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Auburn Scallon

Auburn Scallon

Auburn Scallon is a travel writer based in Prague. She has written for The Independent, Time Out, Cosmopolitan and more about travel, arts, food and lifestyle.

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Articles (16)

The 28 best things to do in Prague

The 28 best things to do in Prague

Prague is one of the most magical cities in Europe, full of brilliant museums, art galleries, and some cracking food too. It’s one of those places that you could spend a full week in, but you’d be just as well off with three or four days to explore. And beer lovers, you’re going to want to give it a go. Seriously.  The Czech capital is bursting with character, from its curious backstreets to its quirky old-school theatres, and you’re spoilt for choice for things to do. So depending on how long you’re in this beautiful city for, you’re going to need some guidance. And that’s where we come in. Here’s our pick of the most brilliant things to do in Prague this year. RECOMMENDED: 🍽️ The best restaurants in Prague🪩 The best nightlife spots in Prague🛍️ The best spots for shopping in Prague🏨 The best hotels in Prague right now🛏 The best Airbnbs in Prague

The 14 best bars in Prague

The 14 best bars in Prague

Prague’s obsession with beer is no secret. Beer in the Czech Republic is like candy to a baby, and my, do they know how to drink it. It’s no surprise, then, that the beer loving culture lends itself to a seriously good bar scene – but it doesn’t stop at pints of ale and cider. Prague is actually home to a bunch of cool cocktail bars, swanky DJ parties, huge beer gardens and industrial hangouts. Here, the possibilities are endless. Fancy sipping rosé at an outdoor summer film screening? Sure. Cocktails in a swanky bar full of chandeliers and stained glass windows? You got it. The magic of this city’s nightlife is there’s something for absolutely everyone, whether you’re a lover of beer, chicken wings or hidden speakeasies. Read on for the best bars in Prague.  RECOMMENDED:🪩 The best nightlife spots in Prague🍴 The best restaurants in Prague📍 The best things to do in Prague🏨 The best hotels in Prague🏘️ The best Airbnbs in Prague Planning your next trip? Check out our latest travel guides, written by local experts.

The 9 very best museums in Prague

The 9 very best museums in Prague

If you’re in Prague, it’s likely you’ve got just the slightest interest in its culture. After all, Prague is famous for some of the biggest names in the business – Mozart (hello, Prague Symphony), Kafka, and even Einstein all lived in or have links to the city. Unsurprisingly, then, Prague is rich in culture. And one of its most glittering gems? Its museums, of course.  These aren’t just any museums. We’re talking about libraries that stretch for miles, exhibits on communism, and museums dedicated entirely to Franz Kafka himself. We’re talking about Baroque architecture, interactive exhibits and cathedrals that’ll make you pause for a second (or an hour). Whatever your cultural interests, Prague has a museum for you. Here’s our pick of the best.  RECOMMENDED:📍 The best things to do in Prague 🍽️ The best restaurants in Prague🏛️ Unmissable attractions in Prague🎨 Things to do with kids in Prague🛍️ Best places to go shopping in Prague Planning your next trip? Check out our latest travel guides, written by local experts. 

Your essential guide to where to stay in Prague

Your essential guide to where to stay in Prague

It might seem like an obvious thing to say, but Prague is Prague. That is true, but the various districts that make up the Czech capital (22 in total, from Staré Město to Uhříněves) are every bit as distinctive as towns around the country. The old world pomp and circumstance of Prague 1 is a different world to the gritty industrial charms of Prague 5, while a night out in Prague 7 is a different proposition to one in Prague 2. That’s the sort of place the Czech capital is. Luckily for us, Prague has one of the best public transport networks on the continent, so crossing the city is as easy as sitting on a train. That opens up all sorts of options for accommodation, allowing visitors to stay outside the centre while still having easy access to the major sights and sounds of the city. Of course, you can stay in the centre as well as there is no shortage of options. Choosing where to stay in Prague is a joy when faced with all the excellent districts, and we’re here to help you decide which one is right for you. RECOMMENDED: 🛏 Full guide to the best hotels in Prague💃 The best nightlife spots in Prague🏘️ The best Airbnbs in Prague

The 17 best restaurants in Prague

The 17 best restaurants in Prague

It should come to the surprise of absolutely no one that Prague, a city overspilling with fascinating history, endless culture and an unrivalled drinking scene, is also a marvellous destination for all kinds of foodie. The days of the Czech capital being dominated by heavy, substance-first food are over: an increasingly diverse population is transforming Prague into a thriving and exciting food city. Here you’ll find traditional Czech cuisine sitting alongside international innovation and a bunch of estabs catering to a vast variety of dietary requirements. It’s time to add gastronomic excellence to the many, many existing reasons to visit Prague! RECOMMENDED:📍 The best things to do in Prague🪩 The best nightlife spots in Prague🛏 Where to stay in Prague

The 11 best places to go shopping in Prague

The 11 best places to go shopping in Prague

When compiling a list of all the stuff Prague is famous for, shopping might not immediately spring to mind. Sure, this place is full of stunning architecture, captivating museums, quirky history and continentally-renowned bars, but surrounding all that is something else. That’s right, we’re talking shopping.  Prague is a veritable shopper’s paradise, with everything from designer stores and independent boutiques to fun novelty shops – all of which will have you spending your kuna in no time at all. Here’s our guide to the best places to go shopping in the Czech capital.  RECOMMENDED: 📍 The best things to do in Prague😋 The best restaurants in Prague🛏 Where to stay in Prague🏡 The best Airbnbs in Prague

The 5 best day trips from Prague

The 5 best day trips from Prague

The capital city of Prague sits comfortably in the center of Bohemia (the name for the western half of the country), and the Czech borders also include Moravia to the east and the small Selisian area running along the northeastern border with Poland. This rich region of historical importance is filled with plenty of sights, sounds and spa towns to give visitors a well-rounded look at the diversity of Czech culture outside of the city centre's main attractions, museums and things to do. A well-connected network of trains and comfortable bus services make it easy to navigate your journey without the necessity of renting a car. Kutna Hora to the east and Karlštejn Castle to the west offer interesting sights and an escape from the crowds of the capital with accessibility that could get you home in time to make dinner reservations. The birthplace of beer attracts a lively crowd south to Pilsen, while Karlovy Vary’s quiet streets to the west are designed for relaxation. The less famous town of Liberec to the north gives families and independent travelers an option for everyday fun in a more residential setting. Read on for the details on the multi-faceted character of Czech life outside the capital city. RECOMMENDED: The 12 best attractions in Prague

The 12 best clubs in Prague

The 12 best clubs in Prague

Prague knows how to party. The Czech capital has a reputation for being an energetic night out, and let’s just say that it more than lives up to the billing. The best clubs in Prague are all-night affairs, covering everything from EDM bangers to dingy clubs via glitzy swank and more. Truth be told, the theme doesn’t matter; a good night is all but guaranteed.Actually, that is an understatement. Prague is a great night out, a gorgeous city of famous attractions with elite pubs and brilliant bars around every corner. If you were sceptical about Prague’s reputation, these spots will change your mind (and maybe your life). RECOMMENDED: 📍 The best things to do in Prague🪩 The best nightlife spots in Prague🛏 Where to stay in Prague🏡 The best Airbnbs in Prague

Six awesome (and affordable) day trips from Seattle

Six awesome (and affordable) day trips from Seattle

The ability to get from downtown Seattle to the natural beauty of lakes, islands, forests, and the mountains is a big part of the local appeal. Day trips tend to focus on enjoying life outdoors and an undeniably artistic spirit of the Pacific Northwest. Jump in your car or hop on a ferry to see a little more of local life beyond Seattle’s city limits. 

Seven things you didn’t know about Seattle

Seven things you didn’t know about Seattle

Seattle has a bit of an underdog spirit, a lesser-known city in the Pacific Northwest. Some may know as a tech hub, the birthplace of grunge music, or the backdrop for Grey’s Anatomy. For others. it’s the coffee-loving home of Starbucks where it “rains a lot” (though maybe less than you think), or the home base of football fans so loud they once created an earthquake. The largest city in Washington State is full of surprises.   

Things to do in Vinohrady Right Now

Things to do in Vinohrady Right Now

Straddling the divide between Prague 2 and Prague 3 (Prague 10 and a little bit of Prague 1 too, but let’s not muddy the waters too much), Vinohrady has long been the most desirable address in the city for locals and expats alike. The district grew out of the old royal vineyards (hence the name), and the wine still flows today in the neighbourhood’s abundance of classy bars and restaurants. Beer remains king (this is still Prague, after all), but the atmosphere in Vinohrady is a little more refined than in neighbouring Žižkov and Vršovice. Vinohrady is all green spaces, theatre history and elegant churches, often within spitting distance of each other. The neighbourhood also happens to be home to the longest escalator in the European Union, if you’re into that sort of thing, but we’ll stick to the charming cafes and vibrant nightlife. These are the best things to do in Vinohrady, Prague. What to doIf the sun’s shining, the lawns of Riegrovy Sady are sure to be packed with picnickers, partiers and families of all ages, all admiring (or awaiting) the sunset view over the city. This sprawling park also boasts one of the city’s most popular beer gardens, which is packed throughout the long summer months. Jiřího z Poděbrad Square boasts one of Prague's most iconic churches, the Art Nouveau Church of the Most Sacred Heart of Our Lord, which boasts the largest clock-face in Czechia.  Where to eatCover your table in tapas at Kofein. Indulge in high-end vegetarian at Etnosvět or casua

What to do in Nové Město, Prague’s coolest neighbourhood

What to do in Nové Město, Prague’s coolest neighbourhood

What’s the deal with Nové Město? You’d be forgiven for thinking, ‘Ugh, New Town, isn’t that super-touristy?’, but trust us, it’s worth a closer look. Stretching from riverfront to riverfront around the Old Town, the cobblestones quickly smooth into boardwalks, with surrounding parkland offering much-needed inner-city tranquillity. A recent wave of cultural openings show a city refusing to cede its city centre to tourist traps – you can thank a globally-minded, iPhone-wielding younger generation and progressive leadership from the Pirate political party (yes, really) for fighting to maintain Nové Město’s quaint and distinctly local character. Anniversaries and patriotic holidays such as October 28 and November 17 fill Václavské Náměstí (Wenceslas Square) with huge crowds. These demonstrations show a community dedicated to remembering their past while remaining fiercely optimistic about their future as a Central – not ‘Eastern’ – European capital. Communism may be part of the neighbourhood’s history, but life in former Czechoslovakia is three decades in the Czech Republic’s past. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the 50 coolest neighbourhoods in the world If you only do one thing... Photograph: MaxPixel Wander along the Náplavka riverbank, known for its waterside bars and ample swan-spotting opportunities. Following a 2019 renovation, a café and various galleries are now set up within Náplavka’s walls. Go on a Saturday morning and grab a brew from Mama Coffee before browsing the city

Listings and reviews (75)

Rudolfinum

Rudolfinum

This historic building is designed to be admired from all sides. Sculptures of renowned composers stand guard over the columned façade out front (see their website for a legend surrounding the near removal of one). The rounded walls of Dvořák Hall provide the perfect acoustics for the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. The smaller Suk Hall hosts more intimate concerts, private events, and occasional film screenings under a sparkling chandelier. On the bottom floor, contemporary artists decorate the walls of the free-to-enter Galerie Rudolfinum alongside a family-friendly, interactive Artpark. Top off your exploration of the building with a light snack and espresso in the spacious Café Rudolfinum, also on the lower level. Time Out tip: Classical music fans should plan a visit around the Prague Spring Festival (usually May-June) for a full calendar of international performances. Nearby: Lod’ Pivovar: For a delicious dinner and in-house brewery on a boatJewish Museum: For a historical cemetery, synagogues, and moving Holocaust memorial Hemingway Bar: For craft cocktails in a speakeasy-inspired setting

Frantiskanska Zahrada

Frantiskanska Zahrada

Life slows down when you step into this somewhat secret pathway connecting Wenceslas Square to Jungmannovo náměstí. Surrounded by roses woven through white arches and gates, the air in this carefully manicured square is quieter and the vibe is pure relaxation – these bench-lined paths are made for a slower pace of life. A small children’s playground sits below the Church of the Virgin Mary of the Snow, whose rows of tall, slender windows act as a wall to the outside world. As you casually stroll through the garden (remember, slowly is the mantra around here) playful sculptures dance beside you atop cement columns. Say it with me, ahhhhhh. Time Out tip:  Grab some ice cream from the Světozor Passage upon entering for perfect excuse to stop and slurp on a park bench.  Nearby: Styl & Interier: For a locally loved café and interior design showroomPalac Lucerna: For a historic hub of culture, sculpture, and hospitality Nebe: For late-night cocktails and dancing with a well-dressed crowd

U Pinkasu

U Pinkasu

If you don’t find a seat at first glance inside this massive Czech pub, keep looking – every area serves a separate function. The Lawrence Kitchen offers quick, affordable meals (largely to locals) in the 40-seat dining room. Also on the ground floor, the Lower House boasts an unchanged atmosphere from its days frequented by politicians and pub goers for over a century. The Upper House holds additional seating and private events spaces for large groups. The ideal summer spot is in the shade of the narrow Gothic Summer Garden squeezed into the interior courtyard. Of course, you could order something other than beer, but a fresh glass of Pilsner is likely to grace almost every table in the place.  Time Out tip: Make a reservation to (hopefully) guarantee the area of the pub you want to experience – with 100+ years of word-of-mouth marketing, these seats fill up quickly. Nearby: Frantiskanska Zahrada: For a peaceful stroll among roses and sculpturesU Zlateho Tygra: For an informed comparison of the historical pub scene Meat and Greet: For burgers and sweet potato fries with all the dipping sauces

Langhans

Langhans

From the late 1800s to the early 21st century the building’s residents acted to preserve history through photography. Czech portrait photographer Jan Langhans cataloged and maintained a massive collection of glass negatives, painstakingly organized and dubbed the Gallery of Eminent People. Tragically, most of them were destroyed in the 1950s during Communist occupation, but a small selection were discovered and displayed in the early 2000s. Today, the Centrum FotoŠkoda camera shop still operates from the building. Meanwhile, Langhan’s family has since handed over the former gallery space to a non-profit called The People in Need Centre, which focuses on “inspiration, meetings, and discussion for anyone concerned about the world of today.” Time Out tip: The People in Need Centre café serves popular local roasters Mama Coffee and offers free WIFI.  Nearby: U Pinkasu: For a pub with over a century of experience pouring cold PilsnerHome Kitchen: For an innovative selection of soups and weekday lunch options Main Post Office: For a glimpse of bureaucracy housed in frescoed walls and vaulted ceilings

Main Post Office

Main Post Office

You don’t have to spend a cent on postage to enjoy the view in this grand hall of bureaucratic activity. The walls above the functional counter level alternate between tall paned windows and swirling floral frescoes. The vaulted skylights lining the ceiling add a hushed echo to the room as locals routinely take a number to pay bills and post packages while surrounded by architectural beauty. The twenty-two-hour window of operation makes sending last-minute wishes to relatives a possibility no matter what time you finally remember to look up their address, and a stationary shop in the corner sells packing materials to protect any fragile souvenirs.  Time Out tip: Unfortunately, enjoyment is restricted to the eyes only – photography is not allowed inside the post office.   Nearby: Zvonice: For an elegant fine-dining experience inside a bell towerMucha Museum: For a crash course in this Art Nouveau painter’s life and work Manufaktura: For Czech cosmetics infused with beer, wine, and local ingredients

Palace Adria

Palace Adria

The stacked-block appearance of this1920s structure could actually be considered dangerous, considering its bright green sculptural scene distracts pedestrians crossing the streets around Jungmannovo náměstí. The visual stimulation continues inside, where the Association of Art Critics and Theorists curate an art gallery, and the decadent Café Adria offers refreshment in a sophisticated setting. This architectural monument was originally built to house an Italian insurance company in the early 20th century. Visitors on a tight schedule might want to pop in just long enough to get a glimpse of the marbled floors, chandeliers, and ornate twenty-four-hour clock flanked by celestial symbols and signs of the zodiac.  Time Out tip: Stop in around the holiday season to see an ornately decorated Christmas tree in the lobby. Nearby: Franz Kafka Monument: For the mesmerizing rhythm of this rotating puzzle become Kafka’s mirrored faceBlack Angel’s Bar: For old-timey atmosphere and cocktails with history SmetanaQ: For a design-centered café experience with a riverside view

Vaclav Havel Square

Vaclav Havel Square

Prague’s cultural powerhouses cast shadows over this small cement patio, which acts as a gathering space for audience members of the surrounding theaters in the hours before shows. In 2016, the rededication of the square in honor of Vaclav Havel saw the addition a glowing red heart resting on the ground below his signature on the far wall. It’s also, unsurprisingly, a popular location for both organized and impromptu art events, from hosting one of Prague’s free pianos on the street, to a sculptural garden installation of 100+ potted plants, to massive open classes by the Czech National Ballet to mark International Dance Day.  Time Out tip: The square often includes an installation as part of the Prague Signal Festival, a free outdoor light show that draws international crowds each October. Nearby: Cafe NONA: For a pre-performance beverage with fellow arts aficionadosGran Fierro: For delicious red wine and Argentinian steaks pre- or post-show Střelecký Island: For a sliver of tree-lined peace on the Vltava River

Klub Vzorkovna

Klub Vzorkovna

You never know what you’ll stumble upon from one room to the next in this undefined bar and meeting space. The open, multi-room maze reminiscent of a starving artist’s loft or Budapest ruin bar, was created for musicians and creative types to make their own experience. Random pieces of furniture move about the rooms to meet the needs of that night’s crowd, milling among two available pianos and a foosball table. Payment for drinks and bar food requires loading money onto an electronic bracelet at the door as you enter, with a non-refundable deposit of 50 CZK if you don’t manage to spend it all. Time Out tip: Keep an eye out for the giant shaggy canine wandering around, who inspired the local habit of referring to this place as “the dog bar” Nearby: SmetanaQ: For a creative design community that congregates in daylight hoursKmotra Pizzeria: For reasonably-priced Italian food to fuel a night out Super Tramp Coffee: For a hole-in-the-wall courtyard cafe

Střelecký Island

Střelecký Island

This narrow land mass, accessible via stairs from the middle of the Legion Bridge (“Most Legii”), sits basically at water level on the Vltava River. Take a walk to the center of the bridge, roughly parallel to the National Theater, and disappear down below for a quiet stroll under the trees or a moment of reflection on the park benches. Summer often brings free live music, electro-swing dance parties, and outdoor film screenings to this hidden location, but on most days it provides a simple, serene break from the bustling city streets, plus some great photography angles of the surrounding skylines. Time Out tip:  Check the program at www.letnak.cz to see if you can expect a crowd or a quiet night during the summer. Nearby: Jazz Dock: For intimate jazz and blues concerts on a window-lined boatCafe Savoy: For decadent breakfast and baked goods under a chandelier Museum Kampa: For modern art exhibitions from across Central Europe

U Staré Studny

U Staré Studny

Proprietors Tereza Franc and Tomáš Kratochvíl know that they cater to a specialized market by operating a “wine and cognac bar in the country of beer drinkers”. However, their enthusiasm for wine, champagne and a menu of more than 100 types of cognac has translated into a steady stream of visitors flowing in and out of this 14th-century location. The tasting experiences are highly personalized, with formal or casual guidance and food pairings to complement the detailed knowledge of the small producers on offer. Knowledgeable (or novice) groups can show off their expertise by requesting blind taste tests or an aroma wheel competition.  Time Out tip: Add a selection of handmade truffles to truly delight your taste buds. Nearby: Vrtba Garden: For a peaceful oasis of lookout points and landscape designU Modré Kachničky: For a decadent Czech meal with friendly, attentive service Artel Design Store: For intricate, hand-crafted, etched glass to decorate your home

Studentský Klub Celetná and Skautský Institute

Studentský Klub Celetná and Skautský Institute

These recently renovated spaces are run primarily by the communities they serve, providing low-key, affordable locations for young adults to study and socialize. Skautsky Institute, maintained by the local Scouts organization, offers a multi-room café and interior courtyard with a vibe so friendly and mellow that you’ll forget that you’re next door to the Astronomical Clock. The underground cave of Studentsky Club Celetna, just off of Old Town Square, is equipped with tables, sofas, and a small stage for lectures, poetry, and musical performances. Both venues organize a regular events calendar (often in Cech) and are explicitly open and welcoming to international visitors.  Time Out tip: Students always know the best affordable beers beyond big-name breweries– try regional favorites like Svijany and Unětice on draft. Nearby: Old Town Square: For quintessential monuments like the Astronomical Clock and Church of Our Lady before TýnNaše maso: For a quick take-away lunch from a beloved local butcher Cash Only Bar: For unpretentious cocktails and simple bar snacks

Staroměstská mostecká věž

Staroměstská mostecká věž

Take a behind-the-scenes peek inside this imposing 14th-century Gothic entrance to the Charles Bridge (“Karlúv Most”). This decorative arch marked the path of coronation processions for Bohemian kings following the royal route to the Prague Castle. The interior crisscrossed wooden beams and exhibits detailing the bridge’s construction make for a quick interesting pit stop on the way to the main attraction: the tower viewpoint. Spend some time comparing the landscape in each direction of the city – this may not be optional depending on the number of photographers jostling for space. Then stare down at the wall of tourists on the bridge below for a momentary sense of satisfaction that your current location includes some breathing room much better scenery. Time Out tip: Buy a ticket for both bridge towers, even if you’re not sure you want it. The perspectives from either side offer a totally different experience. Nearby: Tricafe: For coffee and breakfast in a cozy, living room atmosphereAbsintherie: For a kitschy, liquor-based education and selection of consumable souvenirs Lehka Hlava For delicious vegetarian food and calm décor that embodies the name “Clear Head”