Your ultimate guide to Bangkok

Discover the best events, attractions, restaurants, bars, clubs and more in the city

10 rare Thai desserts you must try in Bangkok
Restaurants

10 rare Thai desserts you must try in Bangkok

Restaurants, markets and shops where you can eat rare Thai desserts in Bangkok.

The 8 best new beer bars in Bangkok
Bars

The 8 best new beer bars in Bangkok

Beer bars have been popping up all over Bangkok, especially in the past five years. And because we believe that happy hour should start with heavenly hops, we’ve scoped out the places that serve the best malted tipples in the city.

The 3 best new rooftop bars in Bangkok
Bars

The 3 best new rooftop bars in Bangkok

The best new rooftop bars in Bangkok.

New restaurants, cafés and bars to try in Bangkok this month
Restaurants

New restaurants, cafés and bars to try in Bangkok this month

Break your eating routines and check out these new restaurants, cafes and bars around Bangkok.

The evolution of sex in Thai movies
Movies

The evolution of sex in Thai movies

To celebrate the month of love and lust (and the Oscars), we look back through 90 years of Thai film history, examining controversial sex scenes, and the rise and fall of Thai bombshells.

คลิกที่นี่เพื่ออ่าน Time Out Bangkok ภาษาไทย

Latest restaurants and cafés review

KRBB
Restaurants

KRBB

The opening of a new Japanese restaurant on the third floor of Habito Mall seeks to take your hot pot experience to the next level.  KRBB, a play on the Thai word “krub,” is also the combined letters of the names of its four beef-loving owners: actor Chakrit “Krit” Yamnarm, Ronnasit Phumma, Ittichai “Big” Benjathanasombat and  Pratiroop “Book” Panpiemrasda. The eatery appeases millennial expectations with an Instagram-worthy space decked out with light-colored wooden furniture. A long communal table dominates the eating area. Meats are stored in display cabinets for you to choose from but are sliced in the adjacent butcher’s room.  Three types of wagyu—they claim to have some of the best from Japan—are available. The highlight is the Japanese Ozaki, a rare beef that is only grown on the farm of breeder Muneharu Ozaki in the Miyazaki prefecture. Also on offer is Oni, a legendary wagyu from Chika prefecture and Hokkaido’s F-1 premium beef. Your choice of meat is cooked to your preference (yakiniku-style, shabu-shabu or grilled).  KRBB also throws a special feast every month where some of the best chefs in the country take turn to create tasting menus that combine their signature cooking styles with KRBB’s premium beef (B4,500 with sake pairing). On 29 and 30 March, chef Weerawat Triyasenawat from Samuay and Sons in Udon Thani injects spicy Isan flavors into dishes like Hokkaido wagyu spicy pla salad served with ant’s eggs. 

Siam Tea Room
Restaurants

Siam Tea Room

The building that was the Imperial Queen’s Park Hotel has been entirely refurbished into the sleeker Bangkok Marriott Marquis Queen’s Park, a new five-star hotel that also promises to be a mecca for food and booze. One of its outlets, Siam Tea Room, looks to invite discerning diners to either feast on authentic Thai grub or nibble on a variety of baked items – or both. A northern Thai-style, wood-crafted gable graces the restaurant’s facade, one of the few decorating pieces kept from the Imperial Queen’s Park structure. It was only later on that we learned, as revealed by the hotel’s publicist, that the iconic piece was designed by the late legendary artist Thawan Duchanee. Stepping inside, the center of the room is unusually dedicated to a pastry shop selling house-baked goodies. The adjacent wings on both sides are connected to elegant, dark-hued dining rooms that display intricate Thai-style furniture and custom-made cutlery crafted by the villagers of Aranyik, a small town in Ayutthaya.  The name is quite deceptive — the main focus here is not tea. Rather, old-school Thai dishes, whipped up by chef Anukool “Aon” Poolpipat (who previously worked at JW Marriott) dominate the menu. Chef Aon doesn’t tone down the spice and delivers flavorful versions of Thai cuisine that sentimentally reflect the tastes of his childhood. The blue swimmer crab curry (B460) represents southern Thai fare at its best. Spicy with delicate salty notes, it is served with meaty crab chunks, charcoa

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Pâtissez
Restaurants

Pâtissez

The Freakshake, a milkshake of skyscraper proportions, has come to Bangkok, courtesy of newly opened Australian café Patissez. This intense, creamy concoction features thick slush, chunky cake bits, an overload of whipped cream and candy-colored toppings. Originally created by Pâtissez in 2015, this sinful and monstrous treat has spawned copies worldwide. Now, after expanding to Kuala Lumpur and Singapore, Pâtissez has set foot in Bangkok with the aim of reclaiming credit for its trademark product. Tucked on the ground floor of new lifestyle and residential complex Parc39, Patissez features rustic wooden furniture, indoor plants and a giant floor-to-ceiling glass window that allows plenty of natural light to filter in. The Freakshake (B230) is offered in five different flavors. Chocolate fiends will fall in love with the Pretzella, a Nutella-flavored milkshake topped with lots of whipped cream and pretzels. Only available in Bangkok is a Thai milk tea-inspired version that comes with ganache of white chocolate and a hint of coconut.  The café also serves all-day brunch dishes such as pork belly burger (pork pieces roasted with maple syrup, crispy taro and spicy mango salad, B380) and barbecued pork ribs served with crispy taro and mashed potatoes (B420). Plans are in motion to carry the Freakshake concept over to made-to-order birthday cakes. 

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Hazel’s Ice Cream Parlor and Fine Drinks
Restaurants

Hazel’s Ice Cream Parlor and Fine Drinks

An old shop which once was a printing house, has been transformed into a Prohibition-themed ice cream parlor selling frozen scoops that take on an alcoholic upgrade.  Hazel’s, the latest brainchild of Somkiat “Joke” Pairotmahakit (the man behind Seven Spoons, Sheepshank and Mad Moa), sits among other unassuming buildings in the bustling old town. The ice cream bar ticks all the boxes for vintage cool: bare concrete walls, wooden shelves stacked with antique bric-a-brac and a bar made of old-school card catalog drawers. An original Heidelberg printing press takes up much of the seating area on the first floor, embodying the history of its location.  The shop has teamed up with organic producer Farm to Table to come with their own ice cream flavors. Though Hazel’s brands itself as an alcohol-infused ice cream parlor, there were very few spiked options when we visited during the soft launch period, such as stout vanilla with salted caramel (B190/scoop), bourbon vanilla (B220/scoop) and rum raisin (B220). Also on offer are sundae selections like The Great Grandpa’s Sunday Sundae (bourbon vanilla ice cream, stout beer ice-cream, caramel brandy sauce, B280). Teetotalers with sugar cravings will be delighted as most of the sundaes and floats, like the All-American Apple Pie (vanilla ice cream served with apple pie crumble, B240), contain non-alcoholic ingredients.  The bar on the first floor slings whiskey-based concoctions. Try the Menthol Lethal (B350) which combines rye whiske

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Sushi Zo
Restaurants

Sushi Zo

Osaka-born sushi legend Keizo Seki introduced a more delicate approach to the American concept of raw fish and rice rolls when he opened the first Sushi Zo in West LA. The omakase-style eatery earned a Michelin star in 2009. After opening another branch in Los Angeles and one in New York, the much praised sushi brand is set to raise the bar in Bangkok’s fine-dining scene with the opening of its fourth establishment (and the first Asian outpost) on bustling Wireless Road. Hidden behind an indistinctive blond wood door in the Plaza Athénée Tower, Sushi Zo’s kitchen is helmed by Toshi Onishi, the former executive chef at the downtown LA branch.Unlike the more popular edomae (traditional Tokyo) style, which highlights the essential flavors of the fish, Sushi Zo focuses on different kinds of ponzu and soy sauce to dress and marinate the fish, and mix two types of vinegars in the rice. The outcome is an interplay of contrasting sweet and sour notes and a wellbalanced umami flavor that does not overpower the freshness of the fish, which are flown daily from Japan. Around 22 pieces of the freshest nigiri and sashimi take turns enticing your palate throughout the two-hour course. Our visit kicked off with an impressive sashimi platter consisting of Hokkaido oysters drenched in tangy-sweet ponzu sauce, scattered pieces of cornetfish (yagara), bluefin tuna and sweet shrimp drizzled and marinated with different condiments. The akami tuna was melt-in-yourmouth delicious, with a slight t

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
find more bangkok restaurants

Latest bars review

Ku Bar
Bars

Ku Bar

For first-timers, the experience of discovering this hidden gem in the Old Town can be quite spine-tingling. In a small alley by Brown Sugar jazz bar is an abandoned-looking building that sits behind a spirit house (it’s an ideal setting for a Thai horror film). A heavy gate leads to a spooky stairway that climbs up to a third floor. Slide open the wood-paneled door and the chilling journey immediately ends. The room beyond is as relaxing and as welcoming as it gets.  Ku is the brainchild of Anupas “Kong” Premanuwat (an alum of famous NYC speakeasy Angel’s Share and a pupil of the barmaster Shingo Gokan) and Elaine Sun, a former barista and a wine enthusiast. This hidden den strikes a charming balance between comfort and mystery. The bar is topped with a clean white marble surface and is decorated with only a few bottles on display.  Dim lighting emitting from the corners complement the eerie glow cast by a light installation.  The concoctions are simply named after local ingredients, some of which are found at the nearby old markets. Kunchai/Melon (B350) manifests an interplay between savory, tart and sweet notes with a mix of tequila, juice from Chinese celery and honeydew, Tabasco sauce and absinthe spray. The classic Adonis cocktail is given an elegant touch and transformed into Rose (Fino sherry, rose-infused vermouth and rose water, B360). A decadent chocolate drink is upgraded into a libation with the combination of banana-infused liquor, Fernet Branca, sweet vermout

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Foudejoie
Restaurants

Foudejoie

For years, these Chinese merchants (a father and his son) ran the Foojohn Company on Charoenkrung Soi 31. When they decided to discontinue the business, a group of entrepreneurs swooped in to acquire the classic five-story shophouse the company was located in, preventing the razing of yet another heritage structure. Keeping the name Foojohn, the shophouse has been reincarnated as a retro-style, East-meets-West restaubar. The first and second floors are now complete, unveiled as a bar called Foudejoie, while the top floors are dedicated to a beer bar and asteakhouse to be managed by adifferent group. Walk into Foudejoie and you are greeted with dim lighting and anostalgic vibe set to mimic a ’70s Hong Kong-style bistro. Decked out with a long wall-length mirror, booth seats and old-school mosaic tiles, it’s a setting you can easily imagine in one of Hong Kongese director Wong Kar-wai’s films. Expect light, Parisian-style bites such as cured meat and cheese served on a chopping board, as well as savory and sweet crêpes. Go forthe Parisienne, which combines dried ham, raclette cheese, egg and chives (B200) or the Foie Gras (B240),which plays up the creamy texture of goose liver bits mixed with the bittersweet tang of liquor-infused raisins. The bistro also prides itself on its affordable selection oftop-quality French wines (startsfrom B140/a glass). Upstairs, a Prohibition-themed cocktail bar is lorded over by chatty French mixologist Antoine Loubry. Disclosing a preference

Dim Dim
Bars

Dim Dim

The hyped-up food and booze district of Sukhumvit 33 recently welcomed Dim Dim, a Chinese-inspired bar that replaced the modern Taiwanese eatery Bao & Buns. Situated next to Peppina pizzeria, the dimly-lit cocktail hub features a vintage-style, red-lit setting decorated with Oriental teahouse furniture and shelves lined with East Asian clichés like Japanese lucky cat charms, Chinese tea sets and jars storing exotic-looking herbs. Barmen in white lab coats, however, add a modern, quirky edge to the vibe. Manned by the Sugar Ray team, the bar menu sticks to Dim Dim’s Asian-inspired vibe by incorporating Chinese herbs into the concoctions it slings together. Oolong tea (B280), for instance, is given a sweet and boozy kick with oolong- and orange peel-infused bourbon, orange and cardamom syrup, lemon and egg white, while the classic cocktail Clover Club (B280) is given a herbal spin and transformed into a rosella-infused gin-based drink. For more spirit-forward items, go for Bakkwa Old Fashioned (rosemary-infused bourbon with chili and cinnamon syrup, orange bitters and orange peel, B340). Garnished with sweet meat jerky, chili and sesame oil, every sip is a medley of sweet, savory and spicy flavors. The bar also serves house-made herbal liqueur like chrysanthemum vodka (B280) and salted plum gin (B280), which can be enjoyed as shots or on the rocks. No need to pop by the pizzeria next door if you feel peckish. Dim Dim whips up flavorful Asian comfort food, such as a silky-sm

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Golden Coins Taproom
Bars

Golden Coins Taproom

After ardous attempts to make their brand legit in Thailand, Golden Coins take things a step further by bringing their kegs to a taproom concept with an eponymous named bar.  It was a long journey for founder Pieak Pipattanaphon, who started the brand in 2011, pioneering the local craft beer industry and becoming one of the first-talked about Thai craft beers. In 2015, he opend Let The Boy Die in the Chinatown, the first bar in Bangkok to serve only Thai craft beer on tap. The future of Thai craft beer still remains uncertain, with many Thai brewers, including Golden Coins, needing to partner up with local breweries in neighboring countries to produce batches of beer before importing them back to Thailand just to make the entire process more legal. Replacing the old spot of Butterscotch ice cream shop at Ekkamai Shopping Mall, Golden Coins Taproom features six taps dedicated to the brand's different beer styles (in the future you can expect more brews on rotation). Golden Coins is known for their IPA and Pale Ale beers, and beer lovers would do themselves a favor by trying the Wish Do, an American-style Pale Ale brew. The Happy Stout is another blockbuster. Containing five percent stout, this style is easy to drink and smells just like cookies and cream — it may actually be a little too sweet if you're more into bitter IPAs. (Beers start from B180/glass.) The food menu has more variety than in Let The Boy Die, combining a range of beer chow from all over the world. You can

find more bangkok bars and pubs

New movie releases

Beauty and the Beast
Movies

Beauty and the Beast

The virtue of courage is high up on the list of Disney princess must-haves. So three cheers for Dreamgirls director Bill Condon and star Emma Watson for having the courage to make a live-action musical adaptation of Disney's adored Beauty and the Beast with 2017 gender politics and a diverse cast. 

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
It's Only the End of the World
Movies

It's Only the End of the World

At what point do we stop referring to prolific Quebecois director-writer-actor Xavier Dolan as a wunderkind? He's still only 27, but with six feature films under his belt, he already feels like a veteran. His latest, It's Only the End of the World, is unfortunately his worst by a wide margin, talky and unsatisfying. 

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
The Last Face
Movies

The Last Face

You begin to suspect The Last Face might be bad when the muddled intro text links the suffering of Liberia and South Sudan with a "common romance."

Time Out says
  • 1 out of 5 stars
Kong: Skull Island
Movies

Kong: Skull Island

It’s 1973 and his character, a government-funded conspiracy nut, is talking about weather-shrouded Skull Island, deep in the South Pacific and only recently discovered by satellite. 

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars

The latest Time Out interviews

Q&A with Ludi Lin
Movies

Q&A with Ludi Lin

The Chinese-Canadian newcomer steps into the role of Zack Taylor, aka Black Ranger, in the remake of the Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers. 

Buakaw punching through silver screen
Movies

Buakaw punching through silver screen

Buakaw Banchamek steps out of the boxing ring and, once again, lands his foot on the big screen

Q&A with Flure
Music

Q&A with Flure

The Thai pop band’s official reunion after nine years is making fans weep for joy

Q&A with Peem Jaiyen
Movies

Q&A with Peem Jaiyen

Peem Jaiyen opens up about his dark side in HBO Asia's new series Halfworlds

Where to stay in Bangkok

W Bangkok
Hotels

W Bangkok

One of the franchise of the well-known W Hotel, W Bangkok integrated Thai Culture with Western style  beautifully throughout the hotel and its facilities. A Boxing ring is used to separate the VIP zone at Woobar. The elevator is decorated colorfully inspired by the light of Tuk Tuk. Hanuman, from Thai myth, welcomes all the guest in front of SWEAT fitness. Not to mention their exquisite service, W retains their concept of Whatever/Whenever to keep all customer pleased.

Sala Arun
Hotels

Sala Arun

Sala Arun is hiding in a corner of the old community of Ta Tien. This small boutique hotel offers the stunning view right across the beautiful Wat Arun, the Temple of Dawn. You can also make the most of the view by enjoying their custom cocktails from the sun rise to the sunset.

Baannai
Hotels

Baannai

The restaurant has everything from familiar menus such as Nam Prik Long Rua serving together with vegetables, Thai omlette and bitter melon soup with minced pork. The others are quite rare to see in normal Thai restaurant. The best bet would be Pla Haeng Tangmo, diced watermelon with crispy little fish is perfect for summer while Kanom Pa Pai, the rare Thai dessert making of green beans is so yummy that 5 pieces are barely enough. Here also serves monthly special menu as Khao Chae in April. We’re still waiting for the new menu in May but we are so ready for this mysterious dish.

Silom Art Hostel
Hotels

Silom Art Hostel

Silom Art Hostel changes your mind about all hostels being “risky, too public and dissatisfying.” Giving off the vibe of a boutique hotel, this colorful, unique four-story building was decorated by an experienced architect who plays a big role in designing many of the city’s upscale hotels. Here, the desire and imagination inspired by Bangkok is reflected in every little detail. The mezzanine features a cozy TV room and a small sized business center, as well as a comfy-looking hammock. Different types of rooms are available: shared rooms and bathrooms, ensuite rooms with twin beds or king-sized beds. The fourth floor houses the women’s dormitory, which requires a keycard to enter. Ladies don’t have to worry about security anymore.