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Alim Kheraj

Alim Kheraj

Articles (27)

The 40 best Netflix original series to binge

The 40 best Netflix original series to binge

Netflix changed the streaming game – and then the game changed on Netflix. When it comes to original programming, the streamer was once pretty much the only player in town, having broken down the door to streaming becoming the dominant form of prestige TV with House of Cards way back in 2013. Obviously, the landscape is much more crowded now. But just when it seems like Netflix has been fully eclipsed by the revolution it kickstarted, something like Squid Game comes along and blows up, placing the streamer right back at the centre of the entertainment conversation. Even during its dry spells of buzz-worthy content, the company has churned out so much classic original programming that most of us won’t get to half of it in our lifetimes. So we’ve put together a list of the 40 Netflix originals series you absolutely must make time for. We’ve left out shows that originated elsewhere before the platform picked them up (sorry, Black Mirror) and we’re also sticking to scripted series (sorry not sorry, Tiger King). Happy bingeing! Recommended: 🎥 The 35 best movies on Netflix right now🔎 The best true crime documentaries on Netflix👽 The best sci-fi shows streaming on Netflix

The best places to see cherry blossom around the world

The best places to see cherry blossom around the world

One of the best things about the weather changing is watching the world bloom again. In Japan, this is a very big deal. Cherry blossom trees there (named ‘sakura’) only bloom for about two weeks in spring – between April and May in the Northern Hemisphere – and people travel from all over the world just to see them. There's even a cherry blossom forecast for sakura season.  Sadly, however, there’s no guarantee they’ll bloom for the actual cherry blossom festival (‘hanami’), so if you’re desperate to see those pretty pink flowers, there is another way. Native to Asia, cherry blossom trees actually bloom all over the world, from Europe to the Southern Hemisphere. So if you’re desperate to admire those pink blossoms (and snap them for your Instagram), you might not have to travel across half the world to do it  – and we’ve rounded up the very best spots for it, right here. From Sweden to Australia, here’s all the best places to see it. Enjoy.  RECOMMENDED: 🌸 The best places to see cherry blossom in the UK 🌺 The best cities to see cherry blossoms in the USA🌿 The 12 best botanical gardens in the world

The 100 best comedy movies: the funniest films of all time

The 100 best comedy movies: the funniest films of all time

It’s easy to make a funny movie. Making a classic comedy is an entirely different matter. It’s one thing to make audiences laugh in the present, but to keep them laughing through the ensuing decades is one of the most difficult tricks in cinema. Because as society changes, so does our sense of humour. What’s hilarious in 1923 might bomb in 2023, and one generation’s laugh riot is another’s laugh riot is another’s ‘huh?’.  That makes ranking the best comedy films of all time particularly difficult. You first have to ask, what makes a comedy truly great? There’s many criteria, but one of the most important is durability. Can it withstand the test of time, and stay funny five, ten, 100 years down the road? Making that determination isn’t easy. So we called in some help. To put together this list, we asked comedians like Diane Morgan and Russell Howard, actors such as John Boyega and Jodie Whittaker and a small army of Time Out writers about the movies that make them chuckle the hardest for the longest period of time. In doing so, we believe we’ve found the 100 finest, most durable and most broadly appreciable laughers in history. No matter your sense of humour – silly or sophisticated, light or dark, surreal or broad – you’ll find it represented here.  Recommended: 🔥 The 100 best movies of all-time🥰 The greatest romantic comedies of all time🤯 33 great disaster movies😬 The best thriller films of all-time🌏 The best foreign films of all-time

The 65 best Christmas songs of all time

The 65 best Christmas songs of all time

Love them, hate them, or just accept them as a sort of immutable fact of life, Christmas songs are a thing, and as December 25 gets inexorably closer and closer they’re a thing that becomes increasingly inescapable. And although there’s been a fair amount of disposable novelty rubbish written over the years, the reality is that a lot of Christmas songs are bangers. There are plenty of keepers from the ‘40s-‘70s heyday of the Christmas record as an art form. But even more cynical later generations of pop have produced plenty of gold. There is, of course, something of a Christmas canon: ‘All I Want for Christmas is You’ and ‘Fairytale of New York’ are great songs… which is good, as inevitably you’re going to hear them about a million times this holidays. But festive cheer has found its way into pop, hip-hop, R&B, metal, punk, indie… you name it. And as a gift for you, we’ve assembled 65 Christmas songs so incredibly catchy, you just might want to listen all year round. Good luck finding the nog in August though. RECOMMENDED: 🎁  The best Christmas markets to visit in Europe and worldwide🎅  The best places to go for Christmas🎄  The six best Christmas towns to visit around the world🎉  The best party songs🎤  The best karaoke songs🕺  The best pop songs of all time🎸  The best classic rock songs😊  The best happy songs

The 100 best horror movies of all time

The 100 best horror movies of all time

Horror movies have rarely got the respect they deserve. Sometimes, it’s for good reason. Particularly in the 1970s and ’80s, the genre became a magnet for hacks and hucksters looking to make a quick buck via the burgeoning VHS video by crapping out a script and dousing horny teens in gallons of stage blood. But that phenomenon had a generational trickle-down effect, staining even the smarter, more artful entries with the taint of schlock.   Only recently has that started to change. Visionary auteurs like Ari Aster and Jordan Peele, and leftfield hits like A Quiet Place, It Follows and Get Out have brought horror to a higher standing in the cinematic universe. But let this list of the greatest horror movies ever made repudiate the idea that the genre has ever been of lesser value than others. After all, every film exists to make an audience feel something – and what makes you feel more than a good horror movie? Among our picks, you’ll find films that mine universal human fears, whether it’s the fear of death and disease or more specific phobias. Some stretch the boundaries of what can be shown on screen, but others can raise the hairs on your arms through mere suggestion.  There is, after all, more than one way to scare someone – and these movies do it better than all others. Written by Tom Huddleston, Cath Clarke, Dave Calhoun, Nigel Floyd, Phil de Semlyen, David Ehrlich, Joshua Rothkopf, Nigel Floyd, Andy Kryza, Alim Kheraj and Matthew Singer Recommended: 🔥 The 100 best mov

The 54 Best Movies On Disney Plus To Watch Right Now

The 54 Best Movies On Disney Plus To Watch Right Now

If you have Disney+ subscription, you’ll have a pretty good idea of what you’re paying for: a lot of Marvel, a bunch of Star Wars, a heap of Pixar and every animated Disney flick you can think of. Even so, it’s still possible to spend half the night endlessly scrolling before giving up and going to bed. And just because you have a better sense of what’s available doesn’t guarantee that anything you throw on will be a winner. So we’ve combed through the streamer’s offerings to compile the can’t-miss options. It includes plenty of classics and buzzy recent releases, sure, but there are also a few hidden gems worth digging for. Recommended: 🐭 The 50 best Disney movies for family night🦸All the Marvel movies ranked from worst to best👾 The 52 best Star Wars characters

Best Notting Hill Carnival soundsystems 2022

Best Notting Hill Carnival soundsystems 2022

It's been three years since we've been allowed to congregate on the streets of Notting Hill, and soak up the loudest tunes that London has to offer. Thankfully, NHC is back this weekend, and while you'll find heaps of live music, vibrant costumes and dancing during the parade, Notting Hill Carnival is also famous for its 36 official static soundsystems that famously (and bassily) soundtrack the two-day party. On every corner of W10 this Bank Holiday weekend, you’ll find different soundsystems blending old-school reggae and dub with bashment, hip hop and more. From chest-rattling dub riddims to samba-sonic Latin music and Caribbean Carnival anthems, you’re bound to find something that gets your feet moving. To give yourself a headstart, we’ve mapped all 36 soundsystems so you can grab a prime spot for raving. What day are the soundsystems playing at Notting Hill Carnival 2022? On Carnival Sunday and Monday, 36 static soundsystems will play from noon to 7pm at various locations across the parade map, which you can find here. Check back nearer the date for the official locations of each soundsystem. Here’s Time Out’s A-Z of Notting Hill Carnival soundsystems this year:

How ABBA’s 2022 virtual concerts could change the face of live music

How ABBA’s 2022 virtual concerts could change the face of live music

It’s time to dust off your flares, pull out those platform boots, grow out your facial hair and get your hair feathered because – SOS! – ABBA are back! Not only have the group reformed to release their first album in 40 years, but for the first time since disbanding in 1982, the Swedish pop band will be performing live again. Well, sort of... Taking a chance to say thank you for the music once more, in May 2022 the pop icons are launching ABBA Voyage, a concert residency taking place at a purpose-built arena near London’s Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Joined by a ten-piece band, the group will perform songs such as ‘Mamma Mia’, ‘The Winner Takes It All’ and ‘Waterloo’, as well as tracks from their platinum-selling new album ‘Voyage’. The quirk is that they won’t actually be there. You see, ABBA Voyage is no normal show. MORE 2022 TRENDS:🚆 Why train travel is going to be on your 2022 bucket list🌳 From parklets to urban forests: how cities will get a whole lot greener in 2022🧙 Why 2022 is going to be the biggest ever year for fantasy on screen In this so-called ‘immersive digital concert experience’, dancing queens Agnetha Fältskog and Anni-Frid Lyngstad, and instrumentalists and songwriters Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus will be performing virtually via custom-built digital avatars, which have, of course, been dubbed their ABBATARS. For more than two years, the band – as well as a bunch of creatives and tech wizards at a visual effects company that was founded by Star Wa

The best gay clubs in London

The best gay clubs in London

London’s LGBTQ+ scene has long been full of vibrant venues offering safe spaces to be yourself. Its heartland is still very much located in its traditional home of Soho, but you’ll find brilliant gay bars and clubs dedicated to serving the community south of the river and in the East End too. There’s plenty of diversity in what they offer, from super cool and edgy club nights to events showcasing the best in the city’s cabaret performers. Caught the Bimini Bon-Boulash bug over lockdown? You'll love getting to know the rest of London's incredible drag stars too.   Are you more in the market for a drink and a sit down? Check out these LGBTQ+ pubs and bars.

The best gay bars in London

The best gay bars in London

London's LGBTQ+ scene is among the brightest and most fabulous in the world. Whether you're looking to learn about queer history by seeking out some LGBTQ+ landmarks, or maybe your queer quest is slightly more hedonistic and the vibrant LGBTQ+ clubs are your thing, there's more than enough to keep you busy. Of course, much of this city’s queer history is housed in our bars and clubs. And London, thank goodness, still has a diverse number of LGBTQ+ venues, even outside of Soho. So, whether you're after a drag brunch, a burlesque show or just a quiet pint, here's a comprehensive list of the capital's gay and queer-friendly bars and pubs, including those predominantly for lesbians. RECOMMENDED: Read our love letter to London’s LGBTQ+ venues

The 25 greatest songs about rain

The 25 greatest songs about rain

From the rain-soaked streets of London to the alleys of Portland, people love to complain about rain. But people the world over also love to sing about the rain. It's not all sadness and metaphors for weeping, either. Sure, you'll find some tears amid the 25 songs about rain below, but you'll also find psychedelic classics, joyful club bangers and wet-hot disco jams. Together, they constitute the ultimate rainy-day playlist. Don't worry about the rain, either. Rihanna brought her umbrella. Listen to these songs on Amazon Music RECOMMENDED:❄️  The best snow songs☀️  The best summer songs🎤  The best karaoke songs😭  The best sad songs😊  The best happy songs

The 11 best Bollywood songs

The 11 best Bollywood songs

While we may have chosen 100 of the best Bollywood movies, with over six decades of popular Hindi cinema, it's nearly impossible to choose just 11 of the best Bollywood songs. So instead, we've picked just a taster of the world of Bollywood music, selecting 11 of the most memorable and important songs. With films dating from 1951 to 2014, this list will give you a glimpse into just how much Bollywood has changed over the last 60 years, while providing you with some absolute bangers you'll want to add to your playlists, too.  RECOMMENDED: The 100 best romantic films

Listings and reviews (21)

Bros

Bros

4 out of 5 stars

There’s a lot riding on Bros. While, misleadingly, it’s been touted as the first gay romantic comedy ever released by a major studio – erasing the straight-to-streaming gems Fire Island and Kristen Stewart’s festive romp The Happiest Season, not to mention teen heart-warmer Love, Simon – it is the first (at least adult romcom) to get a wide theatrical release. It’s also the first major studio film with an all LGBTQ+ principal cast and the first time an openly gay man, Billy Eichner, has starred in and written his own major studio film released in cinemas. With so many firsts, a film might buckle under the avalanche of the accompanying expectations. Thankfully, Bros is so belly-achingly funny, sharply observant and wryly self-aware that it can more than withstand such a crushing weight. The film follows Bobby (Eichner), a 40-something writer, podcast host and the curator of a soon-to-be-open LGBTQ+ museum who has given up on love. Instead, he fills his life with disappointing Grindr hook-ups and a bullish determination leave his mark as a queer personin a world of boorish heteronormativity. His anti-romantic resignation is disrupted at a launch party for Zellwegr, a new dating app for ‘gays who want to talk about actresses’, when he catches the eye of ‘straight acting’ lawyer Aaron (the dashingly handsome Luke Macfarlane). Like Bobby, Aaron has also sworn of relationships, although the pair find themselves in a strange courtship: ‘We went on one date,’ Bobby says, ‘and had sex

Columbia Road Flower Market

Columbia Road Flower Market

One of London’s most well-known and nicest-looking markets, Columbia Road overflows with bucketfuls of beautiful flowers every Sunday. From 8am-3pm, market traders line the narrow street selling flowers, houseplants, herbs, bulbs and shrubs. It’s worth shopping around, don’t be afraid to barter and prepare for it to get very busy. The market is popular with locals and tourists and during the midday rush is rammed with people elbowing their way to that perfect pot plant. If you can’t bear crowds or just want to guarantee the pick of the crop, arrive when the market opens. When you’ve bought your blooms, head behind the stalls and down side streets to find fantastic cafés, independent restaurants, delis, shops, antique dealers, vintage stalls and small galleries, many of which follow the market’s opening hours. Pop into Jones Dairy Cafe for organic and local produce, treat yourself to a no-frills British bake at Treacle or sink a locally brewed pint at the Nelson’s Head. I've heard I need to queue now. Is that true? Where as in ye olden days you'd just show up for Columbia Road Flower Market and cram yourself into a packed corridor of tourists and tiny dogs, trying to get the best deal on a bunch of peonies. Now things have changed. Post-Covid, you have to queue to enter the Flower Market. The entrance is at the Shoreditch end of the famous market street with the queue running through Ravenscroft Park. Wait times are signposted and while sometimes it can look like a very long

Bros: After the Screaming Stops

Bros: After the Screaming Stops

3 out of 5 stars

With this documentary about ’80s boyband Bros, co-directors Joe Pearlman and David Soutar have created one of the most searing, raw and, at times, unintentionally hilarious documentaries about the impact of fame in recent memory. We meet Bros twins Matt and Luke Goss, now pushing 50, as they’re about to embark on a 2017 reunion tour. The shows are the first the brothers have played together in nearly 30 years. ‘After the Screaming Stops’ initially plays like a fairly conventional music doc. Matt and Luke narrate their meteoritic rise to stardom and chart the crash when it was all over. For those unfamiliar with Bros, they were British pop’s biggest boyband from 1988 to 1992, and caused the sort of hysteria where a record signing at an HMV could muster 130,000 fans. These days, however, the Bros brothers are suffering the fallout of their fame. Drummer Luke, now an actor, feels inadequate after years of self-doubt, while Matt, a Vegas crooner, resents his brother for calling it quits in 1992. Their reunion is an attempt to solve their own issues and give their old fans a treat in the process, but old wounds still fester. ‘After the Screaming Stops’ captures these tensions with a candour rare in a pop doc. The squabbling siblings seem to forget that the cameras are there, letting their vulnerabilities hang out and occasionally slipping into a self-parody of ageing pop stars. It cuts back and forth between past memories and modern-day fights, with Matt and Luke punctuating thing

Brixton Village and Market Row

Brixton Village and Market Row

Brixton Village and Market Row, two indoor markets housed in separate arcades, are integral to Brixton’s rich history. Over the last decade they have transformed into an epicentre for London’s culinary diversity, housing nearly 130 independent traders. Foodwise, you’ll find successes such as Franco Manca and Honest Burgers, both of which started in Brixton Village and have since multiplied across London, plus plenty of other cafés and restaurants to explore. Try Jamaican/European fusion seafood at Etta’s Seafood Kitchen, street-style Mexican food at Jalisco, smokey Portuguese grill at Brixton Village Grill, French spot Champagne + Fromage, where you can sip on champagne while trying out cheeses, and of course, a multitude of Caribbean restaurants and takeaways. If you don’t fancy eating out, or just want to pick up something for dinner, there are fruit and veg shops and stalls, fishmongers and butchers like Dombey & Son, which has been in business for more than 30 years. A visit to Brixton Village and Market Row is about more than food, though. A stroll through the arcades will reveal a treasure trove of shops selling clothing, jewellery, homeware, art, music and more. Leftovers is an antique and vintage fashion emporium favoured by costume-lovers and designers, while Cornercopia Homestore is the perfect place to pick up enamel pots, wooden spoons and unique cookware. Top tip: On Saturdays, Brixton Station Road hosts a space that cycles between a flea market, a makers’ mar

Borough Market

Borough Market

Dating back to the thirteenth century, this historic food market (London’s oldest) is a sprawling cornucopia of gourmet goodies. It’s best to visit Borough Market on an empty stomach so you have room to snaffle samples of the bread, cured meats, cheese, olives and pastries on offer. The market used to mainly highlight British produce but nowadays you can find a global smorgasbord of traders. This goes for the street-food vendors too – you can indulge in succulent and salty French confit duck sandwiches, aromatic Ethiopian stir-friend stews, Spanish chorizo sarnies, Tuscan porchetta-inspired spit roast and even the humble scotch egg (elevated, of course). Being London’s best and most famous food market has its pitfalls: it can get extremely cramped and chaotically busy. The market is a tourist hotspot and many of its visitors are there to take pictures rather than buy anything. So if your aim is to shop, arrive early to avoid the crush. If the crowds are too overwhelming, pick up some bits to go from Neal’s Yard Dairy, Cannon & Cannon and Bread Ahead, then head down to bankside for a riverside picnic. It’s worth noting that the market is closed on Sundays and exists only in skeleton form on Mondays and Tuesdays. Top tip: Arrive early and grab a coffee from Monmouth, on the south side of the market, before you shop for the perfect way to kick off your day. Alim Kheraj Recommended: London’s best markets

Brick Lane Market

Brick Lane Market

Now far more than just a string of stalls selling bric-à-brac and fruit and veg, Brick Lane Market, in the heart of Shoreditch, has grown and mutated over the years to incorporate five different markets known as The Truman Markets. Operating at its fullest on Sundays, Brick Lane and its surrounding streets come alive, teeming with sellers shifting their wares. Outside the bagel bars, curry houses and vintage shops, people without proper stalls set up shop on carpets and tables, selling old electrical equipment, toys, records, broken musical instruments, furniture and everything else under the sun. Down one side street you’ll come across Backyard Market, a covered, warehouse-sized space with stalls focused on arts and crafts. Pop in for clothes, cards and wrapping paper, one-of-a-kind jewellery and tote bags, all from up-and-coming designers and creatives. The Sunday Upmarket is a food hall brimming with street food vendors selling a global smorgasbord of cuisine. There are also more than 200 market stalls here selling vintage clothing, fashion by new and established designers, jewellery and homewares. The Vintage Market does what it says on the tin, with stalls selling clothing, accessories and retro memorabilia from the 1920s to the 1990s. If you’re into chintz,, The Tea Rooms host charming stalls selling things like typewriters, taxidermy and vintage maps. If you need to fuel up, there’s the Boiler House Food Hall, which has around 30 stalls selling culinary delights fr

Petticoat Lane Market

Petticoat Lane Market

There’s a reason why Petticoat Lane Market is no longer on Petticoat Lane and that’s because Petticoat Lane no longer exists. Thanks to the prudish sensibilities of the Victorian era that found undergarments uncouth, the street was renamed Middlesex Street in 1846. There are two markets here which operate at different times of the week. From Monday to Saturday, the market is condensed and relegated to Wentworth Street, Bell Lane and Goulston Street, selling homeware, toiletries, batteries, plus other bits and bobs, between 8am-4pm. The market spreads to Middlesex Street and the surrounding area on Sundays, operating between 9am-2pm. Here you’ll find all of the above plus extra street food vendors, more clothing and leather goods. There are also shops selling fabrics hidden behind the stalls. Alim Kheraj RECOMMENDED: London’s best markets

Alfies Antique Market

Alfies Antique Market

Housed in a huge Egyptian-style art-deco building that used to be Jordan’s department store, Alfies Antiques Market, which was founded more than 40 years ago by Bennie Gray of Gray’s Antiques Market in Mayfair, has been one of London’s premier destinations for collectors, dealers, celebs and bargain hunters on a mission to uncover unique and genuine antiques and vintage items. Across 35,000 sq ft and four floors, this Marylebone establishment is home to around 100 dealers selling antique furniture, retro clothing,  jewellery, memorabilia, homeware and decorations. Dodo Posters, run by Liz Farrow since the 1960s, sells vintage advertising and movie posters, while Diplomat Treasures International offers a mix of twentieth-century furniture, African carvings, Chinese vases and modern art. Everything feels carefully curated, and this is reflected in the prices, but if you’re serious about picking up a one-of-a-kind item, this huge antiques arcade is hard to beat. Alfies Antiques Market also has a rooftop kitchen and café – a hidden oasis that basks in sunlight for most of the day. Pop up for brunch, a burger, afternoon tea or a celebratory glass of prosecco after you’ve nabbed that 1930s light fitting you’ve always wanted but could never find. Top tip: Many of the surrounding shops on Church Street also specialise in twentieth-century antiques and collectables, high-end art and decorations. Alim Kheraj RECOMMENDED: London’s best markets

Dover Street Market

Dover Street Market

Moving to Haymarket hasn’t lessened the magnificence of Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo’s groundbreaking mecca for the fashion-obsessed. With a beautiful array of stuffed birds and a trio of reimagined Burberry trenches on the way in, it is brilliant from the off. A champion of our capital’s pioneering fashion designers, it houses collections from some of London’s brightest stars, such as Grace Wales Bonner’s wonderfully elegant menswear and Molly Goddard’s dream dresses woven out of tulle. The style of the market, which is reminiscent of a Harajuku shopping complex, and a vending machine that dispenses Dover Street Market-bralimanded T-shirts, are nods to Kawakubo’s home country. Her label, Comme des Garçons, is well represented here alongside lines such as Valentino, Givenchy and Azzedine Alaïa. The basement houses more affordable streetwear, and the ground floor has a smart selection of edgy jewellery plus all of the Comme des Garçons fragrances. Once you’ve taken it all in, head to the top floor for a sit-down in the Rose Bakery. Top tip: If you’ve fallen in love with the fashion but just can’t justify the price tag, keep your eyes peeled for the sales, which can see items reduced by up to 40 percent. Alim Kheraj RECOMMENDED: London’s best markets

Portobello Road Market

Portobello Road Market

While Notting Hill has become one of London’s most affluent and desirable areas, Portobello Road Market, which runs between Notting Hill Gate and Ladbroke Grove, retains the area’s former cool. There’s the architecture – colourful terraced houses and shops all tightly squeezed together – and the market, which is actually several markets melded together. Portobello Road Market is best known for its antiques, with hundreds of dealers selling jewellery, books and collectables dating from the 1600s to the 1960s. There are numerous reasons for foodies to visit Portobello Road. Like many London markets it began life as a place to buy fruit and veg, something you can still do six days a week (the whole market is closed on Sundays). There are numerous eateries dotted around, like local institution Lowry & Baker, while street-food vendors pitch up on Fridays and Saturdays. Nearby Golborne Road has North African and Caribbean street food available during the week. Under the Westway and along the walkway to Ladbroke Grove, second-hand clothes sit next to the wares of up-and-coming fashion designers. Fridays are a little less hectic here, and you’ll be able to explore fashion-focused Portobello Green Market, which comprises more than 800 stalls. But Portobello Road is a top tourist destination, so it’s always going to be busy. However, it’s full of character and charm, so embrace its craziness and soak up the vibe. Top tip: In the summer, grab an iced latte from Coffee Plant, which se

Deptford Market

Deptford Market

Not to be confused with nearby regenerated commercial hub Deptford Market Yard, Deptford Market is as traditional as they come. Dubbed by social researcher Charles Booth in the 1890s as ‘the Oxford Street of south London’, this market might no longer see the high footfall of the past, but in the face of staunch competition from pricier farmers’ markets and the rise of online retailers, it’s managed to thrive. The market, which operates on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 9am-5.30pm, spans Deptford High Street, Douglas Way and the junction with Griffin Way. Deptford High Street is where you’ll find fresh fish, fruit and veg, multi-cultural foods, fabrics and assorted bits-and-bobs. Meanwhile, Douglas Way is a treasure trove of bric-à-brac, both new and old. It’s worth popping down before midday, as many traders pack up after lunch. Alim Kheraj RECOMMENDED: London’s best markets

Northcote Road Market

Northcote Road Market

Located in the heart of ‘Nappy Valley’ — the area between Clapham and Wandsworth — Northcote Road Market is no longer a humble fruit and veg market for locals. Nowadays it sells a mixture of cured meats, olives, cakes, jewellery, clothing and arts and crafts as well as more everyday items. On Fridays and Saturdays, its busiest days when all the stalls are open, you’ll also come across vendors offering street food like pizzas and hog roasts. Antiques can be found at the indoor Northcote Road Antiques Market, which is south down the street, while there are also numerous nearby restaurants, cafés and boutique shops to poke around. Alim Kheraj RECOMMENDED: London’s best markets

News (36)

Top Cuvée’s boozy Easter egg hunt is back and better than ever

Top Cuvée’s boozy Easter egg hunt is back and better than ever

The Easter Bunny doesn’t only deal in chocolate. We have it under good authority that the rarely spotted rabbit has, once again, teamed up with Highbury wine bar and shop Top Cuvée for an Easter egg hunt that promises to reward participants with, among other things, free wine.  Top Cuvée hosted an Easter egg hunt last year in Clissold Park. Taking place on Easter Sunday, the free event saw eager entrants roaming the park in search of ‘eggs’, which were in fact QR codes offering rewards. Spoils included free wine, chocolate (natch), vouchers, stickers, tote bags and discounts, with a main prize of a three-month wine subscription. That’s one generous bunny.  Because we Londoners can’t ever get enough of free stuff, the event was a hopping great success. And now Top Cuvée has announced that its Easter egg hunt is set to take place once again on Easter Sunday (April 17). Described as ‘bigger, better, funner than ever’, this year’s hunt will undoubtedly see Top Cuvée dole out some egg-cellent prizes, especially as it’s teaming up with some friends for this year’s event. Others involved in the hunt include Tony’s Chocolonely, Time Out’s inaugural Clash of the Slices winner Yard Sale Pizza, Jolene bakery, Supa Ya Ramen, Mam Sham, Patty & Bun, Brindisa and many others.  View this post on Instagram A post shared by Top Cuvée (@topcuvee) So that things don’t get out of hand, this year potential egg hunters will have to register in order to take pa

A garden symbolising racial and climate injustice is coming to the Chelsea Flower Show

A garden symbolising racial and climate injustice is coming to the Chelsea Flower Show

Each year, the RHS Chelsea Flower Show sees garden lovers flock to SW3 to get their annual fix of horticultural goodness. There’s always much chatter about the most spectacular floral displays, but one of the gardens at this year’s show has been designed to spark debate of a different kind: about racial and climate injustice.  Titled Hands Off Mangrove by Grow2Know, the garden is inspired by the story of the Mangrove Nine, a group of activists who were arrested and persecuted by the police in 1970 following raids on the historic Mangrove restaurant in Notting Hill. The subsequent trial saw all nine defendants acquitted, with the judge describing ‘evidence of racial hatred’ in the Metropolitan Police. Steve McQueen made a film about it, ‘Mangrove’, which was part of his ‘Small Axe’ anthology series that screened on the BBC in 2020.  Another inspiration for the garden is the deforestation of mangroves around the world. In its centre will be a four-metre-tall sculpture with nine bare roots, each recognising a Mangrove Nine defendant, surrounded by various lush species, including edible plants like beetroot, peppers, rocket and tomatoes. The crushed concrete path that runs through the garden represents the challenges and threats of racism, poverty and violence in 1970s Notting Hill and today.  The garden has been created by Grow2Know, a non-profit organisation started after the Grenfell Tower fire that aims to demonstrate the healing and unifying power of gardening. Speaking abo

IKEA in Tottenham is closing down and flat-pack furniture fans are not happy

IKEA in Tottenham is closing down and flat-pack furniture fans are not happy

It’s a sad day for couples who like to argue at the weekend while perusing homeware: IKEA has announced that it’s calling time on its Tottenham branch.  According to a report in the Guardian, the Swedish retailer said that it was closing the north London superstore in order to keep up with ‘changing shopping behaviours’, given that more than half of its sales are now made online. It has pledged to redeploy as many of the store’s 450 employees as possible. This comes as IKEA is staking a claim on the high street. The furniture giant recently opened a smaller iteration of its usually giant shopping warehouses on Hammersmith’s King Street with a focus on home accessories and soft furnishings. And last year, London’s meatball lovers rejoiced when IKEA announced it would be taking over the giant Topshop on Oxford Street after bidding a whopping £400 million to secure the space. This new central location is set to open in the autumn of 2023.  IKEA has not said when it plans to shutter the north London store, but flat-pack furniture fans are already in mourning. And someone’s even started a petition to keep it open. IKEA Tottenham: how we will miss you.  losing the tottenham ikea will leave a gaping hole in my life. i don't think anything or anyone has ever abandoned me quite so violently. — Ava-Santina (@AvaSantina) March 30, 2022 ikea tottenham is shutting down my life is over what’s the point anymore — soph, msc🪷 (@sophsdayoff) March 30, 2022 IKEA Tottenham closing is

London’s pubs can stay open later over the Jubilee bank holiday weekend

London’s pubs can stay open later over the Jubilee bank holiday weekend

We have more than one reason to celebrate the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee. Not only does it mark the 70 years that she’s been on throne, but it’s also the reason we’re getting an extra bank holiday in June. And now we’ve learned that, so we can maximise our jubilation, pubs in London will be allowed to stay open later over the long weekend.  The government has announced that pubs all over England and Wales can extend their closing time to 1am on June 2, 3 and 4 in honour of Her Majesty. In a statement detailing the change in licensing hours, Home Office minister Kit Malthouse, said: ‘The Order being laid before the House today, will apply to premises already licensed until 11pm for the sale of alcohol for consumption on the premises, for the provision of late-night refreshment (only where there is also the sale of alcohol for consumption on the premises), and for the provision of regulated entertainment in England and Wales.’ For those who don’t speak politician, what that means is that, if your local’s usual last orders are 11pm, it will be able to stay open and keep serving until 1am, giving you ample time to get the pints in for Lizzie.  As well as pubs opening late, there are loads of events taking place to mark the Platinum Jubilee, including the unveiling of a colossal metal dragon. Fortnum & Mason has launched a competition to find a new pudding to commemorate the occasion, which will be judged by Mary Berry, chef Monica Galetti and the Queen’s head chef Mark Flanagan. An

Why have some of London’s iconic red letterboxes suddenly turned pink?

Why have some of London’s iconic red letterboxes suddenly turned pink?

Something strange is afoot in London. Aside from the usual nonsense and foolery that is every day life in the city, people have started noticing a bizarre phenomenon: some of the capital’s iconic red Royal Mail letterboxes have turned pink. And this seems to be happening all over the UK. View this post on Instagram A post shared by C H L O E T A Y L O R (@chloe_taylor_c) Speculation about what has led to this change in colour has been rife. When pink letterboxes appeared in Kilmarnock, Scotland in 2021, the Daily Record reported that Facebook users were wondering whether vandals might have been having some fun with a brush and some pots of paint. There were also suggestions that the new pink colouring meant that the postboxes were designated for Covid-19 tests. However, such theories turned out to be incorrect. Nor was Royal Mail planning a pink rebrand (although it definitely should consider that).  The explanation for the pink letterboxes is fairly straightforward and doesn’t involve any conspiracies or skulduggery. In a statement given to Birmingham Live, Royal Mail said the repainting of the letterboxes is part of an ‘an ongoing programme of postbox maintenance which involves application of a pink primer before the box is repainted in its iconic red’.  View this post on Instagram A post shared by Emilyn Swag (@emilynswag) This isn’t the first time that letterboxes in the UK have changed colour

Carnaby Street has been transformed into a giant table football game

Carnaby Street has been transformed into a giant table football game

Carnaby Street is no stranger to an installation or two, and its latest makeover is a sign that football is, indeed, coming home. To celebrate 100 days until Uefa Women’s Euro England 2022, the iconic shopping promenade has transformed into a giant table football game.  The player models are nine feet tall, suspended five metres above the ground all along Carnaby Street and, unlike on a traditional table, all women. There’s also a regular-sized table football game on the ground that anyone who finds themselves walking down Carnaby Street can play for free.  The installation was unveiled yesterday (March 28), to coincide with tickets to games in the tournament going on sale, by a bunch of football legends including Rio Ferdinand, Millie Bright, Jess Carter, Fara Williams, Kenza Dali, Elz the Witch and Ann-Katrin Berger.  A team of giant female football players bobbing above shoppers’ heads definitely signposts just what a major deal the Women’s Euros are going to be. With 16 nations taking part in the tournament, 31 games will be played at ten venues around England, including in Brighton, Manchester, Milton Keynes and, naturally, London. Ticket-wise, the European Championship, which was due to take place last year but was postponed due to the pandemic, is looking to be a record-breaking event, surpassing 2017’s tournament in the Netherlands. In fact, demand is so high that more than half of the 700,000 tickets available have already been snapped up in various pre-sales, public

5 wild reasons you need to stream ‘Joe vs. Carole’ right now

5 wild reasons you need to stream ‘Joe vs. Carole’ right now

Hey cool cats and kittens, the Tiger King is back. Well, sort of: the dramatisation of everyone’s favourite lockdown true-crime story and big cat feud, Joe vs. Carole, has arrived. And like the story it’s based on, it’s wilder than a pride of lions. Starring Saturday Night Live staple Kate McKinnon as Carole Baskin and Hedwig and the Angry Inch’s John Cameron Mitchell as Joe Exotic, the show is based on the hit podcast of the same name. Released in the early pandemic days of 2020, the Netflix documentary series, Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem, and Madness, told a tale so outlandish that it could only true. Focused on the bitter feud between the eccentric Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue in Tampa, Florida, and Joe Exotic, the larger-than-life owner of G.W. Zoo in Oklahoma, it plunged into the murky world of big cat conservationists and collectors, private zoos and animal sanctuaries, and the mad lengths people go to protect, and profit from, exotic animals. Naturally, it was announced that this true crime story would be getting a mini-series adaptation. And that show, Joe vs. Carole – streaming now on Peacock in the US and Now TV in the UK – is every bit as dramatic, bizarre and out-there as its source material. Here are five wild reasons you should give it a go. 1. The casting is purrfectGiven their ‘unique’ personalities, it would have been easy for Baskin and Exotic to verge on parody here. Thankfully, McKinnon and Cameron Mitchell have found the humanity as well as the hu

2022年世界のトレンド:ABBAが変えるライブ音楽の形

2022年世界のトレンド:ABBAが変えるライブ音楽の形

さあ、ベルボトムのほこりを払い、厚底ブーツを引っ張り出し、ひげを伸ばして、髪形をフェザーカットにする時だ。なぜかって? それはあのスウェーデンのポップグループ、ABBAが復活したからだ(ここで「SOS!」と口ずさもう)。それも、単に40年ぶりのアルバムをリリースするためだけではない。1982年の解散以来初めてとなるコンサートも開催される。ただし「ある種」の、だ。 ABBAの音楽へもう一度感謝を伝えられるチャンスが訪れるのは、2022年5月。彼らは、ロンドンのクイーン・エリザベス・オリンピック・パーク近くの専用アリーナで、レジデンス型コンサート『ABBA Voyage』をスタートさせる。10人の生バンドをバックに、『マンマ・ミーア』『ザ・ウィナー』『恋のウォータールー』といった往年のヒット曲をはじめ、プラチナムセールスを獲得しているニューアルバム『Voyage』からの楽曲も披露する予定だ。 アバターでの「没入型デジタルコンサート」 このコンサートついて、一つだけ奇妙なことがある。それは、ABBAのメンバーが「実際には」ステージにいないということ。そう、『ABBA Voyage』は普通のコンサートではないのだ。 『ABBA Voyage』は、いわゆる「没入型デジタルコンサート」。「ダンシングクイーン」であるアグネッタ・フェルツクグとアンニ・フリッド・リングスタッド、楽器演奏を担当し、曲も書くベニー・アンダーソンとビョルン・ウルヴァースらは、デジタルアバターとなり、バーチャルパフォーマンスを行う。この企画のために特別にデザインされたアバターの呼び名は、すばり「ABBAtars」だ。 ABBAtarsは、グループの全盛期だった1970年代のメンバーの姿を踏襲している。60歳代後半から70歳代になった今の彼らではなく、ユーロビジョンを席巻し、その後の50年間で4億枚のレコードを売り上げることになる音楽的レガシーを築き上げ始める頃の彼らだ。 Photograph: ABBA Voyage アバターは「ホログラム」とは違う 実際のスターが登場しない「バーチャール」エンターテインメントというと、コンピューターで生成されたホログラムを使うものを思い出すかもしれない。ホログラムは、2012年の『コーチェラ・フェスティバル』のステージにおいて、その15年前に殺害されたトゥパック・シャクールをよみがえらせることに使われて以来、ライブ音楽業界を騒がせてきた。2014年のビルボード・アワードでは、ホログラムのマイケル・ジャクソンが登場。もうこの世にいないロイ・オービソンやホイットニー・ヒューストンが「ホログラムツアー」を行ったことも記憶に新しい。 故人をデジタルで復活させることについての反応には、驚きと反発が入り混じりがちだ。2016年に他界する前、プリンスはホログラムについて「想像し得る限り最も悪魔的なもの ......そして私は悪魔ではない」と発言。オービソンとヒューストンのツアーに対する評価もさまざまで、ある評論家は、故人の遺産を活用した「悪趣味な換金行為」と評している。 『ABBA Voyage』には本人たちが参加 『ABBA Voyage』に登場するABBAtarsたちは、こうしたコンピューターで生成されたホログラムとは違う。さらに言うと、「故人」をよみがえらせたホログラムではなく、アーティスト本人の参加があるという点で大きく異なるといえる。 このユニークなライブ音楽体験を実現するため、ABBAのメンバーは、2年以上準備してきた。協業したのは、『スター

‘The defining feature of queer London is resilience’

‘The defining feature of queer London is resilience’

Throughout my life, I’ve constantly interrogated what exactly ‘queer London’ is. Growing up in the ’90s under the vice of Section 28 (a Thatcherite law prohibiting the ‘promotion of homosexuality’), Soho held an unknowable allure whenever I visited its higgledy-piggledy streets. It maintained that magic as I became a teenager: Soho was where, aged 14, I went alone to my first Pride, only to bump into my biology teacher on Greek Street. I remember the nervous excitement that hummed through me as I walked with the crowd, soaking up the fact that there were so many LGBTQ+ people in London. The first gay club I went to, Ghetto, was tucked away between the Astoria and Soho Square. Like many queer kids who came of age in the 2000s, my gay education began and ended with ‘Queer as Folk’. I devoured both the British and American versions, and believed that – like Manchester and the fictional version of Pittsburgh – each city around the world had its own gay village. In my young mind, London’s was Soho. Photograph: Tim Boddy Naturally, that changed. On a night out with my sister, we (rather naively) went to Fire in Vauxhall. It offered a version of what I’d come to know from Soho, but on steroids. Muscular men danced with their tops off, people were clearly on drugs and it was, for me at least, a little too much – although none of that stopped me going back. When I returned to London after studying in Brighton, wizened a little to the realities of the gay scene, Soho had lost its shi

Independent Venue Week 2021 is massively important

Independent Venue Week 2021 is massively important

It’s no secret that independent venues around the UK have struggled this year. Multiple lockdowns have decimated the live-entertainment industry, and according to reports in September more than half of staff at venues across the country have been placed on furlough, with employment in the live entertainment sector falling by 15 percent.  All of this makes initiatives like Independent Venue Week all the more important. Each year, hundreds of grassroots venues across the UK take part in an exciting week of live music that celebrates independent live music venues all around the country, while championing the people that run them and the communities that they foster.  This year, the festival's eighth edition, is kicking off January 25 (that's this Monday). Featuring more than 100 venues, 96 performances, 23 'in conversation with' type thing, some nice panels and even a handful of quizzes, this is well worth your time. Musicians performing include Liam Gallagher, Blossoms, Idles, Bombay Bicycle Club, Sam Smith, DMC and Beverly Knight. Obviously there's loads more besides (including Gruff Rhys playing guitar in what looks like a swamp), so why not just get yourself over to their website and have a look for yourself.  ‘Independent venues are the backbone of live music,’ says the festival's ambassador Arlo Parks. ‘I’m determined to help to support and protect these national treasures.’  Much-loved London venues being used for performances and interviews next week include The Clapham

The BFI Flare LGBTIQ+ film festival has been cancelled due to coronavirus

The BFI Flare LGBTIQ+ film festival has been cancelled due to coronavirus

The BFI Flare: London LGBTIQ+ Film Festival has been cancelled, representatives from the BFI have confirmed today.  As of last week, the status of the festival, which was due to kick off on Wednesday and run until March 29, was business as usual. However, given the situation in the country regarding the Covid-19 pandemic, the decision was made that the festival would not take place.  ‘It’s with heavy hearts that we announce that, due to the scale and complexity of running a large international film festival with filmmakers set to travel from across the world, the BFI has taken the very difficult decision to cancel the 2020 edition of BFI Flare: London LGBTIQ+ Film Festival as the Covid-19 pandemic rapidly evolves,’ said a statement.  ‘BFI Flare is a very special and long-standing festival with a loyal and dedicated following and we realise that this is a very disappointing situation for audiences, our staff and festival teams and all of the incredibly talented and passionate filmmakers involved.’ However, the BFI did note that it is looking at ‘ways of sharing some elements of BFI Flare digitally’. More information will be available over the next few days. BFI Southbank remains open and operational.  To keep track of cancelled events in London, click here.  Don’t miss your queer film fix. Here’s our list of the best LGBTQ+ films. 

This year’s BFI Flare line-up has been announced – and it’s a doozy

This year’s BFI Flare line-up has been announced – and it’s a doozy

For 34 years, BFI Flare has prided itself on showcasing the best in queer cinema – and 2020’s edition is no different. Kicking off on March 18, the festival has just announced a line-up that includes more than 60 feature films, heaps of special screenings, short films and events, and, of course, the now infamous BFI Flare club nights.  Opening the festival is ‘Cicada’ from writer, director and star Matthew Fifer. Following the non-committal and transient bisexual Ben as he meets handsome stranger Sam, the film is an open and honest look at intimacy and confronting trauma. From the short preview shown at BFI Flare’s launch event, the film looks like it could easily become a quiet and contemplative queer classic, like Andrew Haigh’s ‘Weekend’ or Ira Sachs’s ‘Keep the Lights On’.  The festival will close with ‘Summerland’, a World War II romance starring Gemma Arterton about a woman nursing a broken heart, while the centrepiece screening is ‘Disclosure: Trans Lives on Screen’, a documentary about transgender representation in TV and film.  The festival is split into three themes – Hearts, Minds and Bodies – with many films reflecting a spirit of activism, resistance and rebellion. Highlights include Xavier Dolan’s ‘Matthias & Maxime’, the Henry Golding-starring ‘Monsoon’ from ‘Lilting’ director Hong Khaou, ‘Lingua Franca’, the story of a transwoman navigating life as an immigrant in New York, and the hilarious looking ‘Ellie & Abbie (& Ellie’s Dead Aunt)’ about a lesbian teenage

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