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Love Local Time Out
Photograph: Time Out

Love Local: Time Out Miami celebrates local shops, food and culture

We’re shining a light on independent makers and small businesses that make our city a great place to live

Written by
Time Out Miami editors
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Hi Miami!

It’s a whole new world out there. We’ve seemingly made it through the worst of it and are seeing our city continue to open back up and thrive. As shops and restaurants regain their footing, it’s important to double-down on our efforts to support Miami’s businesses like never before.

That’s why this year, we’re putting our effort into supporting local.

Whether it’s dining at one of the best restaurants in Miami or buying flowers from your favorite florist, every day is an opportunity to show up for local businesses.

And we’ll be there to guide you through. Our editors have been seeking out the best of city life since 1968. We know that our cities are nothing without their restaurants, cafés, bars, theatres, music venues, nightclubs, cinemas, art galleries—and all the other local, independently run places where people come together to eat, drink, laugh, think, create, cut loose and fall in love.

You can now vote for your favorite spots for the awards here! We want to hear from you! We need your help to decide Miami's favorite restaurant, bar, independent store and more. Vote now and vote often. 

Our ongoing Love Local campaign shines a light on the people, places and establishments doing their best to survive during these difficult times. We’re using our platform to share their stories and all of the ways you can support them.

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram to learn more about the incredible things that Miami local businesses are doing. Below, check out our Love Local campaign in action.  

Virginia Gil
Time Out Miami
editor

Love Local: How you can support local businesses in Miami

  • Things to do
  • City Life

South Beach’s long-awaited Rooftop Cinema Club is finally opening next month. We shared news of the arrival of Miami’s first rooftop theater back in February, when organizers announced the outdoor movie series was set to open in South Beach atop 1212 Lincoln Road. It was a long time in the making as Miami marked the globally recognized club's ninth location, which includes cinemas in London, New York, Los Angeles and San Diego. Fast forward a few months, and the “social to cinema” is ready to welcome guests on June 2! The Rooftop Cinema Club’s June schedule is live on its website and tickets are on sale now for guests 18 years and older (no kids allowed, unfortunately). Highlights include 10 Things I Hate About You on opening night (June 2); The Birdcage to celebrate Pride Month (June 10) and Love & Basketball in honor of Juneteenth (June 19). Showings take place daily except for Mondays and there will be two screenings per night. Your ticket includes access to comfy seats (either single Adirondack chairs or loungers) and wireless headphones to ensure the sound is crystal clear and the volume is just right.  As a born and bred Miamian, I don’t understand why a rooftop of any kind would choose to open in June, on the precipice of Miami’s rainiest months and mere weeks from the start of hurricane season. On the bright side, most of the snowbirds are gone by the start of summer, which means we locals might actually have a shot at scoring tickets to something before the transplan

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Coconut Grove is enjoying a renaissance, and we love to see it. Now that renovations on CocoWalk have been completed (which introduced new restaurants like The Key Club), the neighborhood’s iconic Mayfair Hotel & Spa is the next development soon to be on the scene with a fresh look. Opened in 1985—during one of the neighborhood’s peak eras—the indoor/outdoor hotel debuted with an impressive courtyard and lush garden, unlike anything the city had ever seen before. This summer, it’ll build on architect Kenneth Treister’s unique original design and reopen as the Mayfair House Hotel & Garden, where every guest will get to enjoy the experience of escaping to a private oasis. Conceived as an all-suite hotel by New York-based interior design studio Goodrich, the new Mayfair will boast home-like suites, each with a private terrace, a living room and a separate sleeping area. Art will also feature prominently on the property thanks to newly commissioned murals by Verre Églomisé artist Jane Richardson-Mack, Bahamian visual artist Angelika Wallace-Whitfield and Miami-born Michele Oka Doner. The biggest change for locals who recall the original Mayfair will be in food and drink, which, admittedly, was never memorable. Lost Boy & Co., the hospitality group behind Miami heavy-hitters Tropezón and Lost Boy Dry Goods, is spearheading the property’s two new concepts. The namesake Mayfair Grill is slated to be a picturesque garden café in the hotel’s atrium, serving up wood-fired cuisine inspi

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Remember when Miami had, like, two wine bars? Thankfully, it’s nearly impossible to imagine a time when viniculture didn’t have such a chokehold on the city the way it does now. It’s even tougher to recall the days when beloved Vinya Wine wasn’t in existence. The popular Key Biscayne bar and restaurant—with an outpost at Time Out Market Miami—will be bringing smiles to even more wine-loving faces this month: Vinya Table, its second brick-and-mortar location, is opening in Coral Gables on May 11. You may remember the team's brief pandemic pop-up on the Mile but now Vinya is making things official with a fully developed, 152-seat restaurant also on Miracle Mile. The expansive 3,200-square-foot space comprises main and private dining rooms, a bar area and a market selling a curated selection of wine from all over the world. Photograph: Courtesy Vinya Table In keeping with its Key Biscayne location, Vinya Table serves a New American menu created by chef Mariano Araya, which ranges from small plates to snack on while you sip wine to larger entrées to enjoy as part of a full meal. Think mussels soaked in Pernod cream served with a crusty baguette for dipping, manchego and truffle risotto, and a sizeable 42-ounce tomahawk steak. Cofounder and experienced sommelier Allegra Angelo has a hand in choosing what you'll be drinking, from the extensive by-the-glass wine program to enjoy on-premises to the 40 Wines Under $40 collection of bottles available to-go to the cocktail essentials

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

We love a good redemption story, especially one that involves one of our favorite Miami bars. In September of last year, downtown bar and restaurant Over Under closed after only 14 months in business. According to their Instagram stories, the closure was temporary while the team sorted out some “zoning issues tied to bar sales.” But then—as we awaited news of their imminent reopening—the New Times went in, as it does. In December, the paper reported that the bar had been shut down by police for operating without the proper license. It’s a long story, both the New Times’ piece (which you can read in full here) and what actually happened, according to co-owner Brian Griffiths, who summed it up for us succinctly: “long story medium, we worked with bad people.” There were construction consultants, permit expeditors and attorneys, all of whom dispensed the wrong advice, which led to an incorrect zoning permit as a restaurant rather than a bar. Griffiths maintains that, despite the chatter, the bar did in fact have a liquor license but it wasn’t applied to their location. We are stubborn and fight really hard and care a lot. “We followed our then attorney's advice on how to proceed with our opening (after 3.5 years and any money we ever had or dreamed of having) in the middle of the pandemic and it turned out to be incorrect,” he says. The City of Miami took more than a year to process the approval, he says, at which point Over Under was repeatedly fined for illegal alcohol sales

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Ariete Hospitality Group (AHG) is laying claim on a beloved Miami gastropub, The Mighty. Slated to open in summer 2022, the long-running beer bar-turned-restaurant on Coral Way becomes The Gibson Room, a neighborhood tavern where folks can find elevated pub fare, live music and an evolved cocktail program, spearheaded by AHG beverage director Tom Lasher-Walker. Michael Beltran (Ariete, Taurus, Chug's), the group’s chef and founder, grew up in the neighborhood where he plans to open The Gibson Room, making this one of his most personal projects to date. “My grandparents still live just a few blocks away so this neighborhood is a special place for me and my family,” says Beltran, adding “I want to create a space for the community where people can hang out.” Part of that has to do with entertainment, which he’s planned for with a packed schedule of live performances and musical events, such as vinyl nights. Though, like most of AHG’s ventures, The Gibson Room’s success will rest on the food. For that, Beltran has tapped longtime collaborator chef Kris Huseby, who previously worked with him at Michael Schwartz’s Cypress Room. “He was the first person I thought of when we decided to transform The Mighty into The Gibson Room. He’s talented and a strong leader with a great sense of the concept,” says Beltran. The duo devised a menu of shareable pub grub, like hush puppies with a side of guava foie butter, crispy duck with scallion pancakes, uni popcorn and grilled oysters with chile

  • Things to do
  • City Life

It’s true that tourists see more of Miami than locals do. If we’re being honest, the last time many of us stepped foot inside Vizcaya was to either attend a wedding or to get our quinceañera portraits taken. Shame on us. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Miami Attraction & Museum Months make it more convenient and affordable for locals and tourists to explore the city. The annual initiative, hosted by the Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau (GMCVB), provides discounted admission to some of the best cultural experiences in Miami—including the aforementioned Vizcaya Museum & Gardens, Zoo Miami and other top-rated attractions in Miami. Taking advantage of the deal is easy. First, you’ll want to look up the venue you’re interested in visiting on the GMCVB’s Miami Temptations website. There you’ll get specifics on deals, such as which places offer BOGO on admission (HistoryMiami does, for instance) and which places treat you to sweet deals, like discounted airboat rides at Everglades National Park. Miami Attraction & Museum Months kicked off on April 1 and runs all way through May 31st. Check below for a full list of participating locations in Miami. Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County Ancient Spanish Monastery Art Deco Museum Artechouse Coral Gables Museum Deering Estate Florida Grand Opera Flamingo Adventures at Everglades National Park Fruit & Spice Park Gold Coast Railroad Museum HistoryMiami Museum Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU Lowe Art

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

It’s easy to love the things you can’t have, or can only get for a limited time, like Knaus Berry Farm’s cinnamon rolls, which regularly sell out. The irresistible baked goods you’ll most definitely have to stand in line for always play hard to get. If you’re not waiting in line to get them then you’re waiting for them to come back—the farm and bakery are only open from November through April. Harder to get your hands on than a Knaus Berry cinnamon roll? One that’s been stuffed into the Salty Donut’s signature 24-hour brioche dough. It’s the annual dessert collab Salty/Knaus fans wait all year for, and the one that verifiably draws crowds and, it goes without saying, always sells out. But we have some good news: this might be the year you won’t have to wait in line and can still enjoy the sweet taste of victory.  Photograph: Courtesy The Salty Donut This Friday, Salty Donut is introducing a special online ordering system for the very first time, giving die-hards like you the chance to buy the Salty x Knaus Berry Farm bun duo before it officially launches on Monday, March 28 for a full week. So, how does it work? You’ll log onto the website and place an order during the preview weekend, March 25–28, for pick up the next day. The menu will be updated at 8pm each night so be sure to set an alarm and get those digits ready. This year’s drop, a mini salted caramel sticky bun and a mini cinnamon roll, will be available in all Miami locations (South Miami and Wynwood) as well as O

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Two things Miami could always have more of: speakeasies and sandwich shops. Next month, it’s getting both in one at the Mad Butcher, an all-day gourmet sandwich shop that hides a secret, upscale lounge behind its walk-in cooler in the back. Restaurateurs Kim Wood (of several Norman Van Aken properties) and Coco Coig (Le Chick), along with partner Victor Palacios, set out to fill a void in Miami’s nightlife scene. "The Mad Butcher is meant to fill a gap as a triple-threat offering that marries delicious food, great drinks, and thoughtful music curation complete with a posh spot to enjoy them," says Wood. During the day, the sandwich shop serves 10 classic sandwiches from around the world, including a Vietnamese bánh mi, a Venezuelan reina pepiada, a Philly cheesesteak, a Spanish choripan and a Cubano. Old-fashioned soft-serve ice cream and homemade pies round out the food offerings. Photograph: Courtesy the Mad Butcher In the evening, guests can make their way through the shop’s walk-in cooler to find the club, a hidden lounge with plush velvet banquettes glowing under disco lights. Beverage director Andi Cruzatti helms the retro-themed bar, where you’ll find drinks like La Vie en Rose made with rose-infused Ketel One vodka, That’s Amore with chocolate rum and Cazadores reposado tequila and Catch Me If You Can with gin and an Ume Plum Liqueur float. The Mad Butcher is located at 2300 NW Second Ave and opens on daily from 11am to 2:30am on April 6. Have a look at what’s in s

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  • Comedy
  • Comedy

It’s after 2 o’clock in the afternoon when we hook up with Brittany Brave, and she’s just finishing up breakfast at Mamey in Coral Gables. She polished off a coffee, a mimosa, coconut water, tuna tostones, and grilled cheese bites—all with the desperate hope of beating the hangover. Having just barely answered the phone, she’s already apologizing profusely for sleeping through multiple alarms and jumping on the call late. “I don’t know what I was thinking scheduling a 10am Monday phone call.” You can’t blame her. The night before, 31-year-old Brave had headlined the Miami Improv for the first time, all part of what seems to be a major moment for this homegrown comedienne. In the past year, Brave has racked up headlining spots and accolades including being named by the Miami New Times as the city’s best comedian. Is this officially a thing? “Um, yeah, I am afraid—well, first off thank you for saying that—but I’m afraid to use language like that,” Brave says. “You never want to jinx it, and you never want to think you’re ahead of where you are.” Up until recently, she was a starving artist. “Sometimes literally starving,” she says. And as such, she doesn't want to ruin things. Brave grew up in west Kendall, the only child of a cosmetologist mom and sales manager dad. Her parents remain the funniest people she knows, she says, and she figured out early on that she loved making them laugh. Some of her earliest memories are of standing in the middle of the room at get-togethers an

  • Music
  • Music

It's a collective listening experience unlike anything Miami—and maybe the world—has experienced before. As music director at Dante's HiFi, the intimate Wynwood speakeasy where the soundtrack (and the system it plays from) reigns supreme, DJ Rich Medina culls from more than 40 years behind the decks and a personal record collection hovering somewhere around 40,000. But it's not just about setting the mood or making people move here. “I've been collecting records since I was nine years old,” says Medina, who came up in Philadelphia during the height of hip hop's golden era and the birth of neo-soul. Overall, he estimates about a third of his personal record collection lives at Dante's now, lining the walls behind the bar all the way up to the ceiling. “It's a smattering of the cream of the crop of just about every genre in my possession,” he says. Photograph: Courtesy Dante's HiFi/World Red Eye Inspired by the hidden away listening bars of Tokyo, this 50-seat venue caters to an audiophile crowd, folks who crave spine tingles that only the perfectly warm crackle of a vinyl record can induce. Unlike traditional high-fidelity listening bars, where the selector lets a record spin from beginning to end and conversation in the room keeps hushed, Dante's plays it a bit more off the cuff. When Medina is in the booth, tracks from different records talk to each other and, in between, guests get treated to a trove of knowledge on each selection. From where and when it came from to how

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