Film

Film reviews, festivals, special screenings and more

Every Sydney Film Prize winner will screen for the tenth anniversary
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Every Sydney Film Prize winner will screen for the tenth anniversary

Sydney Film Festival’s film prize will turn ten in 2017, and to mark the occasion all nine previous winners of the prize are getting an encore screening ahead of the festival in June

Irish Film Festival

Irish Film Festival

Emerald City gets a third season of films from the Emerald Isle

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Moonlight Cinema is selling their last tickets for $10
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Moonlight Cinema is selling their last tickets for $10

If you've been a bit 'coulda, shoulda, woulda' about checking out Moonlight Cinema now you may be finally be pushed into a 'you bet I will-a'

12 incredible true facts about David Stratton
Blog

12 incredible true facts about David Stratton

He's done more with his life than just watch movies

Guides for Sydney movie lovers

Read reviews of all the latest films
Film

Read reviews of all the latest films

Get expert opinions on the films currently in Australian cinemas 

Upcoming film festivals in Sydney
Film

Upcoming film festivals in Sydney

Attention movie buffs: add these film festivals to your diary

The best outdoor cinemas in Sydney
Film

The best outdoor cinemas in Sydney

Enjoy a movie alfresco with Time Out's guide to all the outdoor cinema seasons

The top ten Aussie films to scare off tourists
Film

The top ten Aussie films to scare off tourists

A sweaty handful of movies making Tourism Australia's job that little bit harder

More film events in Sydney

Films in cinemas now in Sydney

Beauty and the Beast
Film

Beauty and the Beast

This live-action spin on the classic Disney animation, starring Emma Watson, is lively and modern – but also honours the original film

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Loving
Film

Loving

Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga play an interracial couple and unwitting heroes of the 1960s civil rights movement in this sensible, compassionate drama

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
The Space Between Us
Film

The Space Between Us

This interplanetary romance about a Martian boy and an Earth girl is pure sentimental schlock

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
A Few Less Men
Film

A Few Less Men

The sequel to 2011's A Few Best Men reeks like a corpse left to rot in the outback

Time Out says
  • 1 out of 5 stars
The Salesman
Film

The Salesman

Asghar Farhadi's second Oscar-winning drama references Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
See more films in cinemas now

Movie lists you'll love

The 100 best comedy movies
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The 100 best comedy movies

The 50 best family movies
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The 50 best family movies

The 50 best romantic comedies
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The 50 best romantic comedies

The 100 best horror movies
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The 100 best horror movies

The 100 best romantic movies
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The 100 best romantic movies

The 100 best animated movies
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The 100 best animated movies

The best cinemas in Sydney

Hayden Orpheum Picture Palace
Film

Hayden Orpheum Picture Palace

Without doubt the grandest cinema in Sydney, Cremorne’s Art Deco picture palace is a stunning step back in time. Built in 1935 by George Kenworthy, the top theatrical architect of the period, today’s version is even glitzier than the original thanks to a $2.5-million restoration some years back by owner and local TV celeb Mike Walsh. Each of the six auditoria has its own colour scheme and decor, but the 744-seat Orpheum is the true star of the show. It even has a genuine Wurlitzer cinema organ, which rises out of a stage pit on weekend evenings complete with flashing lights and a grinning organist. Expect a mix of mainstream US, British and Australian fare, with some art-house, special presentations and the occasional cabaret show.

Ritz Cinema Randwick
Film

Ritz Cinema Randwick

With a distinctive Art Deco design restored to its former 1930s glory and an impressive sound system, the six-screen Ritz cinema is both a local landmark and an excellent venue for catching the latest mainstream releases. Signs explain the regulations – no alcohol, bare feet, smoking or skateboards – which make sense if you hit the place in the afternoon after school’s out. In the evening the place attracts a different crowd, including film geeks who seek out the Ritz for its great acoustics and old-fashioned flair. Upstairs the inimitable Bar Ritz boasts a marble bar and balcony – perfect for pre- and post-film drinks. Bus 372, 373, 376, 377.

Palace Norton Street Cinemas
Film

Palace Norton Street Cinemas

Leichhardt's Palace Cinemas were fully refurbed in 2013 and now have eight auditoria, all licensed, and an impressive foyer with a lounge bar and café on site. Palace Norton Street plays host to some of the best annual film festivals such as the French, Spanish, Greek, German and Italian. It is also in close proximity to the eateries and vibrant culture of Norton Street.

Palace Verona Cinemas
Film

Palace Verona Cinemas

Paddington’s intellectuals, gays and art-house crowds are always seen milling about the Palace Verona with glee. The four screens are on the small side, the seats are snug and the pre-show commercials... well, they tend to go on forever. But we're forgiving film lovers, especially since this oft-buzzing venue screens an expertly curated line-up of arthouse releases from name directors (Woody, the Coens, PT Anderson...), world movies, quirky Australian indies and special one-offs, like screenings of overseas stage productions and concerts. There's a licensed café, wine and espresso bar on the premises – good for a pre-movie drink, a post-movie chat or even just a day date, since you don't have to purchase a ticket to enjoy what they're pouring and brewing. And if you're a frequent moviegoer, you'll want to check out Palace's great-value membership schemes, which are more than worth the investment if you see flicks on the regular.

Chauvel Cinema
Film

Chauvel Cinema

Named after the Australian film pioneer Charles Chauvel - of Jedda fame - this much-loved local cinema is part of the Palace cinema chain. Its proscenium arch brings true grandeur to the art of film and the staff really know their stuff. Screenings tend to be seriously arty and the place also holds Cinemateque screenings. Be sure to seek out the lovely upstairs bar. Bus 333, 352, 378, 380. Screens 2. Tickets $16.50; $9-$12.50 reductions; $8 Tue.

Upcoming film releases in Australia

Their Finest
Film

Their Finest

Gemma Arterton and Bill Nighy shine in a funny feminist WWII romcom by An Education director Lone Scherfig

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Things to Come
Film

Things to Come

This delightful film from French filmmaker Mia Hansen-Løve (Eden, Goodbye First Love) is her first built around a genuine star. Isabelle Huppert gives a typically intelligent and low-key performance as Nathalie, a Parisian philosophy teacher and writer who we meet at a point of personal and intellectual crisis. Her conservative school-teacher husband, Heinz (André Marcon), announces he’s leaving her for his mistress just as their two kids are growing up and fleeing the nest. Meanwhile, her flamboyant elderly mother (Edith Scob) is difficult and unwell. In Nathalie’s profession life, her publishing house has little use for her anymore and her favourite former student, brooding free spirit Fabien (Roman Kolinka), is retreating to an anarchist collective in the mountains. Things to Come could hardly be more French if it declared itself a republic and took up the accordion. It’s steeped in the rhythms and talk of liberal bourgeois metropolitan family life and unfashionably unafraid of ideas – all set to the background of a truly lived-in near-contemporary Paris (Sarkozy is still President) with brief detours to Brittany and the foothills of the Alps. It echoes Hansen-Løve’s previous films in her delicate approach to the passing of time and her sensitivity towards life’s expectations and disappointments. She’s a filmmaker who tends to identify strongly with one lead character, drawing us closely into that person’s life and thoughts, and Huppert is more than up to the job, deliver

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Rules Don't Apply
Film

Rules Don't Apply

Sphinx, playboy and Hollywood legend Warren Beatty, now 79, has used his fame to direct and produce a clutch of daring movies, all of which would have languished without him. Heaven Can Wait (1978) is the kind of impeccable verbal comedy that was going out of style during the dawning era of the blockbuster; Reds (1981) and Bulworth (1998) are examples of the studio machine put to radical political purposes. Even Dick Tracy (1990) is the most unusual thing Madonna ever agreed to be involved with. It may be that Beatty was born to play Howard Hughes, the billionaire mystery man and womaniser who might be described with the same terms above. But the star’s long-gestating passion project, Rules Don’t Apply, has a few unfortunate strikes against it – not least of which is Martin Scorsese’s epic 2004 biopic, The Aviator, which covers similar ground. For his original script, Beatty turns to collaborator Bo Goldman, himself steeped in Hughes lore after penning the off-kilter 1980 comedy Melvin and Howard. In its own impressive way, Rules feels crazier than any previous Hughes film: Beatty leans into the germophobe’s wildness, flinching at the presence of children, refusing to answer questions and – most disturbingly – conducting his affairs from behind a curtain like some ominous figure from a David Lynch nightmare. Distractingly, Beatty foregrounds the romance of two young people: a secretly talented starlet under contract to Hughes (Lily Collins) and a clean-cut limo driver with

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Get Out
Film

Get Out

Get Out has more fun playing with half-buried racial tensions than with scaring us to death

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars

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Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue

Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue

Maybe you saw him on HBO's Treme, or one of his appearances on Conan, Leno, Kimmel or Fallon. Now, hot off the back of touring with the Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Trombone Shorty is coming down under to play Bluesfest and some special sideshows. Joined by his swinging band Orleans Avenue, Trombone Shorty brings brass and big band sounds to life on the stage with serious flair. The jazz and soul maestro isn't a stranger to big stages – he's played at the White House, alongside Madonna and helped out pop producer Mark Ronson on his albums – so you can expect some big vibes from him when he plays the Metro Theatre.

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Barangaroo Ngangamay
Things to do

Barangaroo Ngangamay

Barangaroo Ngangamay is an innovative, interactive artwork that gives you the chance to go on an journey of learning and discovery throughout Barangaroo Reserve. Using an app to place you within the context and history of the site, Barangaroo Ngangamay uses geo-locating to reveal intricate stories, songs and rock engravings scattered throughout the Barangaroo Reserve. The Barangaroo Ngangamay app includes five short films, which are unlocked by visiting sandstone artworks handcarved by Aboriginal elders Vic Simms, Steven Russell and Laurie Bimson. Each film shows the resilience and diversity of Barangaroo and the Aboriginal women who used to call the Reserve home. Created by renowned Indigenous multi-media artists Amanda Jane Reynolds and Genevieve Grieves, the work is the result of a collaboration between the pair and local Aboriginal communities and elders, developed to tell ancient and treasured stories of the world’s oldest living culture. The Barangaroo Ngangamay app is available to download for iOS and Android devices.

Help the homeless by eating kingfish poké
Restaurants

Help the homeless by eating kingfish poké

Hawaiian poké is a dish currently sweeping the world and Salmon & Bear seafood eateries in Zetland and Newtown are among the best places in town to eat it.   Poké – basically a delicious raw fish salad – has been a highlight of Salmon & Bear since they opened, with tuna, salmon and sweet prawn varieties designed by chef Mark Jensen (who taught at the Sydney Seafood School for 15 years). Now Salmon & Bear have created a new kingfish poké: diced Hiramasa kingfish in a miso and sesame dressing served on a salad of kale, quinoa, fennel, tomato, sweet potato, carrot, Spanish onion and pepita seeds. To launch this new dish, Salmon & Bear wanted to support the Newtown Neighbourhood Centre’s First Response Program. The program ensures that anybody who is homeless leaves the centre with a pathway towards getting a roof over their heads. The kingfish poké costs $21, and $2 from every one sold will be donated to the First Response Program, until they’ve raised enough money to get 20 people off the streets. You get a tasty meal, plus the warm feeling of having helped someone in need. Nicely played, Salmon & Bear.  

Sculpture at Scenic World
Kids

Sculpture at Scenic World

When art escapes the galleries and gets out into the landscape, magical things can happen. There’s nothing quite like trekking through a Jurassic-era rainforest, rounding a corner and suddenly spying a cloud of red snowballs, a mosaic of mirrors, a convoy of toy trucks, or a squadron of ninja koalas. That’s the appeal of Sculpture at Scenic World – the element of surprise, delight, to have our senses confounded, our minds provoked – and the reason why the event is enjoying a sixth season in 2017. The exhibition, which kicks off on April 7 and goes for just one month, brings another dimension to Scenic World in Katoomba, and makes a visit especially appealing for parents who want to expose their kids to art as well as the great outdoors.   Take the trip down the steepest railway in the world (the Scenic Railway), then make your way along Australia’s longest elevated boardwalk (the Scenic Walkway) to discover the exhibition. Thirty-five local, interstate and international artists have created works specifically to be installed in the rainforest along the Scenic Walkway. As part of this year’s Sculpture at Scenic World, there is a program of workshops for children called Sculpture for Small People that encourages kids to engage with the artists and their works. These are fun, educational workshops on Saturday and Sunday mornings that cost $15, including all materials, in which children can create their own artworks to take home – from ceramics and Easter Eggs to spider web