: Rosh Hashanah. But instead of welcoming in 5778 by simply dipping your apples into the ooey-gooey stuff, think outside the fruit-and-nectar box. From urban beekeeping in Jerusalem to honey spa treatments in the Galilee, in the land of milk, honey and forbidden Biblical fruit, the options for celebration are far more than what meets the eye. 

Unconventional summer festivals this August

Unconventional summer festivals this August

Just when you thought you recovered from Midburn, festival season is back - but with some non-traditional twists. These events still encourage dancing, drinking, and a damn good time, but come August, expect the unconventional: hot air balloons in the desert, sacred Israeli art and music across Jerusalem, and klezmer throughout the streets of Tzfat. From folk dancing in the north to Afro-Israeli art and music in the south, quirky live entertainment is abound this August, and not just in Tel Aviv! If liquor is the only entertainment you need, beer and wine festivals are coming to parks, museums, and train-station-turned-trendy-shopping-complexes in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. Between animated films one weekend, and puppet theater the next, taking in the cross-country festivities might leave you exhausted, but we guarantee you'll remember it all (or at least most of it).

August events worth the drive

August events worth the drive

With endless free wifi, the hippest cafés, and nightlife, and sites to keep you occupied for days, some might question why you would ever leave Tel Aviv. However, this August use your final carefree days of summer to think outside the box, and explore events happening all around the country. In the north, music, sports, and art, are coming to Haifa, while weekend culture festivals take over Karmiel and Tiberias. In the south, there will be Afro-Israeli music and art in a hip Mitzpe Ramon hostel, as hot air balloons fill the Negev sky. From the lesser-explored cities of Zichron Yaakov to Akko, we guarantee that wherever your travels take you, these happening events will be well worth the drive.

7 fun things to do in Israel as you mourn the end of summer

7 fun things to do in Israel as you mourn the end of summer

As August turns into September, the temperature and humidity stay at an all time high, tourists are abound, and the seemingly never-ending festival season continues across Israel. Although you might just miss it as summer becomes fall, there’s a subtle change of pace in the Holy Land that can leave even the most air-condition deprived Israelis yearning for the lazy-hazy-crazy days of summer. So instead of falling into a summertime sadness spend a night watching an awe-inspiring dance performance, commemorating the lost days of your youth, or (finally) getting that start-up off the ground. We can’t guarantee it will bring back your summer vibes, but we promise you’ll get out of that September slump–at least for a night.

Listings and reviews (1)

AnonymX: The End of the Privacy Era

AnonymX: The End of the Privacy Era

“AnonymX: The End of the Privacy Era” is a cutting edge cluster of exhibitions examining the complicated nature of privacy, specifically in an increasingly Orwellian, post 9/11 era. The five solo and six group exhibitions are divided into three chapters on voyeurism, celebrity, and surveillance, each of which explores the vanishing barrier between the public and private spheres. Complete with pieces on security cameras, constant cell phone use, and powerful data surveillance, the exhibit captures the modern-day phenomena of constantly being recorded and photographed–and constantly recording and photographing. The exhibition has reached critical acclaim since its February opening, so stop by before it closes on August 19.   Read more about the exhibit here.

News (37)

Hip-hop festival in the Holy Land comes to Ashdod

Hip-hop festival in the Holy Land comes to Ashdod

There have been cocktail, indie music, and hot air balloon festivals in Israel before, but this June will feature the second year of the ever hip-hop festival in the Holy Land.   The first week in June, professionals and enthusiasts alike will gather in Ashdod to celebrate five elements of hip-hop culture at the VAV festival: graffiti, DJing, rap, beatbox and dance. © Sivan Aharon Throughout the three days, free workshops will be held with options for the whole family, from children’s flash mobs to breakdancing lessons–for professional hip-hoppers, master classes will be held the Wednesday before the festival from 10:00-15:00 with advance registration.   In addition to opportunities to learn tricks of the hip-hop trade, VAV will feature performances by groups such as Peled and KGC, a street art party, and national competitions. Put in some headphones on the train or blast hip-hop jams in your car as you head to Ashdod to make hip-hop history in Israel.   © Sivan Aharon   The VAV festival will be held in Ashdod's VAV district on Dov Gour street from June 5-7. Visit the VAV website for more information on the dates and times of festival events.

Tips and tricks for cheating the Tel Avivian restaurant system

Tips and tricks for cheating the Tel Avivian restaurant system

Tel Aviv restaurants are many things, but cheap is not one of them. When even a meal at the “local” café or drinks at the grungiest of Florentin bars sets you back a paycheck, it’s time to reconsider your restaurant habits. Make the most of your next meal out with these tips and tricks for cheating the ever-hip, ever-expensive Tel Avivian restaurant system.   Order a child size. Who cares that you’re 20-something, young at heart counts for something… right? Many sweet establishments, namely Tamara, have the (unpublished!) option to opt for a smaller size at a few shekels less. So let go of your pride and ask about a child’s size–it’s not like they’ll know that your parents still do your taxes for you.       Grab a bottomless bread basket for the road. Nothing says brunch like a bread basket, especially when it's bottomless and from Benedicts. So next time you’re getting ready to leave, ask for a free refill and feast again tomorrow morning.       Maximize on the free side dishes. Since salads and spreads are a staple at most falafel and shawarma places, make the most of your NIS 25 meal by taking home NIS 50 worth of Israeli salads. For a more on-trend option, opt for something smaller and 'carb-free' from the menu at Miznon (roasted cauliflower anyone?) and fill up on the bounty of cabbage, tahini, and 'free-carbs.'     Munch on bar snacks. Olives at Hoodna, sunflower seeds at Tepale, and salty-spicy mix at Uganda–need I say more? Ignore the looks of judgment, and o

Barr Yaron, the true woman behind the Women of Startup Nation (WOSN)

Barr Yaron, the true woman behind the Women of Startup Nation (WOSN)

Despite interning at the White House and Wall Street, working in the Silicon Valley tech industry, and even conducting digital strategy for Beyonce’s team, Barr Yaron always dreamed of living in Israel. This year the Philadelphia born Israeli moved to the Startup Nation for a career at Facebook–and a little more shakshuka. When she’s not working, dancing, or watching beach sunsets, Yaron is interviewing incredible technologists for her Women of Startup Nation (WOSN).   What prompted your interest in working in the high-tech industry?   In college I studied what I loved without focusing too much on industry–mostly theoretical classes in math, computer science, and economics. Solving problems in these fields felt like cracking fun and challenging puzzles. Professionally, I knew I wanted to make an impact. The tech industry is unlike any other, and it touches every part of our lives. Technology requires interesting and challenging problem-solving, but its applications are broad and, when applied carefully, can improve the world.   What was your inspiration for creating the Women of Startup Nation Facebook page? At my going away party in San Francisco, I was surprised to hear my friends’ questions: is there a tech scene in Israel? Will moving to Israel hurt your career? What’s the role of women there? I made a mental note when I moved here to learn as much as possible about Startup Nation and the gender dynamics within it, and so I founded this page, inspired by similar ones in S

Top five people you’ll meet on an El Al flight

Top five people you’ll meet on an El Al flight

1. The religious man What seems like merely an aircraft for some, is actually a living room, kitchen, and shul for these passengers. The black hats and religious garb are telltale signs of the flight experience to come – complete with discussions about life in an ever-changing Williamsburg and periodic congregations in the rear for prayers (God does not always coordinate with the FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELT sign). Should religious controversy arise, remember: why would it be reasonable to expect Israel’s national airline to be any more capable of dealing with theological disputes than the country itself? After all, “it’s not just an airline, it’s Israel!” 2. The overly concerned traveler While everyone around them is trying to stuff a slightly oversized carry-on into the slightly undersized overhead compartment or herd their many children into seats, this person has become a self proclaimed Mossad agent. Last night, they dove deep into the recesses of the internet, and in short, things are not looking good. The four rounds of security did little-to-nothing to assuage their anxiety and clearly, no one can be trusted. The person with the blood shot eyes and single carry on is probably just exhausted from international travel, right? Maybe I should play it safe and alert a flight attendant just in case. 3. The Birthright bunch Regardless of where you are seated, you’ll hear this group before you see them. The telltale sounds of superlative conver

Dance the last night of 5777 away with this year's Boombox Festival

Dance the last night of 5777 away with this year's Boombox Festival

As Israel gets ready to welcome in 5778, they’re throwing it back with a festival bearing a 90’s inspired name – the Boombox Festival.   This annual event promises a night of back-to-back performances from some of Israel’s most upbeat dance-until-you-can't-feel-your-feet bands. Throughout the course of the night over 15 artists will take to the stage, including legendary electronic duo Infected Mushroom, rapper Tuna, and singer Avraham Tal.   © Ohad Romano           The festival began as a partnership between Zappa and the city of Hadera, with the intention of bringing contemporary Israeli music to large audiences, and has been held at the waterside venue of Hadera Stream Park ever since.   In an attempt to make the music accessible, the festival boasts less expensive tickets than similar style events, and public transportation options from all across the country.   Head to this year's Boombox Festival for a night of contemporary Israeli grooves starting at 21:00 and ending when you can’t sing, dance, or stand anymore.   © Guy Kushi & Yariv Fein         The Boombox Festival is on September 19, beginning at 21:00 and ending when there is no one left standing. Tickets range from NIS 164-244 with discounted options for soldiers. Check out the website for more information on tickets and transportation.

The Gordon Gallery pays homage to French-American artist Louise Bourgeois

The Gordon Gallery pays homage to French-American artist Louise Bourgeois

Gordon Gallery’s Jaffa location will reopen from their summer vacation with “Pink Days / Blue Days”–a solo-exhibition of French-American artist Louise Bourgeois.   The exhibition, concurrent with Bourgeois’ solo show “Twosome” at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, features the prints, painting, and sculptures which she crafted over the seven decades of her career.   Girl With Hair, 2007, by Louise Bourgeois © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, NY         Bourgeois was not formally identified with any single artistic movement, but her prolific works paralleled abstract expressionism and surrealism, and explored themes of femininity, sexuality, and the body.     “Pink Days / Blue Days” stems from a sculpture of the same name that features garments hanging from a steel pole, and–like the rest of the exhibition, and many of her works–contrasts themes of femininity and happiness with melancholy.   The exhibition mainly features prints she produced during the last years of her life, but also includes several silkscreens drawings of the female figure, and drypoint paintings of nature.   Photo: Alex Van Gelder Art © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, NY         A second exhibition of her prints will open at the Museum of Modern Art in New York this September, but catch them first in the more intimate setting of the Gordon Gallery.   Gordon Gallery is located at 6 Hapelech St, Tel Aviv. Tue-Thu 11:00-18:00, Fri 10:00-14:00, and Sat 10:00-13:00. For more information call: 03-524

Top five people who visit you in Israel

Top five people who visit you in Israel

1. Your parents From the minute they touch down in Natbag, the pictures, questions, and demands don’t stop: Let’s have someone take a family photo in front of your office! What do you mean you don’t have health insurance yet? Call my friend Barbara’s son, you need to find a nice Jewish boy. There’s no escaping these visitors, but after an all-expense paid trip to Taizu and a joyous reunion with your childhood pillow that they stuffed in a carry on, would you even want to?   2. Your cousin’s ex-boyfriend’s best friend No one in your family knows how they found out you were in Israel, or got your phone number, but this unlikely visitor is messaging you as though you’ve met far more times than that one Hanukkah party. Sure, you have 55 mutual friends on Facebook, but does that mean they should crash on your couch for a week? Why not–it wouldn’t be Israel without a little combina.   3. Your long-lost Birthright friends This sunburnt, hungover group of pals just made an impulse decision to extend their Birthright trip, and despite not talking since college, are ready for 10 more days of fun courtesy of you. Good luck explaining that yes, you have a full time job, and no, you won’t go to Shalvata. It’s all fun and games catching up, until someone throws up on your floor.   4. Your best camp friend Counting down the days doesn’t even begin to explain this reunion when you’ve been planning to meet up in the Holy Land since the seventh grade. From one Happy Hour to the next, and all

The Secret Life of Bee(keeper)s: an interview with Yossi Aud

The Secret Life of Bee(keeper)s: an interview with Yossi Aud

Aud lets us in on the bees’ connection to honey, cities, and the human condition.   Fifteen stories above the heart of Jerusalem, Propolis is bringing new life—in the form of thousands of honeybees—to the Holy City. For Yossi Aud, this biodynamic urban beekeeping facility is a manifestation of his life’s passion: bees. Aud has traveled the world studying natural beekeeping practices, and now he brings all of his expertise to Propolis.   How did you begin your work?   I didn’t choose this job, the bees came to me. Years ago, many bees came to my garden - thousands every day! I became interested in them and began to learn about them, and it just clicked. I started to learn about biodynamic beekeeping in Berlin, Holland, and England.    What is biodynamic beekeeping?    Biodynamic beekeeping is a method for people to keep bees almost the same way as in nature. We let them live as naturally as possible, and we can take a little from the spare honey. Nature is like this - give and take. When people usually think about beekeepers, they immediately think about people going to take honey from the bees. I keep bees, but I’m not a beekeeper because I don’t take honey from our bees. Propolis is about returning the disappearing honey bees to cities and environments through biodynamic beekeeping. © Yossi Aud   What do you think is the most interesting fact about bees?    Bees bring us most of the abundance in the world. They give us most of our plant growth through pollination, and i

5 holiday drinking games to get through the Jewish holidays

5 holiday drinking games to get through the Jewish holidays

1. Rosh Hashanah Welcome in 5778 the only way a Jewish family knows how to–with lots of food, chutzpah, and liquor. All New Year's resolutions about less lashon harah (did you see what Adam’s new girlfriend was wearing at Shul?) and only eating low-fat-cruelty-free food will fall to the wayside with the first bites of buttery kugel and brisket, so it’s time to start drinking every time one of the following happens:   a) For every invasive question about your relationship status, chug your glass of wine b) When a member of the family gives a cringe-worthy political comment, top off that scotch c) An equally cringe-worthy comment shutting down political discussions? Take a shot!   2. Yom Kippur Whether your biggest sin of the year is that time you showed up to your grandparent’s Shabbat dinner hungover, or your decision to not fast this Yom Kippur, keep track of all your transgressions during the 15–more like 2–hours you're at synagogue, and then drink one glass of wine for each wrongdoing at your break-fast meal. A (mostly) full day of no food, unbrushed teeth and awkward (halitosis heavy) interactions with family friends, plus alcohol, always equals a good idea–right? At the very least it will help you get started on next year's list of transgressions.   3. Sukkot This festival of booths might be the little sister to the High Holidays, but really it’s a hipster event in the making. So what you couldn’t make it to Midburn? Now you have a full week of (semi-)obligatory sleepin

Design Museum Holon's 10th conference honors architect Zaha Hadid

Design Museum Holon's 10th conference honors architect Zaha Hadid

For the 10th year, Design Museum Holon is kicking-off their design season with a day-long conference–this year honoring the life and accomplishments of Zaha Hadid, the prolific architect who died suddenly last year.   Hadid, a renowned Iraqi-British architect, was the first woman to receive the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004, and garnered many other awards throughout her career, such as the UK’s prestigious Stirling Prize and Royal Gold Medal.   Described by The Guardian as “Queen of the curve,” her notable creations like the aquatic center for the 2012 London Olympics and the Heydar Aliyev cultural center in Baku, Azerbaijan, break the conventional boundaries of architectural geometry. © Hufton + Crow       The conference in Holon will be dedicated to her legacy, and relate to the worlds of architectural planning, interior design, and fashion, which she greatly influenced.   Sessions will feature conversations with Sarah Klompas, a partner in Hadid’s office, Noa Raviv, an Israeli fashion designer influenced by Hadid’s work, and Maya Dvash, the chief curator of Design Museum Holon.   At the end of the day there will be free entrance to the “Sound in Matter and Design,” exhibit at the museum.   Pay homage to the daring vision and continued legacy of Zaha Hadid at this year's International Architecture and Design Conference.   The conference will be held at the Design Museum Holon on Friday, September 8 from 09:00-15:00. Tickets are NIS 165 in full, with discounts o

First Georgian food now Georgian dance???

First Georgian food now Georgian dance???

So you’ve sampled the best of the Georgian food offerings in Israel, but what about Georgian dance?   A quarter century after diplomatic relations were formally established between Georgia and Israel, the national dance company of Georgia is performing in Israel. Erisioni, the company whose name means “light on the hill,” are bringing their talent to three major cities in Israel over the last days of Sukkot. © PR   The company will perform “Treasures of Georgia” in Tel Aviv, Beer Sheva, and Haifa, as a part of their current international tour. Promising 100 artists, 800 costumes, a live orchestra, and 130 years of international acclaim, this performance is one not to be missed. Erisioni will perform at Amphi Park in Beer Sheva on 9/10, the Performing Arts Center in Tel Aviv on 10/10, and Congress Center in Haifa on 12/10. All performances start at 20:00. © PR  

Origami for the whole family at the Florentin Quartet

Origami for the whole family at the Florentin Quartet

The same space that welcomed the “Chaos” of Guy Aloni is now encouraging the tranquility of origami with artist Sarita Peled. The origami workshop, hosted this upcoming Sunday at the Florentin Quartet, is part of Peled’s exhibit, “The Phoenix”–an exploration of transforming the simple into something unique and new. Her exhibit is a collection of steel statues, a simple metal reimagined through her artistic work and vision, just as origami transforms what is merely paper into elaborate creative pieces. © PR The workshop will focus on folding the boat shape, and ultimately all of the different boats will be assembled into a greater piece. Entrance to the workshop is free and suitable for people of all ages–from 6 to 96–but don’t forget to register in advance, and bring a stapler, staples, and a folding mood. The origami workshop will be at the Florentin Quartet (3 Maon St, Tel Aviv) on Sunday, August 20 from 17:00-19:00. Check out their website for more details, and register in advance here.

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