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SubTerrains Bankstown Biennale

  • Art, Galleries
  1. SubTerrains Bankstown Biennale installation image
    Photograph: Supplied/SubTerrains Bankstown Biennale
  2. SubTerrains Bankstown Biennale installation image
    Photograph: Supplied/SubTerrains Bankstown Biennale
  3. SubTerrains Bankstown Biennale installation image
    Photograph: Supplied/SubTerrains Bankstown Biennale
  4. SubTerrains Bankstown Biennale installation image
    Photograph: Supplied/SubTerrains Bankstown Biennale
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Time Out says

Discover this First Nations-led artistic exploration of the Bankstown landscape

In 1933, Joe Anderson – also known as “King Burraga” – was filmed on the banks of the Georges River at Salt Pan Creek declaring a petition to the King of England calling for equal rights and justice for Indigenous Australians. Almost a century later, First Nations artists are honouring Joe’s political legacy and echoing his calls to action at Bankstown Arts Centre.

SubTerrains is this year’s theme at Bankstown Biennale. It is a First Nations and artists’ led response to local narratives of land and water and the hidden truths nestled within Bankstown’s landscape, especially Salt Pan Creek. More than 50 artists have created work – from installations to video art – responding to this year’s theme while addressing interlocking themes of land and colonisation, post-colonisation, war and migration. Expect to see work by artists such as Abdul Abdullah, Aroha Groves, Carmen Glynn-Braun, Juxta, Lucy Simpson, Paula do Prado, Nardi Simpson and more.

Running until November 26, SubTerrains is co-curated by Nicole Monks and Vandana Ram, who are hosting a suite of programs, workshops and events throughout October and November where visitors can learn more about the hidden stories and the hidden heroes.

On Thursday, November 24, there will be a talk with activist-historian Heather Goodall about the Georges River estuary communities, which will tell of the important stories of strength, resilience and commitment among those looking after the river. From Irish working-class settlers, Chinese communities to Indigenous people, the tale of those who have tried to save the river’s wetlands over the centuries runs deep. You can buy tickets to the talk here.

Want more? Check out the best art exhibitions to see in Sydney this month.

Written by
Saffron Swire

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