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The best things to do this week in NYC

Find the biggest and best events, activities and things to do in New York City this week, as chosen by Time Out's editors

Photograph: Joseph Moran
Shakespeare in the Park

Electric Zoo Festival

Critics' pick

New York—just like the rest of the world—goes gaga for EDM (electronic dance music) and shows its love at this annual three-day dayglo rave-up on Randall’s Island. In its six year history, the fest has seen headlining DJ sets and live performances from Skrillex, Deadmau5, Avicii, Pete Tong and Moby—yep, the big names.

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Randalls Island Park, Randall's Island Friday September 4 2015 - Sunday September 6 2015

US Open

Critics' pick

For two weeks each summer, New York becomes the capital of the tennis world as the sport's final Grand Slamthwacks its way into Queens. Watch stars play under the lights during the popular evening sessions.

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USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, Queens Until Sunday September 13 2015

Warm Up at MoMA PS1

Critics' pick

After 18 years, MoMA PS1's Warm Up is bigger than ever, with music aficionados and sun-worshipping revelers flocking to the museum's courtyard to take in the top-tier lineup of bands, DJs and producers, along with the same great taste in art, beer and food it's boasted from the beginning.

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MoMA PS1 , Long Island City Saturday September 5 2015

Dollypalooza: An Epic Fan Tribute to Dolly Parton

Critics' pick

Dolly Parton is a national treasure, right up there with the Washington Monument and the Golden Gate Bridge (although much better looking and possessing a more pleasant singing voice). This event, presented by nightlife vet Bevin Branlandingham and World Famous *BOB*, is a tribute to the living legend and all the good times and great songs she's shared with us over the years. Performers include DJ Nath Ann Carrera, Merrie Cherry, Sequinette, Lady Quesa'Dilla, West Vargina, Crimson Kitty and the Parton cover band Doll Parts. Come on down, y'all!

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Littlefield, Gowanus Friday September 4 2015

Coney Island Beard and Moustache Competition

Critics' pick

Let your beard hang low for this eighth annual competition, hosted by emcee Adam RealMan and That Metal Show's Don Jamieson. Awards include Best Moustache (both Natural and Styled), Best Fake Beard and Worst in Show. In addition to the follicular feats, check out performances by sideshow starlets Betty Bloomerz and Serpentina and stand-up from Jim Daly. Competitor registration starts at 6pm.

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Sideshows by the Seashore, Brooklyn Saturday September 5 2015

Jonny Woo: Glitter in the Groove

Critics' pick

London-based nightlife/art/drag star Jonny Woo comes to town with a night of comedy, music and more.

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Laurie Beechman Theatre at the West Bank Cafe, Hell's Kitchen Until Saturday September 5 2015

West Indian-American Day Carnival

Critics' pick

This Caribbean celebration, known for having lively music and lots of skin, is never short on costumed stilt dancers, floats blaring soca and calypso music, and plenty of flags from countries such as Barbados, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago. Look for vendors stationed along Eastern Parkway selling island eats like jerk chicken, curry goat and oxtail. Early risers can preparty at J’ouvert (pronounced “joo-VAY”), a predawn festival in which revelers throw powdered paint at each other. Head to Grand Army Plaza around 4am when the high jinks really get going. Eastern Pkwy from Schenectady Ave to Flatbush Ave, Crown Heights, Brooklyn. Subway: 3, 4, 5 to Crown Hts-Utica Ave.

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Grand Army Plaza, Prospect Park Monday September 7 2015

Great North River Tugboat Race & Competition

Critics' pick

See tugboats parade from Pier 84 to the 79th Street Boat Basin then race back at the 21st annual iteration of this maritime fest. Participate in an amateur line-toss contest, and witness the Popeye-inspired spinach-eating contest. Those interested in a closer view can board a Circle Line spectator boat at Pier 83 (9am; $25, children $12).

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Hudson River Park, Pier 84, Hell's Kitchen Sunday September 6 2015

Damon Wayans

Critics' pick

As with many no-longer-young comics, this member of the Wayans clan now focuses his material on the vagaries of family and parenting, but he’s still essentially the same guy we fell in love with on In Living Color. And if you look closely, you can still make out the fluffy wig, bulbous red nose and loaded sock of Homey D. Clown.

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Carolines on Broadway, Midtown West Until Sunday September 6 2015

Amy

Anyone with a beating heart will be forgiven for allowing it to break during this unflinching and thoughtful account of the life of soul singer Amy Winehouse. Moving from Winehouse’s first steps into the music business in 2001 to her death in 2011 at just 27, Amy gives equal weight to her talent and the tragedy of its loss. Smartly, the film refuses to offer easy answers to explain her demise.—Dave Calhoun 

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Ant-Man

Marvel’s smallest origin story begins with scientist Hank Pym (Douglas), the inventor of a top-secret particle capable of shrinking ordinary objects down to insect size. Ousted from his own tech company, Hank needs a skilled stooge to break into his old lab and steal some research, and sweet-natured thief Scott Lang (Rudd) is the only man for the job. Rudd is inhibited in the role, as if he felt there was too much at stake, and that impulse to play it safe typifies a film that shrinks in the face of a challenge.—David Ehrlich

 

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Now Showing

The Diary of a Teenage Girl

Yay for this indie drama, which breaks Hollywood rules about adolescent female sexuality with Lena Dunham levels of brutal honesty (and humor). It’s the story of precocious 15-year-old Minnie (British actor Powley, terrific), growing up in 1970s San Francisco. Dangerously curious, Minnie slips into a relationship
with her mother’s boyfriend, Monroe (Skarsgård). It’s a squirm-inducing idea to build a plot around, but to the movie’s credit, the sex is dealt with sensitively, always with a woman’s perspective in mind.—Cath Clarke

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Now Showing

Dope

Rick Famuyiwa’s comedy follows three high-school nerds who call Los Angeles’ frightening Inglewood home. It’s a euphorically funny indie that flips the script on Boyz n the Hood.

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Now Showing

The End of the Tour

Reporter David Lipsky (Eisenberg) spent five days in 1996 with novelist David Foster Wallace (Segel), recording their back-and-forth over car rides and late-night junk food. Both leads are thorny and excellent, but Segel turns the film into a feast of subtle fragility.—Joshua Rothkopf

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Now Showing

Fantastic Four

Reed Richards (Teller) and his bulky best-pal-cum-bodyguard Ben Grimm (Bell) are set to work on the world’s first inter-dimensional teleportation device. Soon, Reed and Ben trip
off to a parallel universe in the company of similarly nerdy youngsters Sue Storm (Kate Mara) and her adopted brother Johnny (Jordan). But after an encounter with an energy force, the quartet returns with superpowers and are immediately whisked off by shady government forces.The second half is nothing more than a roundelay of superhero tics: lame catchphrases, brain-grinding exposition and lifeless action scenes, the talented cast overwhelmed by iffy special effects.—Tom Huddleston

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Now Showing

The Gift

Edgerton slides effortlessly behind the camera with this satisfying, smart and darkly unnerving psychological thriller in which the perfect life of a seemingly perfect couple is smashed to smithereens when they move to a new suburb and bump into an oddball who begins to turn up with creepy presents.—Daisy Bowie-Sell

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Inside Out

Critics' pick

Pixar’s fun, near-experimental latest will have kids straining to listen to imaginary voices in their heads—those are the real stars of the movie: Joy (Poehler), Fear (Hader), Anger (Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith). At times, you ache to put the brakes on the chaos, but the animation studio once again turns childhood into the stuff of rare and riveting adventure.—DC

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Now Showing

Irrational Man

Woody Allen’s latest, a deadly straight drama, gives us Abe (Phoenix), a philosophy lecturer at a small East Coast college. Rita (Posey) is a fellow professor who wants to sleep with him, while student Jill (Stone) insists that her interest is purely platonic. It all feels pretty familiar for Woody: the tortured genius, the younger woman, the world closing in on our antihero. But there’s something sloppy about Irrational Man, even by Allen’s uneven standards.—DC

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Now Showing

Jurassic World

The slickly entertaining sequel has no reason for being (except for the obvious one), but at least it chomps your time painlessly. There’s a fully functioning tourist attraction on the haunted grounds of Isla Nublar some 22 years after the first film, complete with a Starbucks and huge crowds. Subtly—between generic action sequences—the movie celebrates money and itself, not science.—JR

 

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“Messing with MoMA: Critical Interventions at the Museum of Modern Art, 1939–Now”

MoMA has never been shy about about making itself the main character in the story of Modern Art. The institutions's carefully cultivated power and prestige has been catnip for the certain artists wanting in, while being too impatient to wait for MoMA's seal of approval. Yayoi Kusama’s late ’60s be-in in the Sculpture Garden and Tony Shafrazi’s defacement of Picasso’s Guernica are just some of the antics that the Modern has apparently decided to co-opt for its own narrative, judging from this exhibit of documentary ephemera. It recounts the various artists over the decades who have staged protests, surreptitiously hung work in MoMA’s galleries or otherwise made their presence felt without a formal invitation.

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Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Midtown West Until Monday September 28 2015

Rachel Goodyear, "Restless Guests"

The British artist specializes in surreal, finely rendered drawings that make the everyday dreamlike through odd juxtapositions of images and hints of narrative that never quite cohere.

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Drawing Center, Soho Until Sunday February 28 2016

“Leighton’s Flaming June”

An associate of the Pre-Raphaelites, Bristish artist Sir Frederic Leighton (1830-1896) favored classical and biblical allegories, but his true metier, perhaps, lay in the portrayal of female subjects. Near the end of his career, he drifted away from narrative subjects to embrace the Modernist philosophy of “art for art’s sake.” His late masterpiece, Flaming June, was painted the year before his death, and its depiction of a sleeping nymph, curled up in a diaphanous bright-orange gown, is almost a pure color study. Returning to New York for the first time in 35 years, the painting is presented here alongside four full-length portraits by James McNeill Whistler from the Frick’s collection.

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The Frick Collection, Lenox Hill Until Sunday September 6 2015

“Javier Porto & Ricky Powell: The Incredible Keith”

The 1980s were a particularly vibrant moment for New York’s art world. Pop Art had been a thing in the 1960s, but after nearly a decade of Conceptualism and Minimalism during the 1970s, Pop came roaring back, this time enlivened by hip-hop, graffiti and the downtown club scene. Probably no artist embodied the zeitgeist better than Keith Haring, who went from doing drawings in the subway to showing in the hottest galleries of the day. It was during this period that Javier Porto and Ricky Powell, two photographers working independently, captured Haring and his milieu, including ’80s luminaries, such as Grace Jones, Robert Mapplethorpe and Andy Warhol.

"Robert Seydel: The Eye in Matter”

Seydel (1960–2011) was poet and artist whose works recall those of a self-taught visionary. Seydel, however, was no outsider having graduate with a BFA in literature from NYU and an MFA in photography from RISD. He combined his passion for literature and art in whimsical collages and “journal pages” created by his alter-ego, Ruth Greisman, a name shared with his aunt. Found photographs, magazine images, detritus from the street and more went into his creations, which recall similar works by Schwitters, Ernst and Cornell.

Comments

9 comments
Chris O
Chris O

Is anyone going to any of these? Possibly in Brooklyn? 

Cecily O
Cecily O

"Drinking with Dorothy" is at the Player's Theatre, Macdougal St. on June 5 & 6 at 10pm. Tickets : $12. 

Based on Dorothy Parker's stories, this in an evening of alcohol-fuelled romance and music, presented by 2Time Theatre.

Claire B
Claire B

Basque Cider House is this Sunday at Txikito! Michelin rated James Beard nominated Chefs prepare a Curated dinner highlighting Basque cultural appreciation through specially crafted Ciders and Art including projections and documentary film. Eder Montero, Alex Raij, Emily Lobsenz and Leah Rinaldi invited me to unique experience of a tradition. This Sunday, March 29th at 6, Totally worth sharing!

Mark W
Mark W

The BEST, and longest-running, Dueling Pianos show in NYC - SHAKE RATTLE & ROLL DUELING PIANOS - 10pm every Saturday night.  All request rock n roll party.  Part concert, part cabaret, part comedy - all fun!


The Cellar @ 22 Warren St. NYC 10007

www.ShakeRattleRollPianos.com for tix and info!

Beatrice B
Beatrice B

Have to see Queen. Lambert is no impersonator! I saw them in Chicago and again in Vegas, now MSG. This show deserves a 4 star !!! That if you like great music and a front man with an amazing voice and commands the stage. Its like hearing Queen for the first time . Go see this show, if you can get seats !

Blair Y
Blair Y

how about the Spike Lee block party in Brooklyn...