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The best markets in Atlanta for produce, prepared foods and more

From farmers' markets to food halls, these are the best markets in Atlanta, each as delicious and colorful as the last

Written by
Gerrish Lopez
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Atlanta is a foodie dream, especially for lovers of fresh produce. The best markets in Atlanta range from neighborhood farmers' markets to gourmet food halls featuring some of Atlanta’s best restaurants and everything in between.

Hitting up the farmers' market is a weekend ritual in many Atlanta neighborhoods. Some might say it is worth forgoing the Atlanta breakfast and brunch scenes for some tasty morning grazing, although we'll let you decide that for yourself. These farmers' markets showcase the best of Georgia’s produce, from peanuts to peaches with plenty in between. Many farmers' markets have family-friendly activities too, making them a good option for things to do with kids in the city. 

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best things to do in Atlanta

Best markets in Atlanta

Grant Park is a beautiful place to stroll and enjoy nature any day, but it’s the place to be on Sunday mornings from April to December. Find some of the best locally-grown produce, bread, meats, coffee, sweets, and artisanal products. Stock up on fresh pasta, local honey, handmade butter, and more. Free demos feature well-known local chefs. Make a day of it and walk, shop, and picnic in Grant Park. 

One of Atlanta’s oldest farmers' markets, this one sets up shop Thursday evenings in a park across from the Midway Pub. In addition to locally-grown foods and artisanal products, the market hosts chef demos and tastings. The Edible Learning Garden offers garden education and activities for kids.

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The historic neighborhood of East Point is only 10 minutes from downtown, but it feels charmingly compact. The indoor/outdoor market is held year-round and features, in the words of the volunteers who run it, “artisan edibles and other curiosities.” You’ll find local produce, baked goods, eggs, meats, honey, coffee, chef demos, a food truck court, children’s activities, and much more. Vendors are friendly and welcoming, making it a real community event for neighbors and beyond. 

This Saturday extravaganza is the largest producer-only farmers' market in Georgia. More than 50 vendors sell fresh fruits, veggies, meats, cheeses, seafood, jams, sauces, coffee, and more. The market features artist vendors too. Popular restaurant chefs demonstrate how to prepare what is available at the market every week, a must for budding chefs (or total amateurs, obviously). Live music, baby animals, and other special events enhance the market. Each August, the market hosts the popular Ice Cream Social - featuring locally-made ice creams with unique local flavors - in collaboration with Slow Food Atlanta. 

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A relative newcomer, Freedom Farmers Market at the Carter Center was founded in 2014 by a small group of Farmers. Here you’ll find fresh produce and grass-fed meat, dairy products, farm-fresh eggs, handmade pasta, baked goods, coffee, and all the rest. The Saturday market is named for the nearby Freedom Park Trail, not to mention the credibility of the farmers who manage the market independently.

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From a small produce stand that opened in 1977 to today’s sprawling facility, Your DeKalb has become the metro area's go-to-market for international produce and goods. Hundreds of different fruits and veggies are available, many of which you may have never heard of. There is also an unbelievably vast selection of meat, seafood, and cheeses, plus bread and pastries baked daily, and prepared foods. 184 flags are displayed within the market, representing the sources of their products. Employees wear name tags identifying their home countries - from the U.S. to Mauritania to Ethiopia to Samoa. A trip to Your DeKalb Farmers Market doubles as a foodie trip around the world. 

Buford Highway is known for its international dining scene, with restaurants from all over the world. If you need something from another country, you’ll probably find it here. Get lost strolling the aisles, stopping to wonder at products you never knew existed. There’s a heavy focus on products from Asia and Latin America, and the numerous prepared foods provide a quick option for cheap eats. The market also hosts tastings from local Georgia producers.

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This massive, historic building was redeveloped to include shopping, entertainment, and a vibrant food hall. PCM’s Central Food Hall features snacks, prepared foods, fresh seafood, juices, sweets, and James Beard Award-winning chefs. Eat your way through Atlanta’s finest and buzziest all-in-one spot, from the famed Holeman & Finch burger to Hop's fried chicken and biltong jerky. Find all this plus fresh bread, Indian street food, gourmet hot dogs, doughnuts, fine wines, and more.

From April to November, Ponce City Market hosts a producer-only farmers' market that gathers local urban farmers for selling their home-grown products. All farmers use organic farming methods. You’ll find fresh fruits, veggies, meats, artisanal prepared foods, and natural beauty products. It’s held on Tuesday evenings, perfect for a healthy pick-me-up after work. 

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Head to Inman Park to check out this nationally-renowned food hall, housed in a rehabbed warehouse. Market stalls hawk seasonal produce, baked goods, and cheeses, alongside quick-order versions of the best from beloved Atlanta restaurants. Gu’s Dumplings and Richards’ Southern Fried hot chicken are absolute musts. Other options include tacos, bao, charcuterie, barbecue, and more, so grab a local craft beer from Hop City and pick a spot at a communal table for a friendly dining experience.

Referred to by locals as the “Curb Market,” due to its humble beginnings as a large, open-air tent called the Sweet Auburn Curb Market, the Municipal Market celebrated 100 years of magic back in 2018. Shop for high-quality produce, meats, seafood, bread, and sweets, or pick up something from one of the diverse eateries, from soul food to poke, to eat at a communal table. 

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