Art

Art in Sydney on now

Must-see art in February
Art

Must-see art in February

Catch the summer blockbusters before they go – and plan ahead for the month's biggest openings.

Where to see art at night
Art

Where to see art at night

Everyone knows that it’s after hours that Sydney’s art galleries really get down to business.

The best art galleries in Sydney
Art

The best art galleries in Sydney

Sydney is busting at the seams with great art – from major institutions to incredible privately-owned galleries.

The best ARIs in Sydney
Art

The best ARIs in Sydney

If you're after emerging and experimental art, the best place to look is the independent spaces run by artists themselves.

Art exhibitions to see in Sydney

Your guide to contemporary, fine and Indigenous art in Sydney

The best places to see art in Sydney
Art

The best places to see art in Sydney

Sydney is busting at the seams with great art – from major institutions like the Art Gallery of NSW and the Museum of Contemporary Art, to incredible privately-owned but publically accessible (and free!) galleries like White Rabbit and Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, and right down to a thriving scene of independent and artist-run initiatives. Below are some of our favourites.

The best ARIs in Sydney
Art

The best ARIs in Sydney

If you're after emerging and experimental art, here are ten key artist-run initiatives (ARIs) to get you started.

Cutting edge commercial galleries
Art

Cutting edge commercial galleries

You don't have to be a buyer to browse these top commercial art galleries in Sydney.

Where to see Aboriginal art
Art

Where to see Aboriginal art

Whether you're visiting from overseas or a curious local looking to get beyond the basics, here's where to start.

Upcoming events and exhibitions

The Dark Matters
Art

The Dark Matters

After two blistering, provocative shows in 2016 (Heavy Artillery and Vile Bodies) White Rabbit Gallery are going zen for their next show: The Dark Matters explores how contemporary Chinese artists are working with (and in some cases against) tradition. At the same time, the exhibition will embrace certain aspects of the past, including the black-and-white colour code of traditional ink paintings. The Dark Matters will present work by 34 artists, including Lin Yan, Feng Mengbo, Jiang Pengyi, Lin Tianmiao, Tang Nannan, Li Xiaofei and Yang Mushi.  A centrepiece of the exhibition will be a large paper installation by New York-based artist Lin Yan, who will visit Sydney to install the work.

The National
Art

The National

Sydney gets a new biennale in 2017 – or rather a new biennial – focusing on new Australian art.

John Olsen

John Olsen

A vital chapter of Australia's artistic history comes to life in this seven-decade survey of Olsen's career.

Rembrandt and the Golden Age of Dutch Art
Art

Rembrandt and the Golden Age of Dutch Art

This survey of 17th century Dutch masters will feature the work of Rembrandt, Vermeer, Ruisdael, Hals, Steen, Dou, Lievens and Leyster.

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News and interviews

A giant sparkling clitoris is making a splash in Sydney this summer
Blog

A giant sparkling clitoris is making a splash in Sydney this summer

Did you know that clitorises range from 7-12 cm in length and swell by 50 to 300 per cent when engorged? Yup: that little bauble you've been told about is actually just the tip of the clit-berg; most of the clitoris is below the surface and invisible, wrapping around the vaginal tunnel and extending out towards the thighs. (Which makes stand-up bits about 'finding the clitoris' embarrassing in a whole new way). Don't believe us? Check out the giant bedazzled clitoris ensconced in Redfern's Bearded Tit bar. Created by artist Alli Sebastian Wolf, the 'Glitoris' is a 100:1 scale model of the female sex organ, covered in sequins. AKA: the most fabulous anatomy lesson you can have. Wolf, who describes the clitoris (the actual one) as "a glorious spaceship-looking creature with 8000 nerves that can swell to three times its size in moments", created the 'Glitoris' partly as a feminist performance piece. The Glit will be at the Bearded Tit until February 25 as part of their exhibition Bush Magic, and will also be shimmying its way onto the d-floor at the following parties, with three human pals (the 'Cliterati') in attendance: • Heaps Gay Street Party on Sat Feb 11 in Marrickville • Mardi Gras Heaps Gay on Sat Mar 4 at The Factory Theatre • The Oyster Club Glamdrogynous Freakshow on Thu Mar 9 at Knox St Bar.   In all its glory: the 'Glitoris'Photograph: Alli Sebastian Wolf     Here are four more facts about the clit, courtesy of Alli, that'll make your day: 1. It is th

52 Weeks of #SydCulture: Week 4
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52 Weeks of #SydCulture: Week 4

Welcome to the third guest blog post of Time Out Sydney's 52 Weeks of #SydCulture 2017 challenge! Every Tuesday of January, curator and City of Sydney councillor Jess Scully is telling us what she loved the week before. Think of it as your recommendations for this week, from someone who sees a helluva lot of arts and culture. Over to Jess. Did you march on Saturday? Don't feel too bad if you didn't. Certified feminist friends were absent and asked, what exactly were you marching for? Reminding the world that women exist? “We’re here, we’re…50 per cent of the population?” It's a statement of the bleeding obvious, but unfortunately, one that still needs to be made. The Women's March started a day in which I contemplated the absurdity of oppression (and I wonder why I'm single); or rather, a day of experiencing some of the humour, sensitivity and skill that artists use to break oppression apart. After marching with thousands of strong women, I rode down to Firstdraft to see Walan Yinaagirbang (‘Strong Women’ in Wiradjuri) an exhibition of work by eight female Indigenous artists brought together by curator Emily McDaniel.   Amy Tracey 'Girra-maa' at FirstdraftPhotograph: Daniel Boud     Amy Tracey’s bouquets of native flowers adorn the brick of the stairs, sanctifying the space. Everywhere, women's knowledge is honoured. Lucy Simpson’s weaving spans across one room, caked in ochre, facing Tamara Baillie’s Awash. Cast in cotton stiffened by sugar, river networks and wat

Wednesday nights = Culture Up Late
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Wednesday nights = Culture Up Late

Arts Minister Troy Grant's previously-announced Wednesday-night program Culture Up Late launches tonight – Wednesday January 11 – with a program of events taking place at the Art Gallery of NSW, the Australian Museum, Carriageworks, the Powerhouse Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the State Library of NSW, and Sydney Opera House. Every Wednesday through January and February you'll be able to head to these venues after work for access to exhibitions and a range of special programs and offers. Art Gallery of NSW will continue its existing Wednesday-night late-night program, Art After Hours (they're also running the Nude at Night program on Thursday and Friday nights in January). The MCA, meanwhile, have moved their weekly Lights on Later series from Thursdays to Wednesdays. The Australian Museum will offer 2-for-1 entry on Wednesday nights, giving you access to their regular exhibits and current exhibitions (including Spiders: Alive and Deadly) as well as the chance to experience Lynette Wallworth’s immersive virtual reality work Collisions, which takes you to remote central Australia and invites you into the landscape and memories of Martu elder Nyarri Nyarri Morgan. Collisions is only viewable to the public on Wednesday nights, as part of the Culture Up Late program. Head to the Powerhouse Museum in Ultimo for after-hours access to their current exhibition Egyptian Mummies; and to its sister venue Sydney Observatory for twilight tours and night-time star gazing. C

Carriageworks reveal their 2017 program
Blog

Carriageworks reveal their 2017 program

Carriageworks has revealed its 2017 program of art, performance and music – including hyped shows from interstate and overseas, world premieres, and the return of favourite events including the queer performance/dance party Day For Night, Indigenous musical festival Klub Koori, and a new series of Night Markets. Perhaps the most exciting component – announced earlier this year – is the inaugural edition of The National, a new biennial of contemporary Australian art focusing on site-specific commissions, and running across Carriageworks, the MCA and Art Gallery of New South Wales. The Carriageworks edition, curated by director Lisa Havilah and visual arts head Nina Miall, will run March 30-June 18, and include work by Archie Moore, Justene Williams and Richard Lewer, among others.   Justene Williams ‘Two Fold’ performance still at Heide Museum of Modern Art, 2016Photograph: Andy Nowell   In terms of international treats, Italian theatre renegades Motus are bringing their hybrid show MDLSX to Carriageworks in mid-March after a short run at Adelaide Festival. Starring androgynous DJ Silvia Calderoni, the show blends her home videos and autobiography with Jeffrey Eugenides’ novel Middlesex and a DJ set to explore queer identity. It looks heady. MDLSX by MOTUS from ALBAMADA on Vimeo. In terms of anticipated inter-state works, Melbourne Festival hit Lady Eats Apple, by Geelong-based theatre ensemble Back to Back Theatre (behind internationally acclaimed shows Ganesh Ve

Tatsuo Miyajima: the guide
Blog

Tatsuo Miyajima: the guide

We've got the who, what and why-to-get-excited about MCA's summer blockbuster.

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Here's what it's like to try opera for the first time
Theatre

Here's what it's like to try opera for the first time

Opera is one of our most revered forms of culture. But with great reputation comes a high intimidation-factor. At Time Out, we’re lucky enough to have seen plenty of operas, so we know it’s not all valkyries in horned helmets and heavy breast armour. But we also know not everyone has been so lucky. Like Shakespeare, The Iliad and The Odyssey or Jane Austen, opera has worked itself so deeply into our pop-cultural imaginations that most of us can probably recognise Bizet’s ‘Habanera’ aria, or the twisty plotting of Cosi Fan Tutte without necessarily knowing where it came from. Given this sense of familiarity, we figured that for most people, seeing a famous opera for the first time will feel more like reconnecting with an old friend than meeting someone new. To test the theory, we gathered together four young creative types, with very different backgrounds, from three different cities, with one thing in common: they’d never been to the opera as an adult. We brought them all to Sydney for Opera Australia’s production of Puccini’s La Boheme and filmed the results.   Melburnian Ali Barter may make grungy guitar pop now, but the Girlie Bits singer is also a classically trained soprano. As a kid, she’d actually appeared on stage in an opera, but she’d never seen one performed before. “I imagine I’m going to be blown away by their technical ability,” she told us before the show. True to her word, she came out impressed. “Just their breathing ability… it was incredible. Now I kn

Sky Terrace
Bars

Sky Terrace

At the first sign of summer in Sydney we’re on the look out for a place to kick back with a couple of friends, cocktail in hand, and views of our beautiful harbour. The Star's Sky Terrace has one of the most impressive views in the city, from the Harbour Bridge to the skyscrapers, and it’s open every weekend until March.  From Friday nights to Sunday sessions, you’ll find DJs playing a soundtrack to your summer. This year, they have pop-up bars from Heineken, Grey Goose, Country Club Tequila and Tanquery Gin, so no matter what your tipple there’ll be a cocktail list to match your mood. There’s also giant jenga and foosball – perfect for a Sunday arvo catch-up.  Peckish? You can choose from a range of casual dining fare including: lobster rolls with crisps, philly cheese steak, brie and jalapeno quesadillas and more.

Ten dishes you have to eat on The Streets of Barangaroo
Restaurants

Ten dishes you have to eat on The Streets of Barangaroo

For years the waterfront north of Darling Harbour was home to, well, not much. You might exit right at the King Street ferry and plunge into the tourist morass therein. Exit left nowadays and you’ll find yourself in, arguably, Sydney’s best dining district. Midweek, The Streets of Barangaroo hum with the CBD’s lunching masses. At the weekend, Wynyard Station deposits foodies at the doorstep of this hub of outposts from Sydney’s top restaurants. Today, cult eats right on the water’s edge – from Spanish to Vietnamese cuisine, Louisiana-style barbecue to sushi, bakeries, gelaterias, cocktail bars and coffee shops – woo you in. The precinct’s plan to create a place where you can work, eat, shop, live and play all within a few hundred metres along Sydney’s glittering harbour edge has coalesced into buzzing reality. And you have to taste it.

Landmarks
Art

Landmarks

Blue Mountains City Art Gallery presents Landmarks, a major contemporary exhibition featuring works by some of the world's most prominent land and environmental artists. Landmarks features work by some of the most significant artists of the late 20th and early 21st century, including Christo & Jeanne-Claude, Simryn Gill, Andy Goldsworthy, Andreas Gursky, Richard Long, Perejaume, Imants Tillers, and internationally renowned Blue Mountains artists Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro, who contributed a brand new commission titled 'The Ugly Stick Orchestra'. Drawing upon the John Kaldor Family Collection at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Landmarks is an important exhibition developed in partnership with the Art Gallery of New South Wales for the fifth anniversary of the Blue Mountains Cultural Centre, an outstanding regional gallery and a visitor drawcard of increasing importance.