The 20 best restaurants in Miami you have to try

The best restaurants in Miami for luxe South Beach dining, fantastic cheap eats and trendy cafes and diner fare

Choosing a restaurant in Miami can be as challenging as choosing the right spot to park yourself on the beach (and hey, choosing which of our great Miami beaches hit up isn’t too easy, either). But that wasn’t always so. As recently as even a decade ago, the best restaurants in Miami were usually found in swanky South Beach hotel lobbies. Today, the best Miami hotels still offer amazing dining experiences, but good eating has spread throughout the miracle city—from hip Wynwood to Brickell to Little Havana and beyond. For the new breed of best restaurants in Miami, you've come to the right place.

1
Open i studios
Photograph: Open i studios
Restaurants, Fusion
Three
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What is it? Floridian cuisine pioneer Norman Van Aken’s return to Miami marks the chef’s first Wynwood restaurant. The bright, glamorous dining room is striking—but wait till you see the food. 
Why go? Prix-fixe menus of three, four or seven courses instantly elevate the experience. Pairings are done for you as well-portioned dishes make their way to the table in harmony, freeing you up to pore over the exceptional cocktail list. 
icon-location-pin Wynwood
2
Stubborn Seed
Photograph: Courtesy Stubborn Seed/Grove Bay Hospitality
Restaurants, American creative
Stubborn Seed
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What is it? Top Chef winner Jeremy Ford’s intimate, 74-seat restaurant exemplifies Miami’s new wave of fine dining—sophisticated, edgy and with a hint of playfulness. Ford doesn’t take himself or his food too seriously.
Why go? Whether it’s your first or 10th time, the chef’s tasting menu is always a good idea. Combining restaurant staples with seasonal updates, every course builds on the last and offers loads of tasty surprises.
icon-location-pin South of Fifth
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3
Ariete
Photograph: Courtesy Ariete
Restaurants, Contemporary American
Ariete
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What is it? Part American, part Cuban and entirely Miami—this Coconut Grove restaurant churns out solid dishes made from scratch. Subway tiles, dim lighting and a notably calm open kitchen keep the vibe casual and relaxed. 
Why go? Chef/owner Michael Beltran keeps things weird, in the best way possible. He puts head cheese in his croquetas, mushrooms in his flan and foie gras in his pastelitos. Just go with it—the Cuban bred chef knows exactly what he’s doing. 
icon-location-pin West Coconut Grove
4
KYU
Photograph: Juan Fernando Ayora
Restaurants, Barbecue
KYU
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What is it? In just two short years, the modern Asian eatery has nabbed a James Beard Award nomination, a Time Out Bar Awards win and asserted itself as one of the best restaurants in town—and the toughest reservation in Wynwood. Its airy, industrial dining room fits right in with the gritty ’hood.
Why go? Chef Michael Lewis elevates Asian comfort food, wielding classics like pork buns, Korean fried chicken and crab fried rice into satisfying, visually arresting dishes. For every tree used in the wood-fired grill, like the mouthwatering wagyu beef brisket, the restaurant plants five more.
icon-location-pin Wynwood
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5
La Mar
Photograph: Courtesy La Mar
Restaurants, Peruvian
La Mar
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What is it? A sexy waterfront terrace and an irresistible Peruvian menu sum up the celebrated Brickell Key restaurant. 
Why go? Gifted chef Diego Oka has raised the profile of traditional Latin American cuisine with unexpected ingredients and combinations, like the rare cheese-soaked tiradito bachiche—snapper delicately dressed in aged parmesan. It works. Brunch here is an experience and so worth carving out an entire afternoon to enjoy. 
icon-location-pin Brickell Key
6
Macchialina, Restaurants and cafes, Miami
Photograph: Courtesy Macchialina
Restaurants, Italian
Macchialina
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What is it? Rustic and homey, this off-the-beaten-path Italian is full of locals looking to escape the madness of South Beach. Luckily, they’ve found a place to do it where the laid-back vibe is totally authentic and the food is damn good, too
Why go? The fresh, house-made pasta, like the pillowy cavatelli Macchialina in red sauce, is consistently ranked among the best in the city. Stop in Thursdays and try it and all the other pastas for $10. 
icon-location-pin South Beach
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7
Ghee Indian Kitchen
Photograph: Courtesy Ghee Indian Kitchen
Restaurants, Indian
Ghee Indian Kitchen
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What is it? James Beard nominee Niven Patel boosted Indian cuisine in the city with the opening of his Dadeland restaurant. The chef grows a large percentage of the produce and herbs he serves at Ghee at his Homestead farm.
Why go? Unlike the batched, reheated curries you’re used to eating in Miami, Ghee’s made-to-order meals are an explosion of fresh flavors. The cheddar naan, green millet—which Patel ships from a small village in India—and smoked lamb neck are consistent crowd pleasers.
icon-location-pin Design District
8
Mignonette
Photograph: Courtesy Mignonette/Jonathan Scott
Restaurants, Seafood
Mignonette
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What is it? A casual, diner-themed seafood haunt serving Miami’s best selection of oysters, Connecticut-style lobster rolls (buttered claws, no mayo) and delicious bread pudding.
Why go? The old-school marquee that hangs above the kitchen lists the day’s oysters. There are usually about eight East and West varieties to choose from, though you’ll want to ask your server to pick a dozen of their favorites. The staff here knows their stuff.
icon-location-pin Midtown
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9
27 Restaurant & Bar at Freehand Miami
Photograph: Courtesy 27 Restaurant & Bar at Freehand Miami/Justin Namon
Restaurants, Contemporary American
27 Restaurant & Bar at Freehand Miami
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What is it? A homey, bi-level restaurant housed inside a former Art Deco home that serves globally inspired dishes made with fresh ingredients from local farms.
Why go? Hipster home-cooking is the thing here—familiar recipes featuring unexpected ingredients and portioned to share. The kimchi fried rice is a must at brunch or dinner while the arepa platter dominates the appetizer game. And you can’t leave without ordering a cocktail by the famous Bar Lab team.
icon-location-pin Miami Beach
10
Alter
Photograph: Courtesy Alter
Restaurants, American
Alter
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What is it? Chef Brad Kilgore helms the modern, minimalist restaurant in Wynwood. Nominated for James Beards three times over, Kilgore took his previous fine-dining experiences and channeled it into the delicious, refined American cuisine he and partners Javier Ramirez and Leo Monterrey put forth at Alter.
Why go? The progressive menu is a treat from start to finish. There’s a $65 tasting menu for those needing a little guidance but a la carte works too—just make sure to order Kilgore’s soft egg with sea scallop espuma, chive, truffle pearls and Gruyere. You’re bound to get asked about it.
icon-location-pin Wynwood
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11
Michael's Genuine Food & Drink
Photograph: Courtesy The Genuine Hospitality Group
Restaurants, Contemporary American
Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink
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What is it? James Beard Award-winning chef Michael Schwartz’s buzzy restaurant is a true star. Decor and menu are classy yet casual, and the service also strikes just the right note.
Why go? This is the restaurant that put the prolific chef and his high-end comfort food on the map. With an emphasis on local ingredients, specials change daily and might include duck confit with brussels sprouts or steak au poivre. Pick any and prepare to be impressed.
icon-location-pin Design District
12
Pubbelly, Restaurants and cafes, Miami
Photograph: Pubbelly
Restaurants, Contemporary American
Pubbelly Noodle Bar
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What is it? The city’s first Asian-inspired gastropub busted open the doors on traditional Latin fare and introduced Asian flavors to classics such as mofongo.
Why go? Pubbelly continues to innovate with seasonal ingredients, a fresh ramen menu and extraordinary desserts by the group’s pastry chef Maria Orantes. Save room for the coco loco—a refreshing ice cream dessert served inside a hollowed coconut. It doesn’t get more Miami than that.  
icon-location-pin South Beach
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13
Eating House
Photograph: Courtesy CC/Flickr/Brenda Benoît
Restaurants, Contemporary American
Eating House
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What is it? Chef Giorgio Rapicavoli’s small, rustic eatery at the edge of ritzy Coral Gables. Dishes here veer from the ordinary, like the meaty cauliflower steak or seemingly straightforward mushrooms, which give forth an explosion of earthy flavors. 
Why go? You never know what sort of madcap creation Rapivacoli, who’s known for his playful interpretations of the classics, put on the menu next. Though once you try his foie chicken and waffles and Cap’n Crunch pancakes, you’ll never go back to the regular stuff.
icon-location-pin Little Gables
14
Pinch Kitchen
Photograph: Courtesy Pinch Kitchen/Dreamer of Nights Production
Restaurants, American creative
Pinch Kitchen
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What is it? The phrase “neighborhood gem”
gets thrown around but Pinch is truly deserving of the epithet. Nestled in Shorecrest and housed in a former pizza joint, this homey, chef-owned-and-operated restaurant borrows from all sorts of cultures to create its compact but solid menu.
Why go? People drive from all over to try Pinch’s juicy burger, though it’s only served at lunchtime and during brunch service. At dinnertime, turn your attention to Pinch’s vegetable-forward dishes made with ingredients sourced exclusively from local farmers. 
icon-location-pin Miami
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15
LoKal
Photograph: Courtesy Yelp/Mari V.
Restaurants, Contemporary American
LoKal
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What is it? Matthew Kuscher’s neighborhood burger joint is popular with people and canines alike (yep, they’ve got a special dog menu, too).
Why go? The Coconut Grove restaurant’s selection of grass-fed beef burgers runs the gamut from traditional to only-in-Miami, like the famous Cuban frita burger and Juan’s Fidy-Fidy—a decadent patty made from 50 percent Florida beef and 50 percent Florida bacon. Brew-loving Kuscher has also made sure to stock an assortment of local beers. 
icon-location-pin Coconut Grove
16
Cantina La Veinte
Photograph: Courtesy Cantina La Veinte/Rodrigo Moreno
Restaurants, Mexican
Cantina La Veinte
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What is it? This upscale Mexican restaurant doles out fresh, house-made tortillas and authentic eats in swanky environs.
Why go? Proving there’s more to the country’s cuisine than tacos, Cantina serves an extensive assortment of regional dishes and the best margaritas in Miami—even though each sets you back $16. Stop in on Friday and Saturday nights to be serenaded by live mariachis.  
icon-location-pin Brickell
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17
NIU Kitchen
Photograph: Stephan Goettlicher
Restaurants, Spanish
NIU Kitchen
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What is it? The cozy, urban bistro serves the closest thing to authentic Catalan cuisine in Miami—even the names of dishes are written in the ancient Spanish language. 
Why go? Small and hidden, touting a menu of mostly shareable plates, NIU is ideal for couples. Go halfsies on delicious pa amb tomàquet (the traditional rustic bread with vine-ripened tomatoes, olive oil and salt) a bottle of rioja and something starring a running yolk like the ous, a creamy bowl of poached eggs, truffled potato foam, jamón ibérico and black truffle.
icon-location-pin Downtown
18
LUCALI basil pizza
Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz
Restaurants, Pizza
Lucali
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What is it? This Sunset Harbour outpost of the popular Brooklyn pizza joint is just as trendy and crowded as the NYC original.
Why go? New York knows good pizza and Lucali delivers on its home state’s best export, serving large pies (no slices here) topped with all sorts of fresh ingredients (basil is free to add). Diet or not, the kale caesar salad makes for an excellent starter.
icon-location-pin South Beach
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19
Joe's Stone Crab, Restaurants and cafes, Miami
Photograph: Alys Tomlinson
Restaurants, American
Joe’s Stone Crab
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What is it? Opened in 1913, South Florida’s most famous seafood restaurant opens October through May for stone crabs season.
Why go? You’ve waited all year for Joe’s namesake crustacean, but so has the rest of the city. Queue up and prepare to wait with the swarms of locals and tourists who swarm the joint for the freshest claws in town. 
icon-location-pin South of Fifth
20
Versailles
Photograph: Courtesy CC/Flickr/Wally Gobetz
Restaurants, Cuban
Versailles
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What is it? Versailles bills itself as Miami’s most famous Cuban restaurant—and they’re not lying. This place is slammed at all hours of the day.
Why go? If you’re visiting, tick off every Cuban thing from your Miami bucket list—coffee, sandwich and pastelito. If you live here, you’re probably well acquainted with the ventanita dispensing thimbles of addictive cafecito. 
icon-location-pin West Little Havana
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