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Dimensions Festival

Your essential guide to Dimensions Festival, with exclusive interviews, reviews, competitions, local area guides and more...

© Dan Medhurst
Eliphino's Dimensions Festival playlist
Music

Eliphino's Dimensions Festival playlist

Nu-garage prodigy Eliphino is no stranger to Dimensions: over the last few years, he's enjoyed the festival from both sides of the decks as a performer and a punter. To help you get your ears prepared for this year's edition, he's put together a definitive Dimensions Festival playlist based on some personal favourites. RECOMMENDED: Music festival guide 2016

Hiatus Kaiyote interview
Music

Hiatus Kaiyote interview

There’s a more eclectic, more experimental, jazzier sort of sound that has broken through R&B in recent years, like Flying Lotus and Thundercat; then there’s the Banks, FKA Twigs, Frank Ocean, How To Dress Well, Miguel etc. fronted movement of alternative, commercial avant garde R&B; and then there’s the dynamic sensibility of Australian neo-soul quartet Hiatus Kaiyote with their critically-acclaimed albums (earning rave reviews from Erykah Badu, Prince and Questlove), their 2013 Grammy nod (thanks to their track ‘Nakamarra’ featuring A Tribe called Quest legend Q-Tip), and their signing with Salaam Remi, who served as the executive producer for sophomore album ‘Choose Your Weapon’. We say ‘neo-soul’, but truth be told, Hiatus Kaiyote seamlessly switches between the blend of jazz and swing, to abstract hip hop, soul vocals, to electronic flourishes; 2015’s ‘Choose Your Weapon’ is worldly and wonderful, taking influences from latin, samba, and West African funk. It’s a dense, ever-shifting soundscape – as soon as the album appears to settle on a groove, it just as quickly ups and leaves it – that introduces an aural bloom before traversing along gritty basslines, synths, and progressive riffs over a colourful, wide canvas, paced by intros and interludes. Tip: standout tracks include FlyLo-inspired ‘Borderline With My Atoms’, extended intro (‘Creations Part One’) and all, ‘Breathing Underwater’, and ‘Fingerprints’. Ahead of the band’s debut gig in KL this September, we speak to

Outlook and Dimensions: Interview with founder Joe Barnett
Music

Outlook and Dimensions: Interview with founder Joe Barnett

Outlook and Dimensions entertain thousands at the atmospheric site of Fort Punta Christo: we speak to the man who started it all

Heading to Pula?

Pula area guide
Travel

Pula area guide

Things to do in Pula
Things to do

Things to do in Pula

The must-see attraction is, of course, Pula’s amphitheatre. Set a short walk north of the city centre, its outer walls are remarkably preserved, and a wonderful backdrop for the concerts that take place here. You get a sense of the gladiatorial contests held here until AD 400, particularly when you go down to the corridors on the sea-facing side where the lions were kept. Through a long tunnel lined with Roman masonry, you’ll now find a few displays about olive oil production and a rather detailed map of Via Flavia, which connected Pula with Trieste. Outside is a modest souvenir shop with the same opening hours as the arena. The second of the Roman attractions stands at the south-east entrance to the town centre. The Arch of the Sergians, or Golden Gate, was built in 30 BC. Its most notable aspects are the reliefs of grapes and winged victories on the inner façade. Passing through the arch and past the statue of James Joyce, marking where the author taught in 1904-05, you walk down the Roman-era high street, the Sergijevaca. It leads to the heart of Pula, the Roman Forum, Temple of Augustus and nearby mosaic. The Forum, still the main square, is today lined with cafés, the Town Hall, tourist office and, lining the far side, the six classical Corinthian columns of the Temple of Augustus. Inside is a modest collection of Roman finds. The floor mosaic, hidden away behind a carpark, dates to the second century AD and has geometric motifs as well as a depiction of the Punishment

Pula beaches
Things to do

Pula beaches

Central Pula has no beaches itself but it does not take long to reach some pleasant spots of coastline. The nearest ones at Stoja and along Lungomare between Veruda and Valsaline are adequate, but if you’re having to take a city bus (Nos.1 and 4 respectively) to get there, you may as well take the Nos.2A and 3A to Verudela, its nicer shingle beaches and best-in-town lunches. If you’ve come for a beach holiday, leave Pula for Medulin and the windsurfing centre of Premantura, both a quick and regular bus journey from Pula, on the Nos.25 and 26 respectively. Beyond Premantura is the beautiful Kamenjak peninsula, at the very southern tip of Istria. Another option is Fratarsko island. In summer locals decamp here permanently, spending nights under canvas among the shady pines and commuting to the city by ferry. There are free showers there, too. Ferries from Bunarina, heaving with sun worshippers for the ten-minute crossing, run every 20 minutes or so in the height of summer. Fares are nominal. The major excursion for tourists from the town of Pula is to the attractive and somewhat bonkers Brijuni Islands.

Great Pula restaurants
Restaurants

Great Pula restaurants

Downtown Pula has a handful of reasonable restaurants; those on the outskirts, in Verudela and Stoja, also offer a sea view. In town, Amfiteatar and Vodnjanka come recommended, as does Ribarska Koliba, a favourite among fish-eating locals.

Pula bars and café guide
Nightlife

Pula bars and café guide

Pula’s many good bars, cafés and nightspots are not always in prominent locations. P14 and Scandal Express are classic downtown bars the discerning first-time visitor would never find – but would be delighted once they do. Towards Verudela, where Budučinova and Tomasinijeva meet, is a hub of terrace venues.

Pula nightlife guide
Nightlife

Pula nightlife guide

For mainstream clubbing, arrange for the taxi driver to head north-east of the centre. The best venue there is Aruba, with a bar outdoors and crowded two-room disco inside. The Zen Club is similarly funky if quite mainstream, although admission is free. Heading south of the centre towards the hotel zone of the Verudela peninsula, the summer-only beach bar and restaurant Ambrela was renovated in 2009 and invites DJs to thump out house, hip hop and techno while punters enjoy the terrace view over a stony beach. Club Uljanik  right in the city centre has been going since the ’60s and still boasts a strong year-round roster of alternative bands and DJ nights, and opens up a big outdoor terrace in summer. Indy gigs and alternative club nights also take place in the basement of the Rojc Centre, although you should check the schedule before making tracks. Habsburg-era navel forts count among Pula’s most compelling nightlife destinations: Fort Bourguignon near Valsaline Bay hosts regular summer DJ events; while Fort Punta Christo, north along the coast, is the site of the Outlook and Dimensions festivals, and the seasonal Seasplash Summer Club

Pula hotel and accommodation guide
Hotels

Pula hotel and accommodation guide

Downtown Pula has a handful of mostly rather modest hotels. The classy options are all 5km south of town in Verudela, which is accessible by bus Nos.2A and 3A, or with a 60kn taxi ride. Here the four-star Park Plaza Histria Pula, three-star Palma and a clutch of other resort hotels are run by local tourism concern Arenaturist For a more intimate stay, boutique B&B Valsabbion lies across the bay in Pješčana Uvala.

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