Best local jewellery brands in Singapore

Rock striking arm candy or keep it minimal with beautifully crafted accessories from these local jewellery brands.
By Michelle Ng |
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Shopping, Jewellery

Carrie K

icon-location-pin Rochor

The full works

Artisan-crafted jewellery that carry meaningful reminders of what’s important in life – that’s at the heart of all Carrie K’s designs. Launched by Carolyn Kan in 2008, Carrie K stocks an extensive range that runs the gamut from silver and semi-precious ready-to-wear designs for everyday wear to bespoke fine jewellery if, to quote Bey, you’re looking to put a ring on it.

The signature The Reborn collection, in particular the Nut and Bolt unisex bracelet ($198), has been a crowd-favourite since its inception in 2011. The hand-braided leather bracelet features a clasp that reimagines its namesake hardware, and has matching earrings ($298) and rings ($228) – the latter two comes with added bling for that extra bit of sparkle.

[in]trigue

[in]trigue

Nature at its best

To celebrate Mother Nature in all its beauty, [in]trigue uses only natural and untreated gemstones – in both their raw and polished forms – in the its jewellery. Founder Jaime Lim applies her architectural background into her jewellery making to form, err, intriguing geometric shapes. Each piece is handmade and only produced in small quantities – you can put in a request for any particular stone and Lim will try to fulfil it.

The signature Gaea Pearl Ring ($59) contrasts a unique stone, such as moonstone and aquamarine, with a pearl. This simple and versatile design has proven popular among mothers with young babies as its rounded smooth edges are child-friendly.

See in-trigue.com for stockists.

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Average Jo

Average Jo

Clay play

Jomaine Koo, who goes by the moniker Average Jo, elevates humble clay into quirky, colourful necklaces, earrings and brooch pins that’ll liven up even your gloomiest outfit (and day). Using polymer clay, Average Jo has recently expanded to include pottery products (from $15) and a limited-edition run of enamel pins illustrated by Koo and produced in Singapore – we can safely say that this onewoman- shop isn’t that average, after all.

The signature Geometric necklace ($32-$39). You can customise the colours and number of beads – each facet of the bead is hand cut and formed so no two beads are alike.

shopaveragejo.com

Shopping, Jewellery

Choo Yilin

icon-location-pin Orchard

Reinterpreting traditions

A purveyor of modern jade jewellery, Choo Yilin pays homage to Asian culture and heritage with its contemporary interpretations of si dian jin (four-piece gold jewellery set) and heritage inspired personalised wedding bands. In its ready-to-wear collections, the brand weaves intricate metalwork detailing with handpicked Burmese jadeite and vibrant, semi-precious gemstones – bespoke options available, too.

The signature Peranakan Flower Si Dian Jin (from $5,000). The four-piece set takes inspiration from the floral motifs of the kebaya and showcases semi-precious gemstones of varying hues from rhodolite garnet, pink amethyst and white topaz.

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Pinwheel Jewels

Pinwheel Jewels

A piece of home

It’s all about the Singapore spirit at Pinwheel Jewels. This fine jewellery label used to retail international fashion jewellery brands such as Kenneth Jay Lane, but it has since filtered its offerings down to just one locally designed and crafted line: The Singapore Island Collection. Originally created to celebrate our golden jubilee, in 2015, this range of delicate necklaces, bracelets and pins features pendants shaped in the silhouette of Singapore – albeit back in 1965.

The signature The Singapore Island Collection ($99-$148), made from sterling silver and plated with 18K gold. The Singapore Island Necklace in white gold ($148) is the original ‘little red dot’ design that started this collection, and it features a single red crystal accent.

See pinwheeljewels.com for stockists.

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