The best things to do this week in NYC

Find the biggest and best events, activities and things to do in New York City this week, as chosen by Time Out's editors

Photograph: Erin Baiano
Stop Hitting Yourself

American Ballet Theatre 2015

Critics' pick

American Ballet Theatre returns to the Metropolitan Opera House for its 75th-anniversary season. The highlight is the New York premiere of Alexei Ratmansky's The Sleeping Beauty, with scenery and costumes by Richard Hudson, who based his designs on those of Léon Bakst. In addition to an assortment of full-lengths—Othello, Swan Lake, Giselle, Romeo and Juliet and Cinderella—the run highlights historic company repertory, including Michel Fokine's Les Sylphides, George Balanchine's Theme and Variations, and Antony Tudor's Pillar of Fire and Jardin aux Lilas.

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Metropolitan Opera House (at Lincoln Center) Until Saturday July 4 2015

Ed Sheeran

Critics' pick

Ed Sheeran's stock has risen just a wee bit during the past few years—a couple of platinum albums here, a sprinkling of Grammy nominations there. Earlier this year, the ginger-mopped British folk-pop star played the Grammys with a no-big-deal assortment of players including John Mayer, Questlove and E-L-freakin'-O. We can't promise guests of that caliber here, but it wouldn't surprise us in the least if a few big names turn up to help Sheeran support his strummy 2014 opus, X.

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Forest Hills Tennis Stadium Until Sunday May 31 2015

Pixies + John Grant

Critics' pick

Last year pioneering alt-rockers Pixies released Indie Cindy, their first batch of new material in more than two decades. Neither Kim (Deal or Shattuck) is with the band anymore, so the lineup looks like this: Black Francis, David Lovering, Joey Santiago and Paz Lenchantin. You'll surely hear new tunes alongside ye olde classics.

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Beacon Theatre Thursday May 28 2015

Frida Kahlo, “Art, Garden, Life”

Critics' pick

Botanical subjects were a running theme throughout the work of Frida Kahlo. The art-historical icon maintained an ornate garden just outside her studio that inspired much of her art. That connection is explored here in this tribute to the artist, which includes a replica of her garden and a display of paintings related to it.

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The New York Botanical Garden Until Sunday November 1 2015

The Who

Critics' pick

The Who—that is, Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey, some other musicians and two very prominent ghosts—hits the road as part of the group's 50th-anniversary celebration, digging into some deep cuts for their supposedly final stadium trek. The core duo is bolstered by a more-than-able supporting cast, including Beatle progeny Zak Starkey and bass wizard Pino Palladino, recently heard on D'Angelo's masterful Black Messiah.

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Barclays Center Saturday May 30 2015 - Sunday October 25 2015

Ted Alexandro

Critics' pick

Alexandro’s cool, collected delivery and intelligent perspective have made him popular among a variety of audiences; we love him too. He’s had two specials on Comedy Central and appears regularly on the late-night-talk-show circuit.

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The Creek and the Cave Until Saturday May 30 2015 Free

World Science Festival

Critics' pick

This fun five-day affair combines scientific innovation with cutting-edge arts and culture. Hear talks on quantum physics and the concept of the term genius, and enter the NASA Orbit Pavilion. At the free Space Exploration event at Pier 86 on May 27, enjoy hands-on, NASA-guided activities. For more info, visit worldsciencefestival.com.

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Various locations Until Sunday May 31 2015

Shakespeare in the Park

8pm. Delacorte Theater, Central Park at 81st St. As it did last summer, the Public Theatre is running two plays in repertory at the Delacorte. The grown-up fairy tale All’s Well That Ends Well, which follows resourceful Helena’s gambit to win the heart of snooty Count Bertram, is probably more kid-appropriate than Measure for Measure, which might be too raunchy and Machiavellian for children weaned on Elmo and Abby Cadabby. Ages 10 and up.

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Delacorte Theater Until Sunday August 23 2015 Free

Hudson Mohawke

Critics' pick

Aside from crafting his own dynamic and emotive solo tunes, Glasgow producer Hudson Mohawke a.k.a. Ross Birchard garnered a fair bit of recognition with TNGHT, his booming trap project with Montreal beatsmith Lunice, not to mention his work producing for Kanye West and Drake. The young Scot plays here behind the second release under his own (stage) name, Lantern.

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Irving Plaza Thursday May 28 2015

Shwick Market

Critics' pick

This part indoor, part alfresco market hosts more than 100 vendors at its Bushwick location—and judging by the list of "makers," it’s worth the trek if you’re coming from across the bridge. Shop products from local artists, like photography from The BQE and hip wares by Funk and Grace, as well as artisanal foods like MixedMade’s spicy honey. This part of Brooklyn is known as New York’s most maker-y ’hood, so you know the spread is gonna be impressive.

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Shwick Market Saturday May 30 2015 - Sunday December 27 2015 Free

Adult Beginners

Kroll is Jake, a rich-dick entrepreneur who, after his Google Glass–like wearable fails to launch, becomes a penniless pariah. He retreats to his childhood home on Long Island and engages in catty rebonding with his sister, Justine (Byrne), while also taking awkward care of her child. It soars whenever it sticks to lived-in sibling banter. Still, you’ll wish the movie didn’t resort to metaphorical swimming lessons and big office speech like a zillion lesser efforts already have.

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Avengers: Age of Ultron

Joss Whedon’s first Avengers movie was the epic finale to Marvel’s cinematic “Phase One,” herding all the franchise’s disparate elements in a rousing, rewarding whole. Age of Ultron, though, has a definite mid-season feel to it, telling a compelling but never game-changing story while laying the foundations for the epic, two-part Infinity War due in 2018.  It may be piled with MacGuffins, magic crystals, red-skinned demigods and psychic asides, but at the heart of Ultron is a simple, even derivative plot about overweening ambition and technology run amok.

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Clouds of Sils Maria

Combining the acute professional paranoia of All About Eve with the existential crisis of Persona, this heady and brilliant psychodrama stars Binoche as Maria Enders, a fading star who’s agreed to be in a revival of the play that made her famous as a young ingenue. Retreating to the Swiss Alps with her unfailingly honest assistant (Stewart, a deadpan revelation), Maria begins a rehearsal process that will force her to grapple with the presentness of her past.

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Dior and I

Fashionistas will love this fly-on-the-wall doc about eight make-or-break weeks at the house of Dior, filmed in 2012 as newly appointed creative director Raf Simons puts together his first haute couture collection against the clock. The Belgian was hired in the toxic wake of John Galliano, terminated for unleashing an anti-Semitic rant filmed on a cell phone. Couture is as elitist as fashion gets, bought by a few 100 super wealthy women who don’t blink at spending the equivalent of a year’s rent on a few new-season must-haves. (Prices typically start at $30,000.) The pressure for Simons to succeed in the ultrafeminine world of Dior is intense.

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Now Showing

Ex Machina

Screenwriter Garland’s directorial debut takes place at the moment that artificial intelligence might be about to doom the human race. It’s the tale of Caleb (Gleeson), an ace computer programmer, and his boss’s new invention: Ava, a robot whose LEDs combine with the lithe features of actor Vikander. Her presence is spellbinding, but an obvious twist drains much of the credibility from a story with promise.

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Now Showing

Far From the Madding Crowd

Burning with understated passion and a fine central performance from Carey Mulligan, Thomas Hardy’s romantic classic comes to life in an adaptation that’s far from stodgy. 

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Now Showing

Far From Men

French director David Oelhoffen’s Far From Men—an adaptation of a short story, The Guest, by French-Algerian philosopher Albert Camus—is an intelligent, slow-burning western with an atmospheric score by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis, and an outstanding performance by Viggo Mortensen.

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Felix and Meira

Félix (Dubreuil) is an agnostic French Canadian loner; soft-spoken Meira (Yaron) is an Orthodox Jew who’s failed her traditional husband by bearing him only one child. A somber romance that’s as much about the cultural confluence of city life as it is about the unlikely couple who manage
to find each other in it, the film captures the dislocating loneliness of Lost in Translation without leaving its characters’ native Montreal.

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Now Showing

Forbidden Games

A film about children that is most definitely not a children’s film, this enduring minor classic follows an orphaned girl through WWII as she wanders onto a rustic farm in the countryside and makes friends with a local boy. The pair obsessively busy themselves building a cemetery for all the little things the war has left in its wake, creating a bubble and making their own sense of the horror that brought them together.

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Furious 7

Released in the wake of star Paul Walker’s untimely death in a car wreck, Furious 7 was always going to lay it on thick with the nostalgic montages and hug-it-out “I’m gonna miss you, dog” macho bonding. But the seventh installment of this auto-porn series—this time, our heroes are being chased around the world by a homicidal Statham—isn’t quite as blood-pumping as it ought to be, largely due to director James Wan’s decision to shoot every car sequence in jittery close-up.

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Michael Heizer, “Altars”

Critics' pick

Heizer pauses from working on his monumental sculptures in the Nevada desert, hopping off his bulldozer long enough to present vintage Minimalist paintings from the 60s and ’70s, as well as new sculptures meant for indoors.

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Gagosian Gallery Until Thursday July 2 2015 Free

Lee Quiñones

Critics' pick

Street art as we know it would be unimaginable without the contributions of Quiñones and other giants of graffiti's Golden Age. He helped to create the template for careers ranging from Keith Haring to Banksy. This pop-up show brings together little-seen mural studies from the ’70s and his more recent abstract paintings.

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Nicole Klagsbrun Until Sunday June 7 2015 Free

Richard Serra, Equal

Critics' pick

On view is a major new installation in forged, weatherproof steel by the art world’s god of heavy metal. The piece consists of four blunt columns arranged in a square, with each column formed by two massive blocks of steel stacked one on top of the other.  Brutalist and chthonic, Equal is wholly consistent with the uncompromising work we've come to expect from Serra. 

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David Zwirner Until Friday July 24 2015 Free

“David Salle: New Paintings”

Critics' pick

Salle’s latest paintings pick up from where an earlier 1993 series left off, with collagelike compositions of ads and other pop-cultural imagery—an approach heavily indebted, now as then, to James Rosenquist.

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Skarstedt Gallery Until Saturday June 27 2015 Free

Sigmar Polke, “Silver Paintings”

Critics' pick

Germany’s consummate pop prankster is best known for joining forces with Gerhard Richter to create Capitalist Realism, but as his 2014 MoMA survey amply demonstrated, that was but a tip of the iceberg. His work wandered all over the place, often into strange experiments involving toxic materials. The abstract works here were created using various solutions of silver (silver bromide, silver sulfate and silver nitrate) painted on linen and sealed with varnish. The effects are weird, compelling, ghostly—in short, pure Polke.

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Michael Werner Until Saturday June 27 2015 Free

Comments

6 comments
Claire B
Claire B

Basque Cider House is this Sunday at Txikito! Michelin rated James Beard nominated Chefs prepare a Curated dinner highlighting Basque cultural appreciation through specially crafted Ciders and Art including projections and documentary film. Eder Montero, Alex Raij, Emily Lobsenz and Leah Rinaldi invited me to unique experience of a tradition. This Sunday, March 29th at 6, Totally worth sharing!

Mark W
Mark W

The BEST, and longest-running, Dueling Pianos show in NYC - SHAKE RATTLE & ROLL DUELING PIANOS - 10pm every Saturday night.  All request rock n roll party.  Part concert, part cabaret, part comedy - all fun!


The Cellar @ 22 Warren St. NYC 10007

www.ShakeRattleRollPianos.com for tix and info!

Beatrice B
Beatrice B

Have to see Queen. Lambert is no impersonator! I saw them in Chicago and again in Vegas, now MSG. This show deserves a 4 star !!! That if you like great music and a front man with an amazing voice and commands the stage. Its like hearing Queen for the first time . Go see this show, if you can get seats !

Blair Y
Blair Y

how about the Spike Lee block party in Brooklyn...