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Eliza Apperly

Eliza Apperly

Articles (25)

The 11 best restaurants in Munich

The 11 best restaurants in Munich

Here’s hoping you’ve got an appetite when you rock up to one of the best restaurants in Munich because they certainly don’t skimp on the portions here. Munich gets a lot right, but the community-centric heart that beats within is best felt in the city’s cuisine. Everything from Michelin star fine dining to communal chompers can be found, each as delicious as the last.Eating well is one of the best things to do in Munich, full stop. A Village of a Million People doesn’t run on air, after all. You’ll need plenty of energy to visit the world-class museums and concert halls, so stock up on sustenance at these magnificent restaurants.

How to spend 48 hours in Venice

How to spend 48 hours in Venice

How to spend the perfect 48 hours in Venice? To keep things simple, you just need to get lost among the narrow alleyways and romantic bridges and let Venice take you away, right? Sure, but you can never be too organised, even in a place like this. After all, wringing every last drop of magic out of Venice is integral when visiting this famous old place. Visitors can’t afford to miss out on the museums, the restaurants, the iconic attractions, and all the other things to do. With that in mind, here’s the perfect 48-hour itinerary for a long weekend in Venice. You lucky, lucky people.

The best attractions in Hamburg

The best attractions in Hamburg

At various points in its history, Hamburg’s been known as many things. A harbour city, media capital, millionaire’s metropolis and anarchist hub – and occasionally all at once. Germany’s second-largest city offers an intoxicating mix of blustery North Sea winds, rollicking nightlife, rich Hanseatic history and radical politics. Hamburg’s got more bridges than Venice and basks in a crisp northern light. It’s a city defined by its proximity to water, from its Sunday morning Fischmarkt and the picturesque Strandperle beach through to the Schanzenviertel, the traditional – if now much gentrified – heart of Hamburg counter-culture. It’s a city of contrasts: of the red light thrill of the Reeperbahn and world-class cultural institutions like the Elbphilharmonie and the Hamburger Kunsthalle. As you can no doubt already guess, Hamburg is a pretty darn difficult place to sum-up in a couple of paragraphs. So read on for our top 10 best attractions in this gloriously diverse, multifaceted, un-pin-downable city. This article includes affiliate links. These links have no influence on our editorial content. For more information, click here.

The 9 best attractions in Munich

The 9 best attractions in Munich

The best attractions in Munich represent everything that makes this city such a thrilling visit, from its outstanding art museums to delicious food markets. Munich is famous for its beer gardens and for good reasons, but the best things to do here will offer you plenty of distractions to keep you out of the booze tents – for a while at least. When you come to Munich, you often come for the infamous beer scene, but leave with memories of museums, gardens and glistening mountain spas. So, if it's the best of the best you're after – the cream of the crop, the top table – you've come to the right place, because we've rounded up our favourite Munich attractions. This article includes affiliate links. These links have no influence on our editorial content. For more information, click here.

The 9 absolute best Hamburg bars

The 9 absolute best Hamburg bars

Now we’re talking! A night out in Hamburg is an experience you’ll never forget. Berlin might get international attention and Munich the famous festivals, but the nightlife in Hamburg might top the lot. There is something in the air here, and the harbour town has been lining up the drinks for centuries at this point. There is more to nighttime fun in Hamburg than St Pauli and the raucous Reeperbahn, but don’t dismiss them outright. After all, it is an integral part of the city’s identity, and you’ll find some seriously fun bars around there. Of course, if you fancy something a little different, harbour views and glitz awaits elsewhere. The best bars in Hamburg run the gamut of modern society, and we love it. Put bluntly, going out is one of the best things you can do in Hamburg, Drank somewhere on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDrinkList. You can also find out more about how Time Out makes recommendations and reviews bars.

The 9 best restaurants in Hamburg

The 9 best restaurants in Hamburg

Whisper it, but Hamburg might be Germany’s finest foodie destination. Actually, no, forget whispering, locate the nearest megaphone and scream it from the rooftops, because the food here deserves total celebration. Seafood lovers have a particular reason for excitement, as Germany’s largest port is famous for serving the best fish found in this part of the world. People have been eating well here for centuries, and many more centuries of gluttonous glory awaits. All that is well and fine, but what are the best restaurants in Hamburg? We’re glad you asked because we’ve done the hard yards (by which we mean “eaten loads of food”) and compiled the best of the best into handy selection, from local favourites to fine-dining fancies. All are worth devouring before you head out to a night on the tiles in this famous city. Eaten somewhere on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutEatList.

Your essential guide to where to stay in Munich

Your essential guide to where to stay in Munich

There are a lot of things to do in Munich. The Bavarian beauty has stellar museums to go along with its blossoming gastronomic scene, and the thrill of drinking beer in this city goes without saying. Alas, you can’t enjoy all that Munich has to offer if you happen to be dog-tired, and finding the right place to stay is of optimum importance here. With that in mind, we’ve compiled your essential guide on where to stay in Munich, from architecturally awesome Altstadt to LGBTQ+ friendly Glockenbach. Munich is a fascinating place no matter where you find yourself, and you can’t go wrong no matter the neighbourhood you choose. The best remains the best though, and the areas collated here bring their unique atmospheres to the table. Check out our list of the best things to do in Munich, and then consult the neighbourhood guide to construct the perfect getaway to the Village of a Million People. Well, 1.5 million now, but you get the point. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best things to do in Munich

The 12 best bars in Munich

The 12 best bars in Munich

When you think about drinking alcohol in Munich, the chances are that beer will be the first and last thing that jumps to mind. Why wouldn’t it be? The Bavarian beauty is home to the world’s biggest beer festival, after all, as well as famous beer cellars and the world’s best beer gardens. The sheer number of times the word “beer” features in this opening paragraph is proof enough of the amber nectar’s dominance. There is much more to Munich’s bar scene than steins, however, and the last decade or so has seen the emergence of a thriving cocktail scene. Mixologists are making their presence felt in Munich, making the most of gin, rum, vodka and all the rest. Beer is king here, but the best bars in Munich show that there are plenty more strings to this tasty bow. Drank somewhere on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDrinkList. You can also find out more about how Time Out makes recommendations and reviews bars here.

The 20 best things to do in Germany

The 20 best things to do in Germany

It’s been nearly 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall led to the reunification of Germany, brought an optimistic end to the country’s devastating 20th century and gave rise to a whole slew of historically significant, always fun things to do in Germany. Today, this leading European player has seen remarkable resurgence, reconnecting with the rich past that preceded the Third Reich, while painstakingly documenting its fascist and fractured years, and carefully nurturing a thriving contemporary culture. From Carolingian splendour at Aachen Cathedral to the Bauhaus School in Dessau, quintessential Romanticism at the Hamburger Kunsthalle to the anniversary exhibition at Karl Marx’s House in Triere, Germany promises an astonishing historical reach of art, ideas and music. Outdoor travelers are also in for a treat: Whether you head for the Alpine lake of Königssee, the rugged coastline on Rügen or the much-mythologized forests of the Schwarzwald, Germany preserves a state of wilderness hard to find in other European countries. Beyond historic and cultural sites, be sure to eat and drink your way through the best restaurants in Germany. No matter what strikes your fancy, there's no going wrong with our guide to the best things to do in the city. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere. Find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world.

Where to stay in Hamburg

Where to stay in Hamburg

Ah, Hamburg. From the craziness of a night out in St Pauli to a sleepy afternoon browsing the world-class art galleries with mates, we never tire of spending time in Germany’s second largest city. Culture vultures can get their fix of Old Masters and the Elbphilharmonie, while barflies won’t suffer for lack of beer. Ultimately, this is just a city with loads of things to do. The neighbourhoods all have their distinct flavours and, understandably, attract slightly different crowds. Altstadt is the place to be if you love a high-end boutique, a good smattering of historic architecture and exhibitions galore. Alternately, caffeine-fiends in need of a cup of the good stuff should make a bee-line to Schanzenviertel. Or, if you’re in the market for a blow-out meal and lovely views of the river Elbe, try Blankenese for Michelin-starred dining at Hamburg’s top restaurants and the city’s poshest hotels.

The 5 absolute best day trips from Munich

The 5 absolute best day trips from Munich

Even for Munich locals and loyalists, it’s what’s outside of town that captivates as much as the southern German metropolis itself. So when you’ve finished visiting Munich’s excellent array of attractions and things to do, take advantage of the city’s prime location and venture on a day trip. The walled town of Rothenburg ob der Tauber is the quaintest, best preserved medieval city imaginable – and thanks to its thriving Christkindlmarket, the ideal winter getaway. With the Alps on the horizon, there are plenty of stunning mountain destinations and activities a short ride away too, from hiking and skiing in Garmisch-Patenkirchen to the vertiginous mix of Nazi history and pristine landscape at Berchtesgaden. The shattering legacy of the Third Reich continues at the Memorial Site of Dachau, Germany’s first concentration camp where 41,500 prisoners lost their lives. With so many options, there’s only one thing for it – time to get out and explore. Head on one of these day trips from Munich and we guarantee that, one way or another, you’ll be profoundly moved.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best things to do in Munich

The 9 absolute best hotels in Munich

The 9 absolute best hotels in Munich

Forget Vienna. Forget Geneva. This city’s Italianate flair, mountain views and world-class art collections make it quite simply one of the most refined places you could imagine. In fact, many would argue Munich is far and away the most charming European city there is. And that’s no doubt thanks also to its phenomenal array of killer restaurants and things to do.  So whether you’re in town for the opera, en route to the ski slopes or touring Munich’s mind-blowing museums and attractions, it’s no surprise there are plenty of superb places to spend the night. Choose serene design hotel Louis, the simple yet homey Laimer Hof or the historic splendour of the Bayerischer Hof, and rest assured you’ll be booking one of the best hotels in Munich.

Listings and reviews (57)

Kleine Konditorei

Kleine Konditorei

Sample Hamburg’s cinnamon-dusted answer to the croissant at award-winning bakery, Kleine Konditiorei. The Franzbrötchen at this classic Hamburg bakery are award-winning morsels of sugar and cinnamon deliciousness. Pair one with a coffee for a perfect early morning fix, and perhaps pick up some superb fresh breads while you’re there; the Karottenbrötchen (carrot bun) and Mehrkornbrötchen (wholegrain bun) come particularly recommended. Kleine Konditiorei has four branches, all in the Eimsbüttel district.   Time Out tip: Taste too good to leave in Hamburg? German home baking brand Janolade does a ready-made Hamburger Franzbrötchen mix.

Atlantic Restaurant

Atlantic Restaurant

The restaurant at the Atlantic Kempinksi, Hamburg’s most famous luxury hotel, was first established to cater to first-class passengers setting off on transatlantic liners. Their in-house recipe dates back to the early 20th century, when top chef Franz Pfordte took over the hotel’s culinary helm, and its many famous fans include Rod Stewart, who declared it the best lobster soup in the world. Time Out tip: Fancy an aperitif? The Art Deco Atlantic Bar is one of Hamburg’s ultimate see-and-be-seen nightspots.

Brücke 10

Brücke 10

It’s all about the harbour views and hearty Fischbrötchen at this Elbe-side locale. If you don’t make it to the Sunday morning Fischmarkt, your next best bet for a classic fish sandwich is Brücke 10, a bright and nautical little locale neatly perched on the Elbe and specializing in all things fish. It’s a little pricier than your regular market stall, but worth it for the great harbour views and the sizeable, salty portions. Pair with an ice-cold Astra and sit outside if the sun’s out. Time Out tip: Hop on public Ferry #62 from the nearby Landungsbrücken for the best-priced tour around the harbour.

Imbiss bei Schorsch

Imbiss bei Schorsch

For a classic Currywurst fix, Hamburgers swear by Imbiss bei Schorsch, a minute, cult locale in the St.Pauli district. Little more than a hole-in-the-wall, it makes up for its limited space (and almost non-existent seating) with big, sizzling spicy sausage flavours and its hearty in-house potato salad, which replaces the more common Currywurst accompaniment of chips. Time Out tip: Less sure about the spice? Then simply order yourself the Bratwurst (fried sausage).

Köz Urfa

Köz Urfa

Competition is strong, but many Hamburgers insist that Köz Urfa does simply the best Turkish food in town. The bustling and brightly-lit neighbourhood joint right by Hamburg-Altona station delivers huge portions and succulent flavours, with fast, friendly service. You can take your food to go, or sit down and settle into a vast Döner Teller (platter), complete with rice, salad, and veggies. There’s also a good run of vegetarian dishes. Time Out tip: Note that Köz Urfa does not serve alcohol.

Kartoffelkeller

Kartoffelkeller

On Hamburg’s most historic street, the Deichstrasße, Kartoffelkeller is a cosy, unfussy place which makes a great choice for a simple, warming winter lunch. As the name suggests, it embraces all possible ways of cooking potato: soup, dumplings, pan-fried rösti or baked in foil with a choice of toppings, from mushroom sauce to smoked salmon with a honey, dill and mushroom dressing. There are also seasonal specials, including kale dishes in winter and tender white asparagus (Spargel) in spring. End things on a sweet note with the Rote Grütze for dessert. Time Out tip: Do take a wander down the Deichstraße and admire some of the oldest surviving buildings in Hamburg.

Fritz im Pyjama

Fritz im Pyjama

Fritz im Pyjama upgrades the hostel concept bigtime. Its “budget boutique” lodgings include single, double and triple rooms, each compact in size but seriously generous on light, comfort and classy design credentials—think smooth wooden floorboards and crisp white bed linens, offset by statement wallpaper. The hotel sits in the heart of the Sternschanze, once a hotbed of activism and dissent, now neighborhood of choice for stylish students, media professionals and many visitors to the city. Fritz does not have an in-house dining area, but there are breakfast options in the mini-bar and plenty of cafes and eateries nearby.

Hotel Village

Hotel Village

Almost directly opposite the central station, there’s little mistaking Hotel Village’s former identity as a thriving Hamburg brothel. Though it now operates as a regular hotel, it has retained much of its lascivious aesthetic, from the lace curtains cascading before the windows to the mirrored ceilings and pervasive palette of red, red and more red. A popular place for magazine shoots, it’s a good choice for travellers who enjoy somewhere quirky and characterful. You should only be aware that while Hotel Village has given up on the sex trade, much of its immediate vicinity has not and some travellers find the surrounding neighbourhood a little too sketchy.

25hours Hotel HafenCity

25hours Hotel HafenCity

This funky installment from the 25 Hours chain is situated towards HafenCity, Hamburg’s recently redeveloped harbor district and proud home to the new Elbphilharmonie. With the waterfront and warehouse district in walking distance, it’s a great neighborhood in which to get a sense of Hamburg’s seafaring identity, though relatively quiet by night. Each of the hotel’s “cabins” combine compact style with maritime touches, whether lit globes or rope ladders. After a sweet night’s sleep, enjoy the breakfast buffet at the Heimat Küche and Bar, which also has snack, set and à la carte dinner menus. 25 Hours has a meeting room, fitness area, sauna and reception will happily sort you out with bikes or Minis to ride about town.

Generator Hostels

Generator Hostels

A great choice for backpackers, the Hamburg branch of Generator Hostels is located near to the central station in a former recording studio where John, Paul, George and Ringo once famously played. As well as its music history credentials, it offers good twin, double, triple and quad rooms, mixed dormitories for up to eight, and a women-only dorm. Dorm beds start at 16 EUR per night. The design throughout Generator is hip and refreshing, with exposed brick walls, big floor-to-ceiling windows and works by local artists. There are plenty of additional comforts too, including a laundry service, rental bikes and the vibrant Helter Skelter bar that’s as popular with locals as it is with hostel guests.  

Pyjama Park St. Pauli

Pyjama Park St. Pauli

If you’re in Hamburg for a raucous night out, you can’t get closer to the action than Pyjama Park, situated right on the Reeperbahn. Great for singles, couples and groups, it offers hotel rooms with an en-suite or hostel rooms (from single to six-bed) with shared bathrooms. Forget musky dormitories and dodgy plumbing; Pyjama Park is crisp and colourful, with white furnishings, fresh flowers and vibrant murals. Common areas include a spacious roof terrace and the on-site Pyjama Bar. With this kind of proximity to St. Pauli revelry, earplugs and eye masks come in handy, but if you’ve opted for this part of town, chances are you’ll be out till dawn anyway.

Arcade Hostel Hamburg

Arcade Hostel Hamburg

Out in the north-western reaches of Hamburg, this small budget lodging is some distance from Hamburg’s main sights, but with prices starting at EUR 38 for a single room, it’s a good choice for low-budget travellers who don’t need to be super central, or don’t mind a train ride into town. Though a fairly un-prepossessing building, it’s well kept and clean, with a tidy outdoor area. As well as single, double and triple bedrooms, there are family suites for four, including a small pantry kitchen and lounge area. Staff is friendly and helpful, and there’s a supermarket and restaurant around the corner.