Film

Film reviews, festivals, special screenings and more

Ewan McGregor talks Trainspotting and T2: "Renton was the role of a lifetime"
Film

Ewan McGregor talks Trainspotting and T2: "Renton was the role of a lifetime"

"The new one is such a brilliant piece of writing. It does something very special with our nostalgia for these characters"

Mardi Gras Film Festival

Mardi Gras Film Festival

Festival director Paul Struthers notes that this year has seen an increase in the number of lesbian and transgender-themed films programmed – a welcome development

Five five-star films you must see this month
Film

Five five-star films you must see this month

You can tell it's Academy Awards season when the cinemas are crowded with high quality flicks, all hoping to capitalise on the free publicity. These five movies are Oscar hopefuls (with one deliriously weird exception) and all of them rate the maximum five stars from Time Out critics

Horror Movie Campout

Horror Movie Campout

Every good slasher movie gets a sequel, and so it is with the Horror Movie Campout in the eerie parklands of Mount Penang, one hour north of Sydney

Guides for Sydney movie lovers

Read reviews of all the latest films
Film

Read reviews of all the latest films

Get expert opinions on the films currently in Australian cinemas 

Upcoming film festivals in Sydney
Film

Upcoming film festivals in Sydney

Attention movie buffs: add these film festivals to your diary

The best outdoor cinemas in Sydney
Film

The best outdoor cinemas in Sydney

Enjoy a movie alfresco with Time Out's guide to all the outdoor cinema seasons

The top ten Aussie films to scare off tourists
Film

The top ten Aussie films to scare off tourists

A sweaty handful of movies making Tourism Australia's job that little bit harder

More film events in Sydney

Films in cinemas now in Sydney

T2 Trainspotting
Film

T2 Trainspotting

Don't miss the return train to Danny Boyle and Irvine Welsh's Edinburgh

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Hidden Figures
Film

Hidden Figures

This huge-hearted crowd-pleaser has a sophisticated idea running through it: by and large, busy scientists don’t have time for racism or sexism

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Silence
Film

Silence

Martin Scorsese's furiously alive and concentrated parable about faith under fire set in 17th-century Japan ranks among the greatest achievements of spiritually minded cinema

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
The Love Witch
Film

The Love Witch

This vastly entertaining pastiche seems plucked from the same Playboy-era universe of huge hairdos, lurid makeup and voracious female appetites

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Toni Erdmann
Film

Toni Erdmann

Embarrassing dads don't come much more meaningful (or embarrassing) than the one in this German comedy

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
See more films in cinemas now

Movie lists you'll love

The 100 best comedy movies
Film

The 100 best comedy movies

The 50 best family movies
Film

The 50 best family movies

The 50 best romantic comedies
Film

The 50 best romantic comedies

The 100 best horror movies
Film

The 100 best horror movies

The 100 best romantic movies
Film

The 100 best romantic movies

The 100 best animated movies
Film

The 100 best animated movies

The best cinemas in Sydney

Hayden Orpheum Picture Palace
Film

Hayden Orpheum Picture Palace

Without doubt the grandest cinema in Sydney, Cremorne’s Art Deco picture palace is a stunning step back in time. Built in 1935 by George Kenworthy, the top theatrical architect of the period, today’s version is even glitzier than the original thanks to a $2.5-million restoration some years back by owner and local TV celeb Mike Walsh. Each of the six auditoria has its own colour scheme and decor, but the 744-seat Orpheum is the true star of the show. It even has a genuine Wurlitzer cinema organ, which rises out of a stage pit on weekend evenings complete with flashing lights and a grinning organist. Expect a mix of mainstream US, British and Australian fare, with some art-house, special presentations and the occasional cabaret show.

Ritz Cinema Randwick
Film

Ritz Cinema Randwick

With a distinctive Art Deco design restored to its former 1930s glory and an impressive sound system, the six-screen Ritz cinema is both a local landmark and an excellent venue for catching the latest mainstream releases. Signs explain the regulations – no alcohol, bare feet, smoking or skateboards – which make sense if you hit the place in the afternoon after school’s out. In the evening the place attracts a different crowd, including film geeks who seek out the Ritz for its great acoustics and old-fashioned flair. Upstairs the inimitable Bar Ritz boasts a marble bar and balcony – perfect for pre- and post-film drinks. Bus 372, 373, 376, 377.

Palace Norton Street Cinemas
Film

Palace Norton Street Cinemas

Leichhardt's Palace Cinemas were fully refurbed in 2013 and now have eight auditoria, all licensed, and an impressive foyer with a lounge bar and café on site. Palace Norton Street plays host to some of the best annual film festivals such as the French, Spanish, Greek, German and Italian. It is also in close proximity to the eateries and vibrant culture of Norton Street.

Palace Verona Cinemas
Film

Palace Verona Cinemas

Paddington’s intellectuals, gays and art-house crowds are always seen milling about the Palace Verona with glee. The four screens are on the small side, the seats are snug and the pre-show commercials... well, they tend to go on forever. But we're forgiving film lovers, especially since this oft-buzzing venue screens an expertly curated line-up of arthouse releases from name directors (Woody, the Coens, PT Anderson...), world movies, quirky Australian indies and special one-offs, like screenings of overseas stage productions and concerts. There's a licensed café, wine and espresso bar on the premises – good for a pre-movie drink, a post-movie chat or even just a day date, since you don't have to purchase a ticket to enjoy what they're pouring and brewing. And if you're a frequent moviegoer, you'll want to check out Palace's great-value membership schemes, which are more than worth the investment if you see flicks on the regular.

Chauvel Cinema
Film

Chauvel Cinema

Named after the Australian film pioneer Charles Chauvel - of Jedda fame - this much-loved local cinema is part of the Palace cinema chain. Its proscenium arch brings true grandeur to the art of film and the staff really know their stuff. Screenings tend to be seriously arty and the place also holds Cinemateque screenings. Be sure to seek out the lovely upstairs bar. Bus 333, 352, 378, 380. Screens 2. Tickets $16.50; $9-$12.50 reductions; $8 Tue.

Upcoming film releases in Australia

Jasper Jones
Film

Jasper Jones

A beloved Australian novel gets a film adaptation, with mixed results

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Miss Sloane
Film

Miss Sloane

Jessica Chastain flexes her extraordinary Meryl Streep-like range and just about keeps this convoluted political thriller in the realm of enjoyably watchable

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
David Stratton: A Cinematic Life
Film

David Stratton: A Cinematic Life

Care to hazard a guess as to how many movies Strats has seen?

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Loving
Film

Loving

Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga play an interracial couple and unwitting heroes of the 1960s civil rights movement in this sensible, compassionate drama 

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
The Space Between Us
Film

The Space Between Us

This interplanetary romance about a Martian boy and an Earth girl is pure sentimental schlock

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars

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Here's what it's like to try opera for the first time
Theatre

Here's what it's like to try opera for the first time

Opera is one of our most revered forms of culture. But with great reputation comes a high intimidation-factor. At Time Out, we’re lucky enough to have seen plenty of operas, so we know it’s not all valkyries in horned helmets and heavy breast armour. But we also know not everyone has been so lucky. Like Shakespeare, The Iliad and The Odyssey or Jane Austen, opera has worked itself so deeply into our pop-cultural imaginations that most of us can probably recognise Bizet’s ‘Habanera’ aria, or the twisty plotting of Cosi Fan Tutte without necessarily knowing where it came from. Given this sense of familiarity, we figured that for most people, seeing a famous opera for the first time will feel more like reconnecting with an old friend than meeting someone new. To test the theory, we gathered together four young creative types, with very different backgrounds, from three different cities, with one thing in common: they’d never been to the opera as an adult. We brought them all to Sydney for Opera Australia’s production of Puccini’s La Boheme and filmed the results.   Melburnian Ali Barter may make grungy guitar pop now, but the Girlie Bits singer is also a classically trained soprano. As a kid, she’d actually appeared on stage in an opera, but she’d never seen one performed before. “I imagine I’m going to be blown away by their technical ability,” she told us before the show. True to her word, she came out impressed. “Just their breathing ability… it was incredible. Now I kn

Sky Terrace
Bars

Sky Terrace

At the first sign of summer in Sydney we’re on the look out for a place to kick back with a couple of friends, cocktail in hand, and views of our beautiful harbour. The Star's Sky Terrace has one of the most impressive views in the city, from the Harbour Bridge to the skyscrapers, and it’s open every weekend until March.  From Friday nights to Sunday sessions, you’ll find DJs playing a soundtrack to your summer. This year, they have pop-up bars from Heineken, Grey Goose, Country Club Tequila and Tanquery Gin, so no matter what your tipple there’ll be a cocktail list to match your mood. There’s also giant jenga and foosball – perfect for a Sunday arvo catch-up.  Peckish? You can choose from a range of casual dining fare including: lobster rolls with crisps, philly cheese steak, brie and jalapeno quesadillas and more.

Ten dishes you have to eat on The Streets of Barangaroo
Restaurants

Ten dishes you have to eat on The Streets of Barangaroo

For years the waterfront north of Darling Harbour was home to, well, not much. You might exit right at the King Street ferry and plunge into the tourist morass therein. Exit left nowadays and you’ll find yourself in, arguably, Sydney’s best dining district. Midweek, The Streets of Barangaroo hum with the CBD’s lunching masses. At the weekend, Wynyard Station deposits foodies at the doorstep of this hub of outposts from Sydney’s top restaurants. Today, cult eats right on the water’s edge – from Spanish to Vietnamese cuisine, Louisiana-style barbecue to sushi, bakeries, gelaterias, cocktail bars and coffee shops – woo you in. The precinct’s plan to create a place where you can work, eat, shop, live and play all within a few hundred metres along Sydney’s glittering harbour edge has coalesced into buzzing reality. And you have to taste it.

Landmarks
Art

Landmarks

Blue Mountains City Art Gallery presents Landmarks, a major contemporary exhibition featuring works by some of the world's most prominent land and environmental artists. Landmarks features work by some of the most significant artists of the late 20th and early 21st century, including Christo & Jeanne-Claude, Simryn Gill, Andy Goldsworthy, Andreas Gursky, Richard Long, Perejaume, Imants Tillers, and internationally renowned Blue Mountains artists Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro, who contributed a brand new commission titled 'The Ugly Stick Orchestra'. Drawing upon the John Kaldor Family Collection at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Landmarks is an important exhibition developed in partnership with the Art Gallery of New South Wales for the fifth anniversary of the Blue Mountains Cultural Centre, an outstanding regional gallery and a visitor drawcard of increasing importance.