Art

Art in Sydney on now

Must-see art in July
Art

Must-see art in July

July is Archibald season – but there's more to this month than famous faces.

Where to see art at night
Art

Where to see art at night

Everyone knows that it’s after hours that Sydney’s art galleries really get down to business.

The best public art in Sydney
Art

The best public art in Sydney

Public art – in any city – is a notoriously fraught business. No matter how hard you try to make everyone happy, every work will have its detractors. Some more than others, of course. Notable spats in Sydney’s public art history include the time residents threatened to dismantle Ken Unsworth’s ‘poo on sticks’ sculpture in Darlinghurst (it still stands); the time NSW Parliamentarian Helen Sham-Ho said Lin Li’s ‘Golden Water Mouth’ sculpture in Chinatown “looks like a penis”; and the time Oz editor Richard Neville ran a cover photo of himself and two others peeing into Tom Bass’s P&O Wall Fountain. That said, who could possibly argue for a city without public art? It’s (mostly) good for the eyes, good for the soul, and improves even the most uninviting locations. It’s also good for business, which has been part of the drive in Sydney over the last decade to revitalise laneways and commercial precincts with commissions from contemporary artists, architects and designers. In 2007, the City of Sydney appointed their first Public Art Advisory Panel – a mix of artists, curators and architects that currently includes Carriageworks director Lisa Havilah and installation artist Janet Laurence. Now you know who to thank/complain to.  Since it’s Art Month in Sydney, we thought we’d share some of our favourite public art works in Sydney.

The best art galleries in Sydney
Art

The best art galleries in Sydney

Sydney is busting at the seams with great art – from major institutions to incredible privately-owned galleries.

Art exhibitions to see in Sydney

Your guide to contemporary, fine and Indigenous art in Sydney

The best places to see art in Sydney
Art

The best places to see art in Sydney

Sydney is busting at the seams with great art – from major institutions like the Art Gallery of NSW and the Museum of Contemporary Art, to incredible privately-owned but publically accessible (and free!) galleries like White Rabbit and Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, and right down to a thriving scene of independent and artist-run initiatives. Below are some of our favourites.

The best ARIs in Sydney
Art

The best ARIs in Sydney

If you're after emerging and experimental art, here are ten key artist-run initiatives (ARIs) to get you started.

Cutting edge commercial galleries
Art

Cutting edge commercial galleries

You don't have to be a buyer to browse these top commercial art galleries in Sydney.

Where to see Aboriginal art
Art

Where to see Aboriginal art

Whether you're visiting from overseas or a curious local looking to get beyond the basics, here's where to start.

Upcoming events and exhibitions

MCA Artbar

MCA Artbar

The Museum of Contemporary Art's monthly party series is curated by a different artist or collective each edition, and features art, performance and design – with killer views, party tunes and hands-on activities with artists. Since Artbar kicked off in May 2012, we’ve seen the MCA's galleries graced with nude performance art, endurance table tennis, house party-style karaoke, vomit montages, huge inflatables and a live goat. Ah, artists. Never change. The parties tend to sell out in advance, so consider pre-purchasing those tickets. Click through the Dates & Times tab for the line-up for each edition of Artbar.

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Kaldor Public Art Project 33
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Kaldor Public Art Project 33

John Kaldor has been helping international artists transform Sydney since Christo and Jeanne-Claude wrapped the coast of Little Bay in 1969. In 2016, he and his team made it possible for Sydney artist Jonathan Jones to take-over part of the Royal Botanic Gardens with his ambitious public art project barrangal dyara. Next up, Kaldor Public Art Projects has set it sights on Sydney’s Observatory Hill, where Berlin based Albanian artist Anri Sala will be taking over the 105-year-old Rotunda with the world premiere of a new public art project inspired by the site and by Sydney’s colonial history. The subject of a major career survey at New York’s New Museum in 2016, Sala is best known for works that engage with social and political histories. For the last 15-or-so years, he’s been increasingly interested in music and sound as psychologically-charged mediums for evoking and reinterpreting the past.   Anri Sala, 2013 Photograph: Marc Domage     From a distance, Kaldor Public Art Project 33 will look like business as usual; as you approach the Rotunda on Observatory Hill, however, you’ll hear the difference: orchestral music, and the sound of 38 snare drums. Suspended from the ceiling of the pavilion, with reflective mirror skins facing down, the snares will tap out an altered version of Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto in A Major, in sync with a recorded track. A site visit in 2012 inspired Sala’s project, titled The Last Resort. The artist became fascinated with the history

Pipilotti Rist
Art

Pipilotti Rist

Pipilotti Rist's four-wall video aquarium 'Mercy Garden Retour Skin' at the MCA was one of our favourite works in the 2014 Biennale of Sydney. The artist will be back in the building come October 2017, for a major survey of her work spanning from the late 1980s to now, curated by the MCA's Natasha Bullock. Among the works show, we're hoping that her 1997 work 'Ever Is Over All' – reportedly an inspiration for Beyoncé's 'Hold Up' clip from Lemonade – makes an appearance. This exhibition is part of the Sydney International Art Series, which within the last two years has brought Yoko Ono and Grayson Perry to the MCA, and the forthcoming Tatsuo Miyajima exhibition. See who's at the AGNSW in summer 2017.

Rembrandt at AGNSW
Art

Rembrandt at AGNSW

This survey of 17th century Dutch masters will feature the work of Rembrandt, Vermeer, Ruisdael, Hals, Steen, Dou, Lievens and Leyster.

News and interviews

The 2017 Archibald Prize says goodbye to gender parity, hello to 'old white men in chairs'
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The 2017 Archibald Prize says goodbye to gender parity, hello to 'old white men in chairs'

The finalists for the Archibald Prize – Australia’s longest-running art prize, and one of Sydney’s best-attended annual exhibitions – have been announced. And there’s good news and bad news. Let’s do the bad news first: unfortunately, having said hello to gender parity in 2016, for the first time in its history, the Archibald has said goodbye to it in 2017. Just 14 of the 43 finalists for this year’s Prize are women – a third. (It’s slightly better when it comes to sitters: of the 43 finalists, 20 feature female sitters – including two paintings featuring both a man and a woman.) The good news? If you are partial to portraits of old white men sitting in chairs, then boy howdy is this the exhibition for you. There are eight such paintings in the finalist line-up, a true boon.   Fewer women appear sitting on chairs (just three) – although we’ll never know how many of the 822 entries for the 2017 Archibald Prize fell into this sub-genre. The fact that this year’s Packing Room Prize winner features Lisa Wilkinson reclining on a couch feels like some kind of clue...   Packing Room Prize winner 'Lisa Wilkinson AM' by Peter Smeeth     But are the paintings any good? As always, the people of Australia (read: Sydney) must decide. You can make up your mind via the online gallery of finalist portraits, and/or when the Archibald Prize exhibition opens. You can check out the Archibald Prize exhibition from July 29 at the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Here’s what else is

These two transportive exhibitions examine nature and the sublime
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These two transportive exhibitions examine nature and the sublime

Welcome to the 25th guest blog post of Time Out Sydney's 52 Weeks of #SydCulture 2017 challenge! June's culture selector is Emily Nicol, a journalist and producer for Koori Radio and NITV, and the guest editor for Time Out Sydney's May 2017 Deadly Sydney issue. Every Wednesday of May, Emily will be telling us what she loved the week before. Think of it as your recommendations for this week, from someone who sees a helluva lot of arts and culture. Over to her. Every time I walk into the Art Gallery of New South Wales I immediately think: I need to come here more often! The green and lush grounds and the building itself are always beautiful to see, but inside you’re guaranteed to be transported somewhere else – within your own psyche, or to another time and place. This week I decided to check out two of the current exhibitions, and experienced a nice respite from a very busy week. In the 20th and 21st century Australian art section, AGNSW have curated a one-room exhibition of works by American-born Tasmania-based photographer David Stephenson, titled Human Landscapes and mostly featuring works from the early ’80s.   David Stephenson ‘Alaska pipeline, Brooks Range, Alaska’ (1981) Photograph: Felicity Jenkins, AGNSW     Stephenson’s approach to landscape photography draws the viewer in, piquing curiosity about the subject and its environment, however stark. It takes a clever hand to unveil the layers and cinematic life that live beneath an otherwise ordinary everyday

Acclaimed international artist Anri Sala is taking over Sydney's Observatory Hill
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Acclaimed international artist Anri Sala is taking over Sydney's Observatory Hill

John Kaldor has been helping international artists transform Sydney since Christo and Jeanne-Claude wrapped the coast of Little Bay in 1969. In 2016, he and his team made it possible for Sydney artist Jonathan Jones to take-over part of the Royal Botanic Gardens with his ambitious public art project barrangal dyara. Next up, Kaldor Public Art Projects has set it sights on Sydney’s Observatory Hill, where Berlin based Albanian artist Anri Sala will be taking over the 105-year-old Rotunda with the world premiere of a new public art project inspired by the site and by Sydney’s colonial history. The subject of a major career survey at New York’s New Museum in 2016, Sala is best known for works that engage with social and political histories. For the last 15-or-so years, he’s been increasingly interested in music and sound as psychologically-charged mediums for evoking and reinterpreting the past.   Anri Sala, 2013 Photograph: Marc Domage     From a distance, Kaldor Public Art Project 33 will look like business as usual; as you approach the Rotunda on Observatory Hill, however, you’ll hear the difference: orchestral music, and the sound of 38 snare drums. Suspended from the ceiling of the pavilion, with reflective mirror skins facing down, the snares will tap out an altered version of Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto in A Major, in sync with a recorded track. A site visit in 2012 inspired Sala’s project, titled The Last Resort. The artist became fascinated with the history

There’s an alternative Biennale festival coming to Sydney
Blog

There’s an alternative Biennale festival coming to Sydney

Imagine if the Biennale of Sydney was in one venue, and you got to meet and hang out with the artists as they were making their artworks? Imagine if it was also a two-day festival in which you got to be part of interactive artworks, immerse yourself in installations and performances, and party with some of your favourite local musicians and performers? Enter Underbelly Arts 2017 Lab & Festival: a weekend featuring 21 art installations, performance and interactive works – Underbelly Arts Festival – preceded by a two-week Underbelly Arts Lab in which the artists create their work – and you get to watch them doing it. The sixth edition of Underbelly Arts, curated by incoming festival director (and Underbelly alumnus) Roslyn Helper, features 21 brand-new works that have been commissioned and funded, and will be site-specific. There will be a new performance by musician Marcus Whale (Collarbones) and artist Eugene Choi, featuring a 30-piece choir; there will be an interactive inflatable work created by Amrita Hepi, Honey Long and Prue Stent; there will be a six-hour queer, contemporary remix of traditional Peking Opera, by dancer/choreographer Shian Law; and there will be an interactive ‘Netflix-style’ show, by theatre-maker and filmmaker Laurence Rosier-Staines.   Roslyn Helper performing 'The Human Google Project' at Underbelly Arts Festival 2015 Photograph: Ash Berdebes           It’s this kind of ambitious programming that has established Underbelly – over ten y

Street artist Shepard Fairey unveils his gigantic new mural in Sydney’s CBD
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Street artist Shepard Fairey unveils his gigantic new mural in Sydney’s CBD

The US street artist best known for his OBEY GIANT brand and the Barack Obama HOPE campaign has unveiled his first permanent mural in Australia. It’s the artist’s largest wall piece to date, 44 metres high and 28 metres wide, and it features a green-blue painted woman with flowers in her hair, a waratah and the word ‘obey’. “The idea of consciously obeying versus subconsciously conforming has been something that’s important to me,” says the 47 year old, who brought with him a team of artists from LA to help complete the project. “It’s designed to encourage people to question whether they agree with what they’re confronted with.” Sandra Chipchase, CEO of Destination NSW, commissioned the artwork as part of Vivid Sydney, which she says is the “largest art mural in Sydney’s history”. It’s more subtle than the artist’s political work, and Fairey says his brief was to stay apolitical and positive, though he didn’t “feel like this [was] a compromise... “I’m now addressing what I think is a full spectrum, from angry and provocative to gentle and more diplomatic. It’s much easier to get approval for public works that are not controversial. Photograph: Destination NSW   “To me, the real crux is democratising my art. Public art is a way for me to reach a lot of people… I always try to find an opportunity to do a larger scale work that maintains that aspect of my philosophy, though I’m now sometimes welcome in more elite circles.” Fairey says he hopes ‘The Peace Waratah’ s

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Vote for the bar making your favourite Patrón XO Café Espresso Martini and win a $200 bar tab
Bars

Vote for the bar making your favourite Patrón XO Café Espresso Martini and win a $200 bar tab

If the mere thought of an Espresso Martini makes your heart beat a little faster, then it’s a great time to live in Sydney right now. For a limited time, a selection of top Sydney bars curated by Patrón are creating special twists on the classic Espresso Martini, using Patrón XO Café. Each of these bars is putting their own expression on the cocktail, and together, they make up the Expresso Society (get it?). They’re shaking up the classic cocktail in all sorts of delicious ways – Rosie Campbell’s ‘Patroco’ blends Patrón XO Café, chocolate liqueur and homemade toasted coconut syrup and coconut cream to create a tropical holiday in a glass. For a nutty kick, try Café del Mar’s ‘Espresso del Mar’, which adds Frangelico, hazelnut syrup and butterscotch to Patrón XO Café and espresso. The creativity doesn’t stop there. Bars like Paddington Inn are adding sweetness by throwing burnt marshmallows into the mix, while the clever bartenders at Pitt Street’s Mexican diner Mejico are staying true to their roots by using Peloton Mezcal and agave in their ‘MeXo Espresso’. The question is: which of these Espresso Martinis do you most want to drink? To win a $200 tab at one of these Sydney bars, tell us which cocktail recipe takes your fancy (the full list is here). Enter by telling us which of these Patrón XO Café Espresso Martinis you'd most like to drink, and why by Monday July 31. Name: Email: I'd like to drink: (25 words or less)  Tick this box to hear more from Patrón XO

Just for Laughs

Just for Laughs

Now in its 7th year, Just For Laughs has become a comedy fixture for Sydney, presenting a largely Antipodean, UK and American line-up across Sydney Opera House, Enmore Theatre – and this year, City Recital Hall. This year's line-up includes Kevin Bridges, Rhys Darby, Gad Elmaleh, Bert Kreischer, Claire Hooper and Mel Buttle. Popular podcasts will be coming to life with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark of My Favorite Murder hitting the Enmore, while the Little Dum Dum Club, and Wil Anderson and Charlie Clausen of TOFOP will take to the Opera House's stages.  The Opera House's Northern Foyer will also be home to the Just For Laughs Bar, where ticket holders can sink some craft beers and relax pre or post-show. Returning this year is the popular All-Star Gala (which tends to sell out), which will be hosted by Dave Hughes. You'll also get some LOL-time in with Community star and The Soup host Joel McHale, while Tommy Little will host the Stand Up Series (rebranded in 2017 as Just For Laughs Australia: Live) in the Studio: six shows of local and international comedians doing short sets back to back, filmed for The Comedy Channel. Click through the Dates & Times tab to see who's on where, when. 

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Little Creatures Live
Things to do

Little Creatures Live

You might already enjoy their beer – including Pale Ale, Rogers' and Dog Days – but did you know there's a way to take your Little Creatures love a little deeper? This year the brewery is taking their show on the road with a series of parties that feature live performance art, food and beer at various on-premise locations and festivals across Australia. They're calling it Little Creatures Live – inspired by the original moniker of their very first Pale Ale, brewed their own way with fresh hops flowers and live yeast.  Little Creatures Live will be back in Sydney very soon. Curious as to what to expect? Check out our recaps below. Or if you can't wait, why not pay a visit to Little Creatures' Fremantle or Geelong breweries? 

Time Out Food Awards
Restaurants Buy tickets

Time Out Food Awards

Forks at the ready, Sydney: the Time Out Food Awards are back and bigger than ever. Join us on Monday September 25 as we toast the city’s best fine dining restaurants and casual diners; degustations and sensational takeaways; top chefs and rising stars. Expect delicious drinks, sweet tunes brought to you by Flex Mami, and great food by Porteño – not to mention all the suspense of the awards as we give back to those venues and talent that make feasting in Sydney superb. Tickets are $70 + BF and include food, drink, fun and a copy of the annual Time Out Food Awards issue ($4.95 value), hot off the presses before it hits newsstands. Keen? Limited first release tickets go on sale Thursday July 20. For a taste of last year's action, check out our 2016 winners.  You can also have your say by voting in the People's Choice awards. Powered by Eventbrite in association with

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