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Illustration: Geo Law

Love Local: Time Out Miami celebrates local shops, food and culture

We’re shining a light on independent makers and small businesses that make our city a great place to live

Written by
Time Out Miami editors
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Hi Miami,

It’s a whole new world out there. We’ve seemingly made it through the worst of it and are seeing our city continue to open back up and thrive. As shops and restaurants regain their footing, it’s important to double-down on our efforts to support Miami’s businesses like never before.

That’s why this year, we’re putting our effort into supporting local.

Whether it’s dining at one of the best restaurants in Miami or buying flowers from your favorite florist, every day is an opportunity to show up for local businesses.

And we’ll be there to guide you through. Our editors have been seeking out the best of city life since 1968. We know that our cities are nothing without their restaurants, cafés, bars, theatres, music venues, nightclubs, cinemas, art galleries—and all the other local, independently run places where people come together to eat, drink, laugh, think, create, cut loose and fall in love.

Our ongoing Love Local campaign shines a light on the people, places and establishments doing their best to survive during these difficult times. We’re using our platform to share their stories and all of the ways you can support them.

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram to learn more about the incredible things that Miami local businesses are doing. Below, check out our Love Local campaign in action.  

Virginia Gil
Time Out Miami
editor

Love Local: How you can support local businesses in Miami

  • Art
  • Art

There may come a time in your life when suddenly that sweet print of the Eiffel Tower you scored from Z Gallerie starts to not exactly look your age. Then there’s that questionable painting from the art fair, and, oh yeah, the paint-by-numbers thing you muddled through after two (or was it three?) glasses of wine. Now that you’ve realized you must, how do you step up what decorates your walls? If you’re clueless about the next steps to become an actual art collector, it turns out you’re not alone: A Miami nonprofit called Commissioner is working with a small group of people who are new to collecting. The goal is to teach them how to take the first steps into the world of original art. Commissioner came about after a conversation in 2017 between friends Dejha Carrington and Rebekah Monson. Carrington recalls: “She asked me one day how someone like her could learn more about collecting, and it was really that question that was personal to her that helped identify that there was a greater need in the community.” The two of them started imagining a model that would use a pool of money from a group of people to commission original art. It’s a bit like a community-supported agriculture program, where a bunch of people chip in to support and buy produce from local farmers. It’s also, Carrington says, inspired by a Caribbean susu, a tradition where women chip in money to do community projects. Their idea was good enough to score a couple of grants, including $90,000 from the Knight F

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Real talk: Miami could be a challenging place to live. Traffic is next-level stressful, rent is too high and everybody’s always from somewhere else. Thank God, then, for places. That tiny cafeteria serving life-affirming cafecito out of a window. That restaurant that still lets you in without a reservation. And, of course, the bar you can’t live without. Now we want to hear about them all. Time Out is launching its annual Love Local Awards today. They’re your chance to tell us about your favorite theatre, museum, bar, restaurant or anything, to give it the exposure it deserves, to show it the love. You can nominate as many venues as you like, of whatever type. Once the nominations are in, you’ll get a chance to vote on the ones you think are the stars of Miami. We’ll feature the most loved ones in Time Out, and those outstanding small businesses–the Time Out Love Local Award Winners of 2021–a valuable free marketing and advertising package to help them thrive. They’ve had a downright awful 18 months, after all. Launching simultaneously in 14 cities across Europe and North America this year, the Love Local Awards are part of Time Out’s commitment to inspire connection and joy by capturing the soul of the world’s greatest cities and support independent businesses, while offering them a platform to give them the recognition they deserve. The 2021 Love Local Awards nominations are open from October 26 until November 5. You can vote from November 11 to December 17, and the awards

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  • Things to do

We want to hear about the local places you love. Maybe it’s the little coffee shop that always makes your morning better. Or that fantastic local museum, with the community vibes and events. It could be an amazing food spot that you recommend to incoming friends and fam. Or a bold local gallery or theater, a community-spirited garden-cum-café, a vintage shop, a cheesemonger, a bar or music venue. Or even all of the above. If you love it, tell us about it today. We’ll list and feature those places on Time Out. And, as it’s been a tough 18 months, we’ll offer your most-loved spots—the Time Out Love Local Award Winners of 2021—a free marketing and advertising package to help them thrive. Let’s share the love! Virginia Gil, Time Out Miami editor    // window.beOpAsyncInit = function() { BeOpSDK.init({ account: "5f69f55f46e0fb0001fde886" }); BeOpSDK.watch(); }; //

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Miami is hot right now—literally (I’m sweating just typing this) and figuratively. Sure, our city has always been caliente, but with the influx of northeasterners, major tech companies, award-winning restaurant concepts and more, it’s truly on fire. Now if you’re a transplant, you’re likely spending your time snatching up the most coveted dinner reservations on South Beach or snapping graffiti selfies in Wynwood—and while I’ve got nothin’ but love for these neighborhoods, I’m simply here to tell you that there’s more where that came from! Sure, South Beach has some fab restaurants, fun bars, beautiful beaches, unparalleled people-watching and then some, but over the bridge, you’ll see a whole different side of Miami often reserved for proper locals. Today, I’m here to lift the curtain on a less hyped, yet equally enticing part of Miami you’ll want to explore ahora mismo. Brickell, dear Brickell…my stomping grounds and the place I’ve called home for nearly a decade (damn, I feel old). Am I biased about Brickell? Hell yes. But am I right about its grandeur? Also, yes. So now that I’ve likely overhyped the hell out of it, let me tell you why Brickell’s got it goin’ on. Whether you’re looking for a great place to indulge or a spot to sweat out last night’s booze, Brickell offers a little something for everyone. For the caffeine fiend True BaristasThis vintage coffee truck is a total MOOD. Impress your coffee date by recommending this little gem and watch their eyes light up at th

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

One of only a handful of James Beard Award-winning chefs in Miami, Michelle Bernstein carries some serious gravitas in the local culinary scene. So when news of a potential new restaurant hits our radar, we pay attention—even if she isn’t the one doing the cooking. Opening today at the Bayside Marketplace, Caribbean restaurant La Cañita comes to us from Bernstein, her business partner and husband, David Martinez, David Borgia and Orestes Pajon. The four partnered on the Latin-American/Caribbean concept that brings together cuisines from Cuba, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago and Puerto Rico, among other sun-soaked islands. While the team enlisted someone else to go behind the line, Bernstein is very much in charge of what you’ll see on the menu. She’s peppered in her signature empanadas, an assortment of sandwiches and substantial Cuban plates, like the chicken fricassee and arroz con pollo. Other standouts include conch fritters, jerk-kissed chicken wings, snapper filet and a 305 rum cake. Photograph: Michael Pisarri “La Cañita is quintessential Miami,” says Martinez, who also owns co-owns Sweet Liberty and Café La Trova, where Bernstein devised the menus. “We are so fortunate to have this melting pot of cultural and culinary influences in this city, and we hope to put them front-and-center with our new concept-driven restaurant.” The restaurant’s indoor/outdoor design plays heavily into its tropical image, including its pastel hues, cement finishing and waterfront views. Acco

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

We thought the wave of bar and restaurant closures had troughed, but nope. We’re still riding it. Yesterday, the Miami Herald reported that Boxelder Craft Beer Market will be closing for good on October 31. The news comes as a surprise to many who witnessed the evolution of the pioneering enterprise. Husband and wife partners Nicole and Adam Darnell opened Boxelder in 2014 in a still-developing area of Wynwood, where craft beer was only just starting to take off. They were the neighborhood’s first bottle shop and beer bar, featuring a constantly changing selection of craft brews on tap and nearly 150 different bottles to choose from. From the onset, it was a friendly place where all types of drinkers could come together. “We really want to be the place where people feel like they can sit, relax and enjoy themselves. A place where both locals and visitors, beer nerds and novices feel welcome,” Nicole told us back in 2015. Boxelder was also where strangers gathered to shotgun a beer every Friday afternoon. For years just before 4pm, anywhere from 10 to 20 people would convene in the back area of the bar awaiting their free beer to chug before sneakily scurrying back to work. Sometimes, the bar would partner with local bakers and hand out doughnuts and snacks to the folks who’d come for the weekly ritual. Upon its one-year anniversary, Boxelder began its natural evolution as a food incubator, giving a handful of today’s most well-known chefs a platform to launch their businesses

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  • Restaurants
  • Argentinian
  • Miami
  • price 3 of 4

Tucked away on Miami’s Little River, steps from the MiMo Historic District, this scenic waterfront restaurant and bar overlooks an active manatee sanctuary and fits right in among its Art Deco-era neighbors. Drawing inspiration from traditional Buenos Aires bistros or bodegones, Tigre’s co-founders Deborah de Corral (Chef), Eduardo Suarez (Developer/Designer) and Marcos Chantres (Food & Beverage Director) combine re-invented Argentinian classics with an attention to detail that few in this city manage to get right. Expect a seasonal selection of vegetable-forward shared plates such as the excellent red prawn and nectarine tiradito (delicately poached red prawns sandwiched between juicy compressed nectarines in a bright aji amarillo-lime sauce) or the perfectly balanced Luna Roja (Chef’s take on a tuna tartare, served over a beet-strawberry-tomato gazpacho and topped with roasted macadamia nuts and aioli). Mains are a bit more straightforward—among them a beautiful swordfish steak and a well-seasoned churrasco—and are best paired with a side (we enjoyed the garlicky charred broccolini). Flanked by layers of tropical foliage, the pastel-hued indoor-outdoor spaces exude understated, Old World glamor while the slow-moving river encourages a relaxed pace. Deserving of its own mention, the curvilinear wood and rattan interior bar bends over the dining room to create an inviting nook for enjoying Tigre’s menu of typical aperitifs and inventive specialty cocktails.

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

You know him as the chef and owner of Brickell's B Bistro + Bakery—home to some of Miami's most decadent, over-the-top croissants—as well as from his previous posts at notable restaurants, such as Eating House and Bebito's Cafe. Now, chef Henry Hané is taking his talents to Wynwood, where he's set to debut Jattö this fall. Opening in the former Alter location, the modern Peruvian restaurant promises a multi-sensory dining experience, which might be familiar to those who've ventured into molecular-gastronomy territory. Chef Henry, together with chef de cuisine Aleric Constantin, will put forth a collection of small plates where foams, gels, creams and flavorful emulsions are front and center. Some of the highlights from the forthcoming dinner menu include a stone crab causa, featuring claws from George, a local purveyor; huancaina chicken over quinoa; and a leek confit made with cashew cream romesco. For dessert, there’s a cafecito-inspired affogato colada with Frice sorbet, condensed milk foam and colada syrup. Good luck falling asleep after that. Photograph: Courtesy Jattö While the haute-cuisine menu might seem reminiscent of Alter’s style, that’s about where the similarities end. The former industrial space itself is hardly recognizable. Made over in rich green hues, the vibrant dining room is decked with large mirrors and hanging lights to complement the colorful dishes you’ll see making the rounds. Jattö is located at 223 NW 23rd Street and is slated to open for dinner

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

When one door closes, another one literally opens. That’s the case for Argentine chef Mariano Araya, who shuttered his long-running Doral restaurant due to the pandemic and this week gears up to open its successor, Casa Mariano. With two decades of experience and posts at restaurants such as steakhouse Olivios and Marfil Bistro, Araya has plenty to draw from for this new menu, which he’s billing as a collection of his greatest hits and favorites across Argentine and Mediterranean cuisines. The menu will run the gamut from cold and hot appetizers to salads and several kinds of pasta. Seafood and meat categories will be well represented across the menu—think lobster thermidor, black ink seafood risotto, grilled veal chop and a 14-ounce prime ribeye. All steaks will include the option of a house-made sauce, including chimichurri, peppercorn, truffle, bearnaise or bordelaise. “This concept is a labor of love,” says chef Mariano. “From the moment guests step inside, I want them to feel like they are walking into my own home. Every detail, from the décor to the menu and the wine selection, was carefully considered and refined. I’m thrilled to finally welcome everyone to my casa!” To that end, Casa Mariano was designed to resemble someone’s inviting—and very well-appointed—home. A covered patio greets guests as they walk inside the dining room, which features three separate sitting areas: a living room, a private dining space and a wine library with a built-in cellar. That’s where y

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Any Milpa enthusiasts in the house? Anyone? If you have absolutely no idea what we’re referring to, you’ll want to pay close attention to the newest restaurant to debut in Coconut Grove. Heirloom corn and the Mexican ancestral farming techniques used to harvest it are the cornerstones of Los Felix, which opens in the neighborhood on Friday, September 17. The modern Mexican restaurant draws from traditional cooking methods for its classic menu, where you can expect to find tacos and quesadillas made with tortillas cranked out by hand on a mill. “Our mission is to craft authentic Mexican dishes bursting with flavor that honor the sacred connection between man and corn using only ingredients we would feed to our families; seasonal, locally sourced and pastured food,” says chef Sebastián Vargas, who’s worked in high-end kitchens around the world, including Osteria Francescana and Eleven Madison Park. Vargas and his partners in Grassfed Hospitality—restaurateurs Josh Hackler and Pili Restrepo—also own the adjacent artisanal food and wine market, Krüs Kitchen. Photograph: Courtesy Los Felix/William Hereford The restaurant’s name pays homage to iconic Mexican actress María Félix, an embodiment of the legions of grandmothers and mothers who passed along the traditions and culture that Los Félix endeavors to share with its food and drink. As for the latter, it'll serve natural wines sourced from small producers in South America, Mexico, Europe and California. The selection of orange

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