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Photograph: Courtesy CC/Flickr/Justin Brown

Broadway will officially stay dark until at least Labor Day

The shows can't go on until September 7 at the earliest

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On March 12, all Broadway theaters were closed, effective immediately, to help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus. At that time, the shutdown was set to last through April 12, and was later extended through June 7. Today, the Broadway League confirmed what many had feared: All Broadway performances are now officially canceled through September 6.
 
"While all Broadway shows would love to resume performances as soon as possible, we need to ensure the health and well-being of everyone who comes to the theatre—behind the curtain and in front of it—before shows can return," said  Broadway League president Charlotte St. Martin. "The Broadway League’s membership is working in cooperation with the theatrical unions, government officials, and health experts to determine the safest ways to restart our industry."
If you have tickets for Broadway performances during the shutdown, you should receive an email from your point of purchase soon with information about refunds and exchanges. If you haven't received such an email by May 18, reach out to your ticket source directly at that time.  
It is unclear when Broadway shows will resume normal operations. It seems increasingly likely that it will be well after September.
 
Two Broadway productions, Hangmen and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, already announced that they will never open at all, and the June extension meant the end of the line for Beetlejuice, which had been scheduled to shutter on June 6. Other closures of commercial productions seem likely to follow. The nonprofit companies have responded by shifting their schedules: The Roundabout has moved its two spring productions, the musical Caroline, or Change and the new play Birthday Candlesto the fall; Lincoln Center Theater has done the same with the original musical Flying Over Sunset. Manhattan Theatre Club hopes to present its reunion-revival of How I Learned to Drive in its 2020–21 season. 
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