Art & Culture

The best art exhibitions in Tokyo, plus features and interviews – it's your ultimate guide to the city's art scene

teamLab Borderless digital art museum is turning pink for the cherry blossom season
News

teamLab Borderless digital art museum is turning pink for the cherry blossom season

The museum has some special themed lights planned in celebration of the upcoming sakura season...

Best art exhibitions in Tokyo this winter
Art

Best art exhibitions in Tokyo this winter

Enjoy conceptual and surrealist art, mythical scroll paintings, Chinese calligraphy and much, much more

Floor-by-floor guide to the Yayoi Kusama Museum
Art

Floor-by-floor guide to the Yayoi Kusama Museum

What to expect when visiting this highly anticipated museum full of pumpkins and polka dots

Best art museums in Tokyo
Art

Best art museums in Tokyo

Our picks for the best art museums in Tokyo, from traditional Japanese paintings to Renaissance classics and contemporary works

Guide to Japanese calligraphy art
Art

Guide to Japanese calligraphy art

More than just black ink on white paper, calligraphy art is the aesthetic embodiment of Zen in Japanese culture

The best ongoing exhibitions in Tokyo

Kawanabe Kyosai: Nothing Escaped His Brush
Art

Kawanabe Kyosai: Nothing Escaped His Brush

Known as the ‘demon of painting’, Kawanabe Kyosai (1831-1889) playfully depicted spirits, animals and otherworldly creatures in his works...

Toshiko Okanoue, Photo Collage: The Miracle of Silence
Art

Toshiko Okanoue, Photo Collage: The Miracle of Silence

Japanese artist Toshiko Okanoue was exposed to the western surrealist tradition when she met Shuzo Takiguchi, the leader of the surrealist movement in Japan, in 1951. Influenced by the Collage Novel of Max Ernst, Okanoue developed her artistic skills through the use of photo collage...

Lineage of Eccentrics: The Miraculous World of Edo Painting
Art

Lineage of Eccentrics: The Miraculous World of Edo Painting

Based on art historian Nobuo Tsuji’s 1970 book ‘Lineage of Eccentrics’, this exhibition explores the powerfully imaginative world of Edo paintings...

Jesús Rafael Soto: Pénétrable BBL Bleu
Art

Jesús Rafael Soto: Pénétrable BBL Bleu

This installation encourages you to interact with it by walking through the space and immersing yourself in both kinetic and optical ways

Le Corbusier and the Age of Purism
Art

Le Corbusier and the Age of Purism

The National Museum of Western Art is hosting an exhibition dedicated to Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, better known by his pseudonym Le Corbusier (1887-1965), the architect who designed this very building. Jeanneret is widely regarded as one of the three greatest masters of modern architecture...

Roppongi Crossing 2019: Connexions
Art

Roppongi Crossing 2019: Connexions

Held every three years, Mori Art Museum’s ‘Roppongi Crossing’ series provides an close-up look at Japan’s changing art scene...

See more art exhibitions in Tokyo

Upcoming exhibitions

The Lighting Art of Kabuki
Art

The Lighting Art of Kabuki

he performance is created not with actors but with a mixture of holograms and music for a wholly immersive experience...

Moomin Exhibition
Art

Moomin Exhibition

The history of this iconic Finnish character will be explored through 500-plus pieces of Moomin-related artworks...

Syd Mead Progressions TYO 2019
Museums

Syd Mead Progressions TYO 2019

The ‘visual futurist’ Syd Mead is a world-renowned industrial designer, responsible for product designs for companies like Ford as well as concept art for famous movies like ‘Star Trek’, ‘Mission Impossible 3’ and ‘Alien 2’...

Roppongi Art Night
Things to do

Roppongi Art Night

The annual nocturnal celebration of all things art, Roppongi Art Night features an all-night line-up of outdoor installations, art events, live performances, cultural exhibitions and more...

Popular features and interviews

Guide to booking popular museums in Tokyo
Art

Guide to booking popular museums in Tokyo

How to get tickets for Tokyo's most hyped museums such as the Ghibli Museum, Yayoi Kusama Museum and teamLab Borderless

Guide to anime and manga culture in Tokyo
Art

Guide to anime and manga culture in Tokyo

Interested in anime and manga culture? Here's your guide to Tokyo's hidden otaku gems and attractions

Metsä
Attractions

Metsä

Until March 3rd, Metsä Village is playing host to teamLab's latest installation, 'Digitized Lakeside and Forest', an enormous installation that will...

The art of sento
Art

The art of sento

Tokyo’s prettiest public baths

What's on at...

teamLab Planets Tokyo
Art

teamLab Planets Tokyo

Tokyo Bay islands could best be termed 'teamLab islands' by now – hot off the heels of the much-hyped teamLab Borderless Museum on Odaiba, this temporary museum right next to Shin-Toyosu Station offers a more intimate interaction with the collective's signature digital art. Back in 2016, teamLab collaborated with e-commerce business DMM.com to create the very popular DMM.Planets exhibition; this museum is in essence an extension of that.  There are a mere seven installations, but they are spread out across a full 10,000sqm, giving them lots and lots of space each. All of them offer a more sensorial and immersive experience compared to the teamLab Borderless Museum nearby. We won't spoil all the secrets, but for starters, no shoes are allowed inside the museum, and you'll be wading through knee-deep water in some places. We'd highly recommend wearing something above the knee (although skirts may not be the best idea due to the amount of floor mirrors); the museum offers a wrap-around if needed. Even better, they are open until 1am, one of the few museums in Tokyo to be open that late.  Our only caveat remains the price tag: ¥3,200 for adults (and a whopping ¥6,000 for priority access), which is the same price as teamLab Borderless, which has 50-odd pieces to ogle at rather than seven. But hey, if you need more Insta likes... Book your tickets through their official website.  Opens July 7, 2018, through autumn 2020

Tokyo National Museum
Museums

Tokyo National Museum

If you have just one day to devote to museum-going in Tokyo and are interested in Japanese art and artefacts, this is the place to visit. Japan’s oldest and largest museum houses over 110,000 items. Past the ornate gateway, there’s a wide courtyard and pond surrounded by three main buildings. Directly in front is the Honkan, or main gallery, dating from 1938, which displays the permanent collection of Japanese arts and antiquities. The 25 rooms regularly rotate their exhibitions of paintings, ceramics, swords, kimonos, sculptures and the like. The Toyokan building to the right features five floors of artworks from other parts of Asia; the Hyokeikan, the 1909 European-style building to the left, is currently closed to visitors. Behind the Hyokeikan is the Gallery of Horyu-ji Treasures, which houses some of Japanese Buddhism’s most important and ancient artefacts, from the seventh-century Horyu-ji temple in Nara. The Heiseikan, behind the Honkan, holds three to four temporary exhibitions of Japanese and Asian art each year. There are also a couple of restaurants in the complex, and a good gift shop.

The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo
Art

The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

This is an alternative-history MoMA, one consisting mostly of Japanese art from the turn of the 20th century onwards. Noteworthy features of the permanent collection are portraits by early Japanese modernist Ryusei Kishida and wartime paintings. The 1969 building, designed by Yoshiro Taniguchi (father of architect Yoshio Taniguchi) was renovated in 2001. Its location next to the moat and walls of the Imperial Palace makes it a prime stop for viewing springtime cherry blossoms and autumn foliage. Nearby is the Crafts Gallery, an impressive 1910 European-style brick building, once the base for the legions of guards who patrolled the Imperial Palace.

Mori Art Museum
Art

Mori Art Museum

The exhibitions are world-class, focused mainly on contemporary culture, but the secrets of the Mori Art Museum’s success are location (part of the phenomenally popular Roppongi Hills), location (on the 52nd and 53rd floors of the Mori Tower, offering spectacular views) and location (within a two-floor ‘experience’ that includes a bar, cafe, shop and panoramic observation deck). One ticket allows access to all areas, and the late opening hours maximise accessibility. Exhibitions are deliberately varied, with past offerings including Bill Viola’s video art, a survey of the Middle Eastern art world and the periodic Roppongi Crossing group shows for Japanese artists. The vista from Tokyo City View isn’t quite 360°, and it’s expensive compared to the free Tokyo Metropolitan Government building observatory, but the views are arguably better, especially at night with a drink in your hand from Mado Lounge. If you don't mind paying an extra ¥500, you take a short elevator ride to the rooftop Sky Deck, and take in an even better – not to mention rather breezier – vista.

The National Art Center
Art

The National Art Center

The National Art Center was opened on January 21, 2007, boasting the largest exhibition space of any museum in Japan. Unlike most conventional domestic art galleries, the National Art Center does not have its own permanent collection, instead choosing to hold special exhibitions only. Entry to the Center’s atrium is free, and the space boasts a café, two restaurants and an excellent shop, Souvenir From Tokyo.

Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum
Art

Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum

Designed by Maekawa Kunio, this brick-faced art museum was largely constructed underground to remain unobtrusive, with limited success. Temporary shows in the main hall feature everything from traditional Japanese art to art nouveau.