The best things to do this week in NYC

Find the biggest and best events, activities and things to do in New York City this week, as chosen by Time Out's editors

Photograph: Erin Baiano
Stop Hitting Yourself

"Pheromone Hotbox"

A group of female artists (Amanda Charchian, Aneta Bartos, Shae Detar, Olivia Locher and Marianna Rothen) challenge the concept of post-feminist ideologies by each presenting 10 of their most recent photographs that portray womanhood. All five photographers are known for often including nudity and illustrating elusive stories in their work.

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Steven Kasher Gallery Tuesday January 27 2015 - Saturday February 28 2015

Live Dubbed Sitcoms

Critics' pick

Watch improvisers live-dub over muted sitcoms, giving shows like Full House and Family Matters random and hilarious new story lines.

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Videology Thursday January 29 2015

Tinder Live

Critics' pick

As if it weren't hilarious enough in real life, Tinder (the wildly popular dating app) gets exposed in this comedy show. If you're hoping for some swiping tips (no matter how ridiculous), this is the event for you.

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Knitting Factory Wednesday January 28 2015

Jack White

Critics' pick

Jack White's genius is undoubtedly bolstered by an uncompromising workaholism—evidenced by a long series of sharp side projects (The Raconteurs, the Dead Weather), collaborations (Wanda Jackson, Insane Clown Posse) and the prolific output of his Third Man label—as well a recent solo LP, Lazaretto, that handily sums up his patented roots-punk eccentricity. Hear White work his magic at this Madison Square Garden victory lap.

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Madison Square Garden Friday January 30 2015

Jazz & Colors

The Jazz & Colors event, which spread out across Central Park in 2012 and 2013, moves indoors, while retaining its core premise: a bunch of jazz combos muse on a predetermined set of standards. For this installment, musicians including Amir ElSaffar, Don Byron, Linda Oh, Brandee Younger, the Jazz at Lincoln Center Youth Orchestra and Jenny Scheinman spread out across the Met, soundtracking your tour of the museum's masterworks. This'll be a treat.

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art Friday January 30 2015

Whitney Cummings

Critics' pick

Cummings, a Chelsea Lately regular, sidesteps the merely spunky with the aid of a tart tongue and enough vitriol to knock down all idiots she encounters. Her recent work, including Comedy Central special I Love You, has detailed the little stupidities inherent in relationships.

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Carolines on Broadway Thursday January 29 2015 - Saturday January 31 2015

Winter Carnival at Bryant Park

Winter is here and it ain’t leaving anytime soon. Enjoy it with the inaugural Winter Carnival at Bryant Park, where you can take free curling lessons, taste soothing hot chocolate and enjoy some of the best seasonal ales at the Outdoor Winter Brew House. See short plays by the Drilling Company on Fri 30 at 5pm, and come back on Sat 31 at 7pm for the Silent Disco.  

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Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park Friday January 30 2015 - Saturday January 31 2015 Free

Queer Memoir: Naked

Critics' pick

For its fifth anniversary show, Kelli Dunham's LGBT storytelling series's theme is "naked," which may translate to metaphorical or literal flesh baring. Participating potentially nude artists include M. Taueret Davis, Sarah Schulman, Erica Cardwell, Elana Lancaster, Robin Cloud, J Mase III, Drae Campbell and Vivien J Rotundo.

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Bowery Arts and Sciences Sunday February 1 2015

Outsider Art Fair

Since the first Outsider Art Fair some 22 years, interest in self-taught and folk artists has grown exponentially in the art world—so much so that the genre has had a major stylistic impact on many insider artists, including some with MFAs from the most important graduate programs in the country. This fair remains the premier showcase for this category of work, with a reach that's become worldwide.

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Center 548 Thursday January 29 2015 - Sunday February 1 2015

"Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs"

Critics' pick

The explanatory text on the wall at the beginning of MoMA’s blockbuster of around one hundred of Henri Matisse’s cut-outs notes that these well-known works attempted to resolve the “eternal conflict of drawing and color.” Epic though that reconciliation may have been, it feels faraway and quaint these days. Despite his immense popularity, Matisse’s emphasis on formal innovation and aesthetic pleasure may make him the modern master most alien to the dry, over-intellectualized “conceptual” maneuvers that fill so many New York galleries. Thus, this rather glorious exhibition feels tonic. Matisse first took scissors to paper in the 1930s to work out figural compositions for murals and theater curtains, representing dancers with schematic forms alternately sinuous and angular, and counterintuitively achieving a remarkable feeling of movement and gravity with ostensibly unwieldy materials. During World War II, he used the technique to create the great artist book Jazz (1947). The book’s circus theme, bright hues, and delightfully recognizable flat shapes evoke picture books for children, masking its suggestions of wartime violence: Starbursts in red and yellow on and around bodies evoke open wounds and exploding shells. The 20 maquettes, all of which are on view, appear wonderfully handmade compared to the final stenciled pages, a fact noted by the artist himself, which led him to consider the possibilities of the cut-outs as independent works of art. During the decade before his d

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Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Midtown East Until Tuesday February 10 2015

"El Greco in New York"

Critics' pick

Romantics and Modernists alike treasured the old master El Greco (1541–1614) for the skewed perspectives and strangely distorted figures that fill his paintings—that is, when they weren’t blaming those aesthetic quirks on drugs, madness, or astigmatism. For the 400th anniversary of his death, three New York institutions have gathered their substantial holdings of the painter’s works—at 19 paintings, more than anywhere outside of the Prado in Madrid!—in two concise exhibitions. While “El Greco at the Frick Collection” comprises three canvases, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “El Greco in New York” features contributions from the Hispanic Society of America, as well as its own collection. The larger Met show allows us to trace the artist’s trajectory. Born Domenikos Theotokopoulos in Crete, then a Venetian possession, El Greco painted Byzantine icons before leaving to study in Italy. The early Christ Healing the Blind, ca. 1570, a fairly typical late-Renaissance religious scene, shows the influence of his artistic training in Venice in its impressive if imperfect approximation of the modes of artists such as Veronese. In 1577, El Greco moved permanently to Spain. Subsequent devotional pictures show the artist’s increasing mastery of Renaissance idiom. Christ Carrying the Cross, ca. 1580–85 (watery-eyed, but with a perfect manicure), and The Holy Family, ca. 1585 (the Madonna charming, with an up-do and a gauzy mantilla; the nursing baby Jesus beady-eyed, with an oddly shaped h

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Until Sunday February 1 2015

The Book of Mormon

Critics' pick

If theater is your religion and the Broadway musical your sect, you've been woefully faith-challenged of late. Venturesome, boundary-pushing works such as Spring Awakening, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson and Next to Normal closed too soon. American Idiot was shamefully ignored at the Tonys and will be gone in three weeks. Meanwhile, that airborne infection Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark dominates headlines and rakes in millions, without even opening. Celebrities and corporate brands sell poor material, innovation gets shown the door, and crap floats to the top. It's enough to turn you heretic, to sing along with The Book of Mormon's Ugandan villagers: "Fuck you God in the ass, mouth and cunt-a, fuck you in the eye." Such deeply penetrating lyrics offer a smidgen of the manifold scato-theological joys to be had at this viciously hilarious treat crafted by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, of South Park fame, and composer-lyricist Robert Lopez, who cowrote Avenue Q. As you laugh your head off at perky Latter-day Saints tap-dancing while fiercely repressing gay tendencies deep in the African bush, you will be transported back ten years, when The Producers and Urinetown resurrected American musical comedy, imbuing time-tested conventions with metatheatrical irreverence and a healthy dose of bad-taste humor. Brimming with cheerful obscenity, sharp satire and catchy tunes, The Book of Mormon is a sick mystic revelation, the most exuberantly entertaining Broadway musical in years. The high q

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Eugene O'Neill Theatre, Midtown West Tuesday January 27 2015 - Thursday December 31 2015

The Woodsman

Critics' pick

The Woodman: Theater review by Raven Snook Even before writer, codirector, set- and puppet-designer star James Ortiz asks the audience to “imagine” in a brief prologue, we’ve already been thrust into a dark corner of Oz, where gnarled branches loom and unsettling noises signal danger. Strangemen & Co.’s immersive and practically wordless adaptation of the writings of L. Frank Baum uses low-tech stagecraft like evocative Bunraku puppets (the wicked witch is chilling), haunting vocal sound effects and a lone violinist to tell the backstory of Dorothy’s cherished Tin Man (Ortiz), once a mortal axman who sacrificed an arm and a leg and a whole lot more in the name of love. Emotions are communicated through simple gestures, grunts and glances, not one wasted. Touching on mortality, futility and fate, The Woodsman is a grown-up fairy tale that proves happiness is a worthwhile goal, even if it doesn’t last ever after.—Raven Snook The Woodsman. 59E59 (see Off Broadway). By James Ortiz. Based on the writings of L. Frank Baum. Directed by Ortiz and Claire Karpen. With ensemble cast. Running time: 1hr. No intermission.

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59E59 Theaters, Midtown East Tuesday January 27 2015 - Sunday February 22 2015

Nutcracker Rouge

Critics' pick

[Note: The review below is from a previous run of Nutcracker Rouge. The revived production is at XIV, Company XIV's new home in the East Village, and the current cast does not include Marisol Cabrera and Jeff Takacs.) Nutcracker Rouge. Minetta Lane Theatre (see Off Broadway). Directed and choreographed by Austin McCormick. With ensemble cast. Running time: 1hr 50mins. One intermission. Nutcracker Rouge: In brief Austin McCormick and his risqué neobaroque dance theater Company XIV present a lavish erotic reimagining of a classic holiday tale (adapted by Jeff Takacs), complete with circus performers, operatic singers and partial nudity. Nutcracker Rouge: Theater review by David Cote Around this time of year, the word nutcracker conjures so much innocent wonder: Tchaikovsky’s beloved score, the dance of the sugarplum fairy, glitter pasties, stripper poles, comically large stuffed penises.… Oh, did I lose you there? Director-choreographer Austin McCormick has taken the Christmas staple and given it a NSFW spin. Nutcracker Rouge is the perfect hot date: a rated-R riff on the tale of Clara and an enchanted appliance—which may require batteries. Our wide-eyed heroine is now an adult named Marie Claire (Laura Careless, agog and breathing heavily), and the world she discovers is a wintry realm of half-naked dancers and acrobats, gyrating and performing physical stunts that send her into ecstasies of arousal. They get the audience riled up, too. Decked out in Zane Pihlstrom’s eye-po

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XIV, East Village Tuesday January 27 2015 - Saturday January 31 2015

Constellations

Critics' pick

Constellations: Theater review by Adam Feldman Jake Gyllenhaal and Ruth Wilson are the stars of Constellations, and as that implies, they must make themselves multiple. Inspired by quantum mechanics, Nick Payne’s captivating play, directed crisply by Michael Longhurst, explores the idea of parallel universes in a mosaic of scenes that often restart and branch off in new directions, skipping forward and backward in time. “Every decision you’ve ever and never made” creates a different reality, and the play shows us fragments of some of them. It puts narrative in a house of infinite shattered mirrors. Beekeeper Roland (Gyllenhaal) and cosmologist Marianne (Wilson) are on-again, off-again lovers: in some worlds on, in some worlds off. Their relationship and its challenges—infidelity, illness, death—vary in ways that sometimes reflect nuances of their behavior and sometimes stem from forces beyond their control (which may not be such different things). Informed by authors like Jorge Luis Borges and Caryl Churchill, Constellations is smart but not dry; its focus is on the personal and emotional, and Gyllenhaal and Wilson reboot themselves convincingly at every stutter and turn. They’re wonderfully multiversatile.—Adam Feldman Constellations. Samuel J. Friedman Theatre (see Broadway). By Nick Payne. Directed by Michael Longhurst. With Jake Gyllenhaal, Ruth Wilson. Running time: 1hr 5mins. No intermission. Follow Adam Feldman on Twitter: @FeldmanAdam

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Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, Midtown West Tuesday January 27 2015 - Sunday March 15 2015

Sam Falls, "Light Over Time"

Critics' pick

A process-oriented Los Angeles artist who works in a variety of media, Sam Falls has transformed Downtown Brooklyn’s MetroTech Commons into a playground for his interactive art. Exploring the passage of time through light and color, Falls displays several sculptural works that are activated by the viewer and will physically alter over time. His Untitled (Thermochromic bench), for example, changes color due to heat generated by sitters or the intensity of sunlight. A maze has been painted with multicolored layers of powder-coated aluminum; one side has protective UV coating while the other doesn’t, so that the piece will partially fade from exposure. But as it does, another layer of paint will eventually emerge and regenerate the original color. A set of teeter-totters feature geometric forms that collect rainwater, thus changing the distribution of weight. A giant wind chime is too big for an ordinary breeze to move it, so visitors do the job instead by pushing the chimes around. A more solitary experience is provided by a pair of white, aluminum shelters with tiny entrances and stained-glass skylights. The ambience within each of these “light rooms,” as the artist calls them, will change with the weather. Playful and thought-provoking, these laboratories of fun seek to engage the curious child inside all of us.—Paul Laster

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Public Art Fund at MetroTech Center Commons, Downtown Until Friday May 29 2015 Free

Sleep No More

Critics' pick

To untimely rip and paraphrase a line from Macbeth: Our eyes are made the fools of the other senses, or else worth all the rest. A multitude of searing sights crowd the spectator's gaze at the bedazzling and uncanny theater installation Sleep No More. Your sense of space and depth---already compromised by the half mask that audience members must don---is further blurred as you wend through more than 90 discrete spaces, ranging from a cloistral chapel to a vast ballroom floor. Directors Felix Barrett and Maxine Doyle, of the U.K. troupe Punchdrunk, have orchestrated a true astonishment, turning six warehouse floors and approximately 100,000 square feet into a purgatorial maze that blends images from the Scottish play with ones derived from Hitchcock movies—all liberally doused in a distinctly Stanley Kubrick eau de dislocated menace. An experiential, Choose Your Own Adventure project such as this depends on the pluck and instincts of the spectator. You can follow the mute dancers from one floor to the next, or wander aimlessly through empty spaces. I chose the latter, discovering a room lined with empty hospital beds; a leafless wood in which a nurse inside a thatched cottage nervously checks her pocket watch; an office full of apothecary vials and powders; and the ballroom, forested with pine trees screwed to rolling platforms (that would be Birnam Wood). A Shakespearean can walk about checking off visual allusions to the classic tragedy; the less lettered can just revel in t

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McKittrick Hotel, Chelsea Until Thursday December 31 2015

"The Butterfly Conservatory: Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter"

Critics' pick

Temperatures climb to a balmy 80 degrees in the 1,200-square-foot vivarium, returning for its 16th year. The 500 specimens flying around include monarchs, zebra longwings and iridescent blue morpho butterflies.

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American Museum of Natural History, Upper West Side Until Monday May 25 2015

"Fetching Blemish"

Critics' pick

Following modern art's proud tradition of making the beastly beautiful, this show offers a top-notch roster of contemporary artists, whose works—portraits mostly—make references to defects, deformities, blemishes and just plain old butt-ugliness. Wolfgang, Nicole Eisenman and Amy Sedaris (!) are among the contributors.

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Invisible-Exports, Chinatown & Little Italy Wednesday January 28 2015 - Saturday February 14 2015 Free

Sam Falls, "Light Over Time"

Critics' pick

A process-oriented Los Angeles artist who works in a variety of media, Sam Falls has transformed Downtown Brooklyn’s MetroTech Commons into a playground for his interactive art. Exploring the passage of time through light and color, Falls displays several sculptural works that are activated by the viewer and will physically alter over time. His Untitled (Thermochromic bench), for example, changes color due to heat generated by sitters or the intensity of sunlight. A maze has been painted with multicolored layers of powder-coated aluminum; one side has protective UV coating while the other doesn’t, so that the piece will partially fade from exposure. But as it does, another layer of paint will eventually emerge and regenerate the original color. A set of teeter-totters feature geometric forms that collect rainwater, thus changing the distribution of weight. A giant wind chime is too big for an ordinary breeze to move it, so visitors do the job instead by pushing the chimes around. A more solitary experience is provided by a pair of white, aluminum shelters with tiny entrances and stained-glass skylights. The ambience within each of these “light rooms,” as the artist calls them, will change with the weather. Playful and thought-provoking, these laboratories of fun seek to engage the curious child inside all of us.—Paul Laster

Read more
Public Art Fund at MetroTech Center Commons, Downtown Until Friday May 29 2015 Free

"Fetching Blemish"

Critics' pick

Following modern art's proud tradition of making the beastly beautiful, this show offers a top-notch roster of contemporary artists, whose works—portraits mostly—make references to defects, deformities, blemishes and just plain old butt-ugliness. Wolfgang, Nicole Eisenman and Amy Sedaris (!) are among the contributors.

Read more
Invisible-Exports, Chinatown & Little Italy Wednesday January 28 2015 - Saturday February 14 2015 Free

Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park Rink

Critics' pick

Bryant Park’s 17,000-square-foot outdoor rink is free and open late. Don’t get too excited—the admission may be gratis, but you’ll have to shell out $19 to rent skates (or BYO). Still, it’s a veritable winter wonderland: After your time on the ice, warm up at spacious rinkside restaurant Celsius. If you want to practice your lutzes and axels with ample spinning room, try visiting during off-peak hours. Through Mar 1. RECOMMENDED: More rinks for ice skating in NYC

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Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park, Midtown West Until Sunday March 1 2015 Free

Comedy at the Knitting Factory

Critics' pick

The smooth and delightfully understated Hannibal Buress—who fans will recognize as Broad City's Lincoln—introduces fellow stand-ups.

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Knitting Factory, Williamsburg Sunday February 1 2015 - Sunday December 27 2015 Free

Whiplash

Critics' pick

This wildly popular show is known for its surprise special guests—comics like Chris Rock, David Cross and others have appeared.

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Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, Chelsea Tuesday January 27 2015 - Tuesday December 29 2015 Free

Agustin Fernandez

Critics' pick

Algus has committed himself to showing forgotten or underappreciated artists, and Fernandez (1928–2006) is no exception. A Cuban artist who sojourned in New York, Paris and San Juan, Puerto Rico, he created paintings and drawings in a style mixing abstraction and Surrealism, with nonobjective forms rendered in an illusionistic manner. The result recalls the sort of ’50s sci-fi paperback illustrations that owed a heavy debt to Yves Tanguy. His work was engrossingly weird enough to attract the attention of director Brian De Palma, who featured one of Fernandez's pieces in his creepy classic Dressed to Kill.

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Mitchell Algus Gallery, Lower East Side Until Sunday March 1 2015 Free

Kenny Rivero, "I Can Love You Better"

Critics' pick

Garbage accumulates like repressed urges in Kenny Rivero’s show “I Can Love You Better,” where paintings with assemblage elements are installed alongside sculptures made from discarded debris. The former blends collage, Surrealism and folk art into cartoonish compositions, while the latter piles shards of glass, bits of broken records and scraps of paint into quasi-shamanistic objects. In both, art history is treated like a trash can to be picked through. Rivero, a Yale MFA graduate, grew up on the mean streets of Washington Heights in the 1980s, and memories of life there provide a theater where psychologically charged narratives play out. In three large paintings, It Happened on the Corner, El Pique and The Fire Next Time (all from 2014), confrontations, beatings and fires dissipate into pictorial snippets. Sidewalks are transformed into sacrificial altars, slabs on which figures are dismembered. But Rivero also employs a comic touch that blunts the impact of his images. He mixes body parts, architectural fragments, letters and numbers to create a playful confusion, complicating our relationship to urban brutality. Evocations of violence within the aesthetic realm are nothing new; they informed the figurative mutations of early modern art. But Rivero understands that actual assault isn’t symbolic or a mere transgression of someone’s space: It can leave wounds that are mortal. Rivero links the shedding of blood on the pavement to the smearing of paint on canvas and in doing

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Shin Gallery, Lower East Side Wednesday January 28 2015 - Saturday February 28 2015 Free

Entang Wiharso

Critics' pick

An Indonesian artist who splits his time between his homeland and Rhode Island, Entang Wiharso explores social, cultural and political issues in a variety of mediums. Since 1995, Wiharso has exhibited his work internationally, which has cropped up with greater frequency in the last several years at such prestigious events as the 2013 Venice Biennale. For his first solo show in New York, Wiharso presents a solid selection of figurative paintings, sculptures and metal reliefs, all blurring boundaries between expressionism, surrealism and traditional storytelling. One large painting from 2014, Double Protection: Invisible Threat, depicts a man and woman coupling at the center of a nightmarish whirl of levitating bodies, severed heads and machinery with tubes snaking out of them, suggesting some sort of medical equipment. His massive 2013 aluminum relief, My Heart Is Bigger than You Think, connects contorted figures, weapons and word balloons (with texts like your brain is very delicious) into a modern-day version of Hieronymus Bosch’s hellish 16th-century masterpiece, The Garden of Earthly Delights. While these works recall the oppression that Wiharso’s family suffered while the artist was growing up in Jakarta during the regime of former Indonesian strongman Suharto, his life-size sculpture from 2014, Inheritance, offers a different vision. A family portrait, it shows Wiharso with his American wife and child around a table, which is surmounted by a gigantic carp. Magical but th

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Marc Straus Gallery, Lower East Side Wednesday January 28 2015 - Sunday February 8 2015 Free

Nolan Simon, "Portraits"

Critics' pick

Simon's off-center paintings would have fit right in with MoMA's "Forever Now" show. They employ a light, ironic touch to depict random images—faces, cute animals, boats—in a series of realistic watercolors on canvas. Resembling stock photographs or commercial illustrations, these pictures are sometimes ganged together on a single canvas to enhance their weird sense of disconnection. Simon edges them with strips of trompe l'oeil masking tape, as if to suggest that they're fastened to a studio wall. But they could just as easily represent the result of a Google image search and the impermanence of the Internet age.

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47 Canal, Chinatown & Little Italy Wednesday January 28 2015 - Sunday February 15 2015 Free

Frantic!

Critics' pick

The Stand's free weekly show, hosted by Aaron Berg, presents a rotating lineup of the club's regulars each Monday.

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The Stand, Gramercy & Flatiron Until Monday December 28 2015 Free

Taken 3

The stakes are higher, the LA locations are nicely photographed and, best of all, there’s an actual plot, with twists and everything.

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Now Showing

Predestination

Ethan Hawke stars in a goofily fatalistic time-travel thriller so busy chasing its own tail that it loses sight of everything else.

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Human Capital

Just when you thought Italian cinema was on a roll, it comes under the malign influence of Paul Haggis’s Crash.

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Unbroken

Angelina Jolie’s old-school war drama gets so much right—but still somehow fails to get under its subject's skin.

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Now Showing

Into the Woods

What’s in the woods? A-listers dressed like Game of Thrones extras, belting out show tunes. Sondheim's darkness makes it through.

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Now Showing

The Brain Cloud

Critics' pick

Dennis Lichtman, of the lively New Orleans–style jazz band the Cangelosi Cards, leads a highly talented group of musicians into energetic Western-swing territory. A mainstay at Barbès and several other local haunts, the Cloud is one of the city's most dependably charming retro acts.

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Barbès, Park Slope Until Monday February 23 2015

Steve Earle

Critics' pick

A true American original from deep in the heart of Virginia, Steve Earle has made his mark as a righteous roots troubadour, author, actor (that was him playing Walon, Bubbles's N.A. sponsor in The Wire) and political activist. Here, Earle gigs as part of his annual winter residency at the Winery.

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City Winery, Soho Monday January 26 2015

Zola Jesus

Critics' pick

The brand of synth-pop that opera-trained vocalist and songwriter Nika Roza Danilova makes as Zola Jesus is as monumental as it is ethereal. She’s stated before that she wants to be No. 1 on the Billboard chart, and anyone who catches her cosmic set live might agree that the goal isn't totally out of reach. Here, Danilova's touting a sparkling new album, Taiga, her fifth full-length and first for the Mute label. Singer-songwriter and former Dirty Projectors member Angel Deradoorian, whose solo work we dig, opens tonight, while menacing noise-meets-postpunk duo UNIFORM sets the stage Jan 26.

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Saint Vitus, Greenpoint Monday January 26 2015

The Deafening + Station

Critics' pick

Actor-singer Lauren Worsham, a recent Tony nominee for A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder, and her husband, downtown composer Kyle Jarrow, team up for a high-energy (and highly theatrical) night of indie-rock fun. In the Deafening, Tony winner Lena Hall (currently in Hedwig and the Angry Inch) fronts a '70s-style punk group.

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Highline Ballroom, Chelsea Monday January 26 2015

Action Bronson

Critics' pick

Nasal-voiced, 315-pound Albanian-American phenom Action Bronson is steeped in New York hip-hop culture in a way that few are. Apparently the Queens native has also ripped a few pages from the pro-wrestling handbook, once body-slamming a fan who jumped onstage uninvited. Expect Bronson to come out swinging, getting the faithful amped for his major-label debut, Mr. Wonderful, due in March.

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B.B. King Blues Club & Grill, Midtown West Monday January 26 2015

Years & Years

Critics' pick

This London electro-pop trio got quite the bump a month ago when the BBC announced them as the winner of its Sound of 2015 award (a distinction earned the previous two years by Sam Smith and Haim). If you like your pop music shimmery and cleanly produced with a thudding electronic pulse, we’d advise you have a listen sooner than later.

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Le Poisson Rouge, Greenwich Village Until Tuesday January 27 2015

Marty Thomas Presents Diva

Critics' pick

Singer and human spangle Marty Thomas (Xanadu) hosts this weekly showcase for big-voiced girl singers who perform show tunes as well as pop gems.

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Monday January 26 2015 Free

Reel Big Fish + Less than Jake + Authority Zero

Critics' pick

Orange County ska band Reel Big Fish has been packing rooms for close to two decades. On its latest holiday EP, Happy Skalidays, the group characteristically melds peppy rhythms with lyrics so unseasonably dark you can't help but laugh uncomfortably…and skank, skank your face off. Supporting are fellow '90s ska vets Less than Jake and Authority Zero.

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Best Buy Theater, Midtown West Tuesday January 27 2015

Bettye LaVette

Critics' pick

In her riveting previous sets at the Carlyle, loved and lauded veteran soulstress Bettye LaVette has let her soul voice soar like a phoenix shaking its ash. Now she returns to wrap her gloriously ravaged tonsils around songs by Bob Dylan, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and more.

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Café Carlyle (in the Carlyle Hotel), Upper East Side Tuesday January 27 2015 - Saturday February 7 2015

Jim Campilongo

Critics' pick

Every Tuesday, versatile twang-rock guitarist Jim Campilongo, a regular at the Living Room's old LES location, furnishes soulful grooves, stinging licks and friendly vibes with help from a revolving cast of collaborators in the club's new Williamsburg digs.

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Tuesday January 27 2015

"Matters of Pattern"

Repeating motifs, paradigms, archetypes and the like unite the works in this classy show, which features a stellar cast of artists that includes Louise Bourgeois, Mike Kelley, Cindy Sherman and Christopher Wool.

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Skarstedt Gallery Tuesday January 27 2015 - Saturday February 21 2015 Free

Vera Lutter

Critics' pick

Views of New York, including such iconic landmarks as the Chrysler and Empire State Buildings, are the subjects of this German photographer's latest show. As usual, the works have been created using her trademark technique: Transforming an empty shipping container (or room) into a gigantic camera obscura. The results are equally huge, comprising negative images with a nightmarish, Twilight Zone vibe.

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Gagosian Shop Thursday January 29 2015 - Saturday March 7 2015 Free

Outsider Art Fair 2015

Critics' pick

If your tastes in art range from folky and visionary to surreal and paranoid, head over to the annual fair devoted to self-taught artists, where you'll find all of that and more. On tap are works presented by 50 international galleries from 27 cities representing 8 countries—including painting, sculpture, drawing, mixed-media and photography. Also on view: A special exhibition spotlighting five artists (Melvin Way, Emery Blagdon, Adolf Wölfli, Mark Lombardi and the Philadelphia Wireman) curated by art dealer Jay Gorney and artist, writer and Time Out contributor Anne Doran.

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Center 548 Thursday January 29 2015 - Sunday February 1 2015

Djordje Ozbolt, "More paintings about poets and food"

Critics' pick

Born in Belgrade (while it was still in Yugoslavia), Ozbolt has called London home since the 1990s. Since then, he's established a reputation for creating paintings and sculpture featuring generous helpings of the bizarre and macabre. His work is a surreal stew of styles (both Western and not), brimming art-historical and pop-cultural references, as well as his takes on traditional genres such as landscape, portraiture and still life. All of it is occasionally spiced with passages of abstraction. The results are apiece with the contemporary vogue for mix-and-match painting, but Ozbolt's panache and technical skills set him apart. An allegorist of his own imagination, Ozbolt knows how to grab your attention.

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Hauser & Wirth New York Tuesday January 27 2015 - Saturday February 21 2015 Free

Christopher Knowles

Critics' pick

On view are large versions of Knowles's "typings" series of drawings done on a typewriter, including pictograms that form progressions of the letter C (for Christopher). They remain the best-known work by this autistic poet and artist who provided the libretto for Philip Glass and Robert Wilson’s 1976 avant-garde opera, Einstein on the Beach.

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Gavin Brown's Enterprise Thursday January 29 2015 - Sunday February 22 2015 Free

Comments

4 comments
Beatrice B
Beatrice B

Have to see Queen. Lambert is no impersonator! I saw them in Chicago and again in Vegas, now MSG. This show deserves a 4 star !!! That if you like great music and a front man with an amazing voice and commands the stage. Its like hearing Queen for the first time . Go see this show, if you can get seats !

Joyce W
Joyce W

Try this tasty experience in Chinatown tomorrow.  What a great way to do lunch!


We're going crazy for 4th of July and getting started early. Join our NEW Chinatown highlights tour and get tickets for only $25. That's a full meal and 2 hrs. of interesting history tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. Just buy tickets on our site and use code CFTFB2014. Hurry up. You can also call 917-979-4833

Blair Y
Blair Y

how about the Spike Lee block party in Brooklyn...