The U.S. Open in New York 2021 guide

The U.S. Open brings all the stars of the tennis world to Queens for the last major tournament of the season.

U.S. Open Roger Federer
Photograph: Shutterstock

The U.S. Open—New York’s exhilarating summer sports event—is one of the most exciting things to do in Queens each year and finally, it's back at full capacity for 2021. 

"We are extremely excited to be able to welcome our incredible fans back to the US Open this year," said Mike Dowse, USTA CEO. "While we were proud that we were able to hold the event in 2020, we missed having our fans on-site, because we know that they are a large part of what makes the US Open experience unlike any other. Indeed, the challenges presented by the pandemic were tough on us all, but our sport came together like never before and tackled each challenge head on. Interest in tennis has accelerated, with four million new and returning players taking to the court last year. Our sport surged in the toughest of times, and this year’s US Open promises to be an unforgettable celebration of the game, those who play it, and those who revel in it."

Here's what you need to know for the 2021 U.S. Open:

When is the U.S. Open?

The U.S. Open takes place at the end of the summer from Monday, August 30 through Sunday, September 12.

Where is the U.S. Open?

The U.S. Open takes place at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens. 

ESPN and ESPN+ will be covering the games so you will be able to watch them that way if you don't make it in person.

Are fans allowed back in the stands at the U.S. Open?

Yes, the 2021 US Open will welcome fans back to the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center at 100% capacity for the two-week tournament.

How do I get tickets to the U.S. Open?

Tickets to the U.S. Open for the 25 tournament sessions, from reserved stadium seating to general admission grounds passes, are available on USOpen.org and Ticketmaster.

What is there to eat nearby the U.S. Open?

Luckily, Flushing has some of NYC's best restaurants, so you won't have to go far. Check out our list of the five best restaurants in Flushing.

U.S. Open in New York

Everything you need to know about this year's U.S. Open
News

Everything you need to know about this year's U.S. Open

The New York sporting event signifying summer's end is upon us: The U.S. Open. The annual tennis tournament gathers tennis stars from across the world to compete in a two-week championship, wrapping up on Sunday, September 12. The matches have already started, but it's not too late to attend the day-long events at Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing.   RELATED: The U.S. Open in New York 2021 Guide Take public transit  The 7 train pulls up directly to Mets-Willets Point, which is right across from the tennis center. If you prefer a rideshare, expect to wait a long time to get home (and even to enter the drop-off center once you've arrived) and pay much higher than average prices. You're in an outer borough too, so unfortunately yellow and green taxis are few and far between.  There are several types of tickets The U.S. Open takes over a full campus, with two big stadiums: Arthur Ashe Stadium and Louis Armstrong Stadium. Tickets with assigned seats are sold for the day or night games, which assign you a seat and allow access to the grandstands, plus field courts where you can watch big and up-and-coming tennis stars play. The most budget-friendly option is usually to purchase grounds admission, which gets you through the gates, access to all the ground-level courts, and first-come, first-serve entry to Louis Armstrong, though you won't have a specific assigned seat.  You'll know who's playing the night before The way the tennis brackets work, you won't know who you'll see play which match until the previous days' matches end. It adds a level of suspense, but if you're trying to see your favorite player in action, consider waiting to buy tickets until day-of.  Proof of vaccination is required Before you pass through security, you'll need to show proof of vaccination to enter the tennis center. Bring your vax card, have a picture ready, or use your Excelsior Pass.  Protect yourself from the sun It's still summer, and Billie Jean King Tennis Center is hot. Like, sun beating down on you until your clothes are soaked in sweat hot. Bring your SPF, visors, sun hats, whatever you need to stay cool for your day of tennis. If you're going to evening matches, prepare to be warm, but without the blazing rays of sunshine.  BYO Water If you're not into buying pricey bottle of Evian everytime you need a drink, consider packing your own water bottle (and freeze it beforehand to keep it cool). Reusable water bottles, 24 oz or smaller in size, in both metal and plastic, are allowed through security.  Laptops aren't allowed inside  While putting up a Zoom background and dialing into meetings during your day of tennis may sound tempting, know that laptops won't make it through security.  Game times are just estimates  While most sporting events start on time and are apt to run over with clock pauses, extra innings, etc., the matches at the U.S. Open can start late, if the previous matches on the court run over.  There's a ton of good food and bev  Going to the U.S. Open for the eats alone wouldn't be a mistake! Several big name chefs and beloved restaurants have pop-ups at the stadium, including Los Tacos No. 1, Fuku, Hill Country BBQ, Korilla and more. An oyster bar with open air seating is also a nice place to relax, or pick a sit down restaurant, like chef Alex Guarnaschelli's Fare, for an upscale meal with A/C. Alcohol is also sold throughout the stadium, and those of age will find it hard to resist Grey Goose's signature Honey Deuce cocktail or the chilled glasses of Kim Crawford rose and sauvignon blanc. 

Tennis fans can book six free pop-up tennis courts at Pier 76 during the U.S. Open
News

Tennis fans can book six free pop-up tennis courts at Pier 76 during the U.S. Open

If you haven't been able to get on one of NYC's tennis courts, this could be your chance to snag one. When the U.S. Open bounces back to NYC starting August 30, and while the country's biggest tennis stars will rule the courts in Queens, six pop-up courts will be available to book for the general public. American Express is bringing the pop-up courts to Pier 76 for the first time and offering free* bookings to card members and tennis fans alike.  RECOMMENDED: The U.S. Open in New York 2021 guide Photograph: courtesy American Express Photograph: Courtesy American Express If serving balls with views of the Hudson River sounds good to you, five of the six courts will be available to pre-book for American Express Card Members at go.amex/courts. The sixth court will be available on a first-come-first-serve basis, so you'll want to show up as early as you can. (The courts and facilities are ADA accessible.) *There's a $5 court booking reservation fee, which will be donated by Universe, the ticketing platform, to the USTA Foundations' Excellence Team program that supports youth tennis in underserved communities across the country. Players can also enjoy food and drinks at the on-site open-air lounge. Amex will also have a big presence at the U.S. Open—the Amex Patio among other activations, which you can read about here. Located near Court 17, the Amex Patio will be an open-air space for American Express Card Members to relax and recharge, enjoy misting fans and take in the shade in between tennis matches. Drinks like the U.S. Open signature beverage, the frozen Honey Deuce, will be on the menu.  If you haven't been to Pier 76 yet, it's because it's NYC's newest park. It was formerly an empty New York City Police Department impound parking facility at West 38th Street and 12th Avenue, and it underwent major reconstruction to become a new recreational space with a walking area, flexible space and benches for people to relax and enjoy the waterfront views.

Archive U.S. Open in New York coverage

Where to watch U.S. Open matches in NYC
Bars

Where to watch U.S. Open matches in NYC

Are you a dedicated sports fan unsure of where to go to watch U.S. Open matches? Now that the Olympics are over, you might be hankering to get courtside, or settle for the next best thing, watching topspins and backhands from the comfort of neighborhood sports bars. NYC has all eyes turned to the U.S. Open, and if you’re not lucky enough to score tickets to see these historic matches in real life, watching on screen over some craft beer as Venus and Serena and all the rest go down to the tennis court and talk it up is the next best thing. Rally your crew and head to these sports pubs, patios and some of the best outdoor bars NYC has to offer to relax with some televised tennis. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the U.S. Open in NYC

Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in NYC guide
Attractions

Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in NYC guide

Flushing Meadows–Corona Park—one of the top New York attractions and among the best things to do in Queens—was once home to the World’s Fair and is now the city's second-biggest park chock-full of plenty of outstanding things to do. In just one day, you can visit a zoo, go fishing at Meadow Lake, get your park barbecue on along the rolling grass and visit a skate park—not to mention all the art museums and cultural institutions nearby. (Care to see the Mets play, anyone?) Go on, get lost in it! RECOMMENDED: Full guide to NYC parks

The best restaurants in Flushing, Queens
Restaurants

The best restaurants in Flushing, Queens

When we’re seeking some of the best Chinese restaurants in New York, Flushing is always on our list of places to visit. This culinary mecca in Queens’ Chinatown is why we board the 7 train to fix our cravings for dumplings, hand-pulled noodles, bubble tea and Asian desserts. While the nearby Queens Night Market is great, we love Flushing for its endless options around the clock (look for at least an eatery or two to make our best dishes and drinks list this year). RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

How to see the US Open without breaking the bank

How to see the US Open without breaking the bank

It’s no surprise that the US Open has a reputation as one of the most expensive sporting events of the year. Not only is tennis a favorite sport among country club frequenters, but anyone who’s seen the tournament on TV knows it’s the perfect place to spot Bill Clinton, Beyonce, Martha Stewart and multiple Kardashians sitting about, clapping politely. Here’s the good news, though: you don’t need to be able to afford a spot next to Alec Baldwin to watch the athletes in action. There are several ways to enjoy Queen’s biggest annual event without spending much: RECOMMENDED: Full coverage of the U.S. Open in New York 1. Pay nada at the open-to-the-public qualifying rounds: Today marks the beginning of the four day tournament where hundreds of internationally ranked players—typically those that are currently placed between 105 and 250 in the world—compete for a spot in the big event. Many of the contenders are young up-and-comers who might just be destined for their own multi-million dollar product sponsorship deals one day. 2. Watch the powerhouse players practice: If you’re not all that interested in a bunch of potential-stars, don’t write off the qualifying rounds just yet—this is the great time to get a glimpse of the huge stars warming up for the August 31st start date. Check out the practice schedule the morning of and rush for a spot in the crowd to watch the likes of Serena Williams and Andy Murray (both of whom practiced this morning) working on their serves. 3. Skip Flus

Show more