Hotels

The best family-friendly hotels in Lisbon

Looking for a place to stay that will make the whole bunch happy? Look no further – here are the best family-friendly hotels in Lisbon


By Time Out Lisbon editors

Posted: Friday March 3 2017


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Lisbon's best family-friendly hotels offer the perfect getaway to the city. From all the activities you can do outdoors to all the beaches you have near the city, Lisbon is a magical playground for children. If you’re planning a family break to the city make sure you choose a hotel that knows how to make your stay really special. There are hotels that will bring milk and cookies to your little ones beds before they go to sleep or that will take care of them while you go to a fancy dinner. Below are the best family-friendly hotels in Lisbon – they’ll soon make you wish you were six again!

Recommended: The best things to do in Lisbon

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Hotels, Luxury hotels

InterContinental Lisbon

icon-location-pin São Sebastião
The 30-year-old building underwent a recent facelift, giving Intercontinental its glow back. The decoration is both light and cosy and rooms have all the technology the 21st century requires – wi-fi is available everywhere. The Akla restaurant is famous for its steak tartar – among the city's best – and its exemplary wine cellar. Its vintage “azulejo” ceramic wall tiles alone will make a visit worthwhile. If you take one of the suites, you can have longer breakfast hours and room delivery. The hotel has a gym and private parking.
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Hotels

Pousada de Lisboa

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior
The Portuguese word “pousada” usually means no-frills lodging for short stays. That is not what's on offer here. The newest addition to the Pestana Group family is the fulfilment an old promise to the city; some doubters thought Lisbon would never be a part of the Pousadas de Portugal roster. Last year it finally came to be, as this “Pousada” with a capital P moved into a Pombaline-style building in the Terreiro do Paço, which once housed Portugal's Interior Ministry. Inside you will find a cosmopolitan, luxurious hotel, one that proudly displays its commitment to Portuguese arts. Its corridors and salons have art niches with tapestries by Nadir Afonso and sculptures of St. Anthony. The building's original high ceilings and wooden floors have been preserved.
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Hotels

Martinhal Lisbon Chiado Family Suites

icon-location-pin Chiado
Hidden in a narrow Chiado street, it is located smack in the middle of Lisbon's nightlife and the historic centre. It is but a very short (downwards) walk to TimeOut Mercado da Ribeira, where you can find the city's top chefs' restaurants. It is thus a great starting point for discovering Lisbon without making detailed plans, even if your family came along. With Martinhal, the adults can go out, have fun and enjoy Lisbon in peace while the kids are left in charge of the hotel staff.
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Hotels

Corinthia Hotel Lisbon

icon-location-pin Campolide
The Corinthia's 518 rooms are sober and functional. They aim to please both business clients (full amenities are offered, including free wi-fi) and leisure travellers. The latter should get out of their room and explore the hotel's common areas. The Longevity Spa has hydrotherapy, a beauty and wellness centre and a panoramic gym; it is one of Lisbon's largest and best. A haven of quiet and comfort, Corinthia also has an excellent, twofold gastronomic offer. There's the traditional restaurant O Típico and the international cuisine of Sete Colinas. On Fridays there is live music at the Terrace Lounge bar, from which you can see the entire Águas Livres Aqueduct.
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Hotels

Pestana CR7 Lisboa

icon-location-pin Baixa Pombalina
A day in the life of the world's best – this is the Pestana Group's proposal at the new CR7, the chain's second hotel (the first is located in Funchal, Madeira) inspired by Portugal's celebrated footballer and aimed at a millennial crowd. Interactive, modern and connected, Pestana CR7 brings to Lisbon a seductive offer: to have a glimpse at a day in the life of Ronaldo, and enjoy the same comforts and extravagances that the Real Madrid star expects to find away from home. This includes perks such as a suite equipped with a Playstation – Ronaldo himself says that wherever he is, there is always a game of FIFA and a pair of controllers around.
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Hotels, Luxury hotels

Hotel Mundial

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior
In the 1950s, tourism in Lisbon didn't go much beyond the city centre and castle areas. Staying in this hotel at the Martim Moniz square, a couple of minutes' walk from the Rossio, thus meant staying smack in the middle of the fun part of town, right next to all the typical food joints, the theatre houses and Lisbon's bohemian nightlife spots. More than half a century later, a lot has changed in the city, but Mundial's reputation remains intact. The square earned and then ditched a “rough” image, and has now become a fusion food market. As Lisbon grew, so did the Mundial, while keeping its old charm. The hotel remains a favourite of families, tour groups and business travellers.
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Hotels

Pestana Palace Lisboa

icon-location-pin Alcântara
Picture yourself in a hotel that was once the main residence of a 19th century nobleman, the Marquis of Valle Flôr, a well-travelled man of refined taste. After his death, the building was left abandoned for more than 60 years, until being purchased by the Pestana group – who saw a diamond in the rough in this Petit Trianon of sorts. But only in 2001, after being designated a national monument, did the building open to the public as the Pestana Palace. It became the crown jewel of this hotel corporation, and it is considered one of the world's best luxury hotels. Madonna, a former guest, can attest to that.
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Hotels

Altis Avenida Hotel

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior
The hotel is, inside and out, a worthy representative of late 1940s glamour. Its 70 rooms and suites, divided over six floors, are both kitschy and futuristic, with Art Déco features such as the golden, purple and wooden details, contrasting with the black and white contemporary decoration. The 16 Deluxe rooms have a balcony; all rooms have marble bathrooms and Egyptian cotton bed linens. Here's a tip – room 206 is the only one with a balcony in its bathroom. But if you really want the full retro-chic Altis experience, then ask for one of the (just two) suites.
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Hotels

Valverde Hotel

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
Behind its 19th century facade Valverde is a boutique hotel whose distinguishing features are its artistic side and its immaculate service. Let's start from the beginning. Right upon arrival you will notice how seriously the building's renovation works were taken. The hotel has a bold aesthetic that brings out its classic features. That might have resulted in a schizophrenic style but instead it became Valverde's calling card, a non-dull history lesson. The 25 rooms and suites vary in size and type – the building's original structure did not allow for any major alterations. However, even the smaller rooms (a little bigger than 20 square meters) make up for their size with large bathrooms including a shower and a tub.
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Hotels

Altis Belém Hotel & Spa

icon-location-pin Belém
Belém includes the city's most famous monuments, such as the Belém Tower, the Jerónimos Monastery and the Pastéis de Belém pastry shop (not, strictly speaking, a monument, but it might as well be). You would expect hotels to mushroom around here. But they don't, and so Altis Belém had space to grow undisturbed by competitors to become a luxury hotel with a Michelin restaurant. Modern on the inside and out, its trademark is the Tagus – it is very close to riverside. Within you will find a quasi-futurist setting unafraid of empty spaces and minimalist decoration, in a black and white scheme that only varies in theme rooms inspired by Portugal's former colonies.
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Hotels

Olissippo Lapa Palace

icon-location-pin Estrela/Lapa/Santos
Hidden among the mansions of four-surname-plus-two-hyphen-named families, this 19th century manor house is as close as it gets to a modern day royal palace. Its classical imperial style will have you constantly gaping even if you think you're immune to the charms of a wooden dresser, an elegant curtain or a crystal chandelier. The decoration and the landscape are different in each room (some face the Tagus, others the exotic garden). The palace suites have the largest four poster beds you will ever see, wherein two people can stretch diagonally and not touch each other. The gym with its heated swimming pool and the spa are great indoors options for a relaxed time, but on sunny days it's a sin not to enjoy the garden and the outer pool.
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Hotels

Hotel Tivoli Lisboa

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
For more than eight decades in business (the hotel was built in 1933), the Tivoli's group grew and expanded within and outside the city. Its Avenida da Liberdade firstborn remains one the city's classics. Lisbon is not New York but if you had to draw a comparison, you'd say the Tivoli is Lisbon's version of the Big Apple's Plaza when it comes to fame, recognition and location. The Avenida da Liberdade, with its designer shops and international brands such as Cartier, Gucci and Louis Vuitton is not far behind  Manhattan's 5th. In 2016, its Thai owners invested 15 million euros in a total makeover of the rooms and common areas. You don't want to mess with perfection, though: no changes were made to the top floor terrace, proud host of the Sky Bar, one of Lisbon's hippest rooftops, nor to the botanic garden with a swimming pool.
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©Hotel Avenida Palace
Hotels

Hotel Avenida Palace

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior
This Belle Époque style hotel opened for business in 1892, and has often been praised as one of Europe's finest and prettiest. It was designed by José Luís Monteiro, the same master builder who conceived the facade of the nearby Rossio train station. Avenida Palace precedes by many decades the big tourist boom. It survived the Portuguese republican revolution, the Spanish civil war and both world wars, while being a major venue for political intrigue and espionage – or so some say. Its 82 rooms and suites face Lisbon's centre. The bathrooms are marble, the decoration is Spartan.
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Hotels

EPIC SANA Lisboa Hotel

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real
At a time when Lisbon's hotel business turned towards smaller, more intimate boutique hotels, the SANA Group parked right next to the Amoreiras a five-star giant with a surprisingly warm and family-style customer care, as if to prove that size really doesn't matter. The 291 rooms and suites are a luxury  proposition. Their minimalist décor highlights their generous size and spaciousness, making their king-sized beds the centre of attentions. Bathrooms are also worthy of mention, with their huge showers and tubs, so large you will feel like soaking in a bath all day long and fall asleep (we're not saying that's what happened, but we're not saying it didn't either).
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Hotels

Hotel Heritage Avenida Liberdade

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
Miguel Câncio Martins, the same architect that designed the famous Buddha Bar in Paris or the Pacha in Marrakesh, created this stylish hotel from a Pombaline-style 18th century building. The original outline remains unchanged, with its cast-iron balconies, stonework and tile walls. But the makeover made it fresh-faced, urbane and cosmopolitan, mixing the young and the old – an alchemy that earned it international recognition as one of Portugal's most successful restoration projects. You will see why right on your way in, with an old apothecary counter converted into a tea station, and the mezzanine turned into a library. It is a small hotel, 41 rooms, with a range of amenities you wouldn't expect from a location merely six storeys tall.
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Hotels

Four Seasons Hotel Ritz Lisbon

icon-location-pin São Sebastião
Portuguese high society's golden age was about to come, but 1950s Lisbon was still behind its peers in terms of luxury accommodations. There were a couple of hotels with a good international reputation, but not much else. And then came the Ritz, in 1959. Its grand opening was a hot ticket, with more than two thousand guests and a French hotel's refinement in its decoration and service. The luxury remains and this five star hotel is still one of the city's most popular. “No” is a taboo word here; ask for anything and the hotel will get it for you. Designed by award-winning architect Pardal Monteiro, the building is a city landmark. 
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Hotels

Hotel Britania

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
Designed in 1940 by modernist architect Cassiano Branco, Hotel Britania remains genuine and true to itself, and that's what makes it so special. Ignoring the competition and thoroughly uninterested in adapting to 21st century trends, its calling card is simplicity – not everyone needs state of the art technology or contemporary furniture to feel home. Perennially voted as one of the hotels with the nicer staff, its team is devoted to turning every stay into a guided tour through the golden age of European architecture. There are 32 rooms (and a suite) decorated in grey and wooden tones, and they are both comfortable and spacious. Some of them have balconies and cork floors, but most have classic marble floors, the same material used in the lobby.
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Fotografia: Arlndo Camacho
Hotels

Sheraton Lisboa Hotel & Spa

icon-location-pin São Sebastião
The 91-metre tall giant hides within its walls one of the most effective staffs you will ever find (they even have a medical department). Its 369 rooms will make you want to move in. We don't even mean the ten executive suites, whose generous areas make them larger than many Lisbon apartments; the standard rooms are breathtaking enough in its style and luxury features, such as Bang & Olufsen LCD screens, marble bathrooms and delightful beds by Sheraton's exclusive brand, Sweet Sleeper. Only the Club Rooms include breakfast, free wi-fi and access to a panoramic lounge with a bar and light meals service, the place where we suspect VIPs go to dodge meetings. In other rooms, the buffet breakfast (you might as well call it lunch, considering the absurd amount of available hot and cold plates) costs 23€ and Internet access costs 15€ per 24 hours (there's free wi-fi in public areas).
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Hotels

Hotel Lisboa Plaza

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
The rooms are great, large and comfy, both classic and relaxed, but it's the rest of the Plaza that truly sings. The original decoration mixes the old and the new with a delightful zest: old furniture and designer pieces, brightly painted walls and marble rooms with armchairs and rocking chairs. Some traces remains of the 1950s, when the hotel opened for business as a meeting point for the artists that drew crowds to the nearby Parque Mayer. It has been managed ever since by the same family, who remained committed throughout the years to the hotel's informal and bohemian style.
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Hotels

Eurostars das Letras

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real
This luxury hotel in the back of the Avenida da Liberdade invites its guests to gather in lively soirées where great writers are remembered. Its 107 rooms got their names from Virginia Woolf, Stendhal, Shakespeare or Mark Twain; snippets of their work hover above the bedposts. Drop by the bar and say hi to Dickens and step inside the conference room to witness an unlikely meeting of Pessoa and Cervantes. All of it is surrounded by a modern atmosphere, with light cascading over design furniture and black marble floors suggesting the hotel's creative personality. Eurostar is unusual in its price – much lower than what you'd might expect in a five-star hotel. But that doesn't mean the staff is any less friendly or the array of services any narrower.
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Hotels

PortoBay Liberdade

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
Porto Bay Liberdade offers the best of both worlds: a five-star city hotel's luxury, the relaxation and friendliness of a vacation resort. The location, just a couple of minutes from the Avenida da Liberdade, is an added bonus for tourists: in fifteen minutes, you can get to the traditional shops of the city centre or the Chiado. The hotel's name is a bit deceiving. You'd assume it has something to do with Portugal's second city, but actually it comes from Porto Santo, in the Madeira islands, where this group already has 11 other properties. This is their first in Lisbon. The 98 rooms on offer are utilitarian rather than dazzling, but they all have a choice of pillows, a tiny detail that can make or break your hotel stay. To make up for the lack of a spectacular panorama there is a rooftop lounge bar and jacuzzi.
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Hotels

9 Hotel Mercy

icon-location-pin Chiado
The hotel has 47 rooms, some of them with a balcony or a patio, but the best view is from the sixth floor terrace, where you can see Lisbon all the way to the river, ideally with sunglasses on while holding a glass of wine. Downstairs, there is no restaurant but Le9 serves light meals; there is also room service. It is important however to notice that the bar does not specialize in food but in mixology: their original cocktail menu is infusion based – they have a great selection of teas. Breakfast is a neverending food festival, so you'd better pace yourself: homemade yogurt, detox juices, “nata” tarts, croissants, five varieties of bread, bacon and eggs are some of the offering. Free parking is available, and so is free wi-fi throughout the hotel.
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Hotels

Myriad by SANA Hotels

icon-location-pin Parque das Nações
Myriad SANA takes the most advantage of having the Tagus by its doorstep: the hotel is literally on top of the water, so there can be no better view of the river. The view is so great you might get seasick – there are rocking chairs by the room windows. The hotel is garishly decorated in tones of red, black and white, with mirrors everywhere. The 186 rooms are a bit more low-key in terms of colours, but the River Lounge Bar is a chromatic explosion. It has a Portuguese menu with a twist; in summer nights, enjoy going over it slowly on the outdoors tables overlooking the Tagus.The hotel's top floor is 143 metres high and holds the Sayana Wellness Spa, with an indoors panoramic pool, a gym, a hammam, a jacuzzi and a floatarium where you can experience zero gravity.
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Hotels

HF Fénix Music

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real
HF Fénix Music is not just a music-tribute hotel, it's a whole sensory experience. All 109 rooms have a theme, from rock to pop to classical music to fado, and every one is equipped with all you need to create you own private disco: Bluetooth sound systems, Internet access touchscreens and even dynamic, disco-style lighting. Music is everywhere: the front desk is drum set-shaped, the bar resembles a piano keyboard. On top of the building you will find a small oasis that will make you forget you're in the centre of Lisbon: a lounge terrace with a swimming pool and a bar with a broad view of the castle. The restaurant serves breakfast only – such a great establishment could do more. At the bar you can chat and have beer either at the counter or on the couch, everything lit as if on a dance floor.
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Hotels

Vila Galé Ópera

icon-location-pin Alcântara
Vila Galé Ópera has been operating for 15 years, but seems ageless. Maybe the Tagus breeze blows youth into it. This hotel has definitely not lost its sense purpose: located right next to the Lisbon Congress Centre, it draws a business rather than a leisure crowd, and therefore it commits itself to be the best possible host for business travellers. The hotel is also very welcoming for those travelling with children, since its 243 rooms come in different sizes, including family rooms. And because life is meaningless if you can't have some fun, beyond conference rooms there is also a health club with a gym, an indoors pool and a bar serving appetizers. There is also a restaurant with regional food tastings accompanied by fine Alentejo wines.
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Hotels

Hf Fenix Garden

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real
The 94 rooms have no theme but they come in different colours. The layouts are all similar, featuring fluffy, soft beds that ensure a good night's sleep. Common areas are surprisingly tasteful, with a look mixing vintage and classic designs. The bar is a good example of the hotel's neat aesthetic, with its dark rattan chairs, Portuguese “calçada” pavement, marble walls and long sofas. Just in case you are in the mood for taking a vacation from your vacation and spend a day in the hotel doing nothing, rooms have free wi-fi and sports channels. There is a babysitting service, for which reservations are required. There is no restaurant; the only meal served is breakfast; eat and move on.
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Hotels

Altis Grand Hotel

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real
The Altis Grand Hotel makeover was both silent and effective, and drew very little attention. It was a needed change at a time when competition and demand levels spiked, forcing veteran contenders to move into the 21st century. The Altis Grand Hotel renovated its (300) rooms, making them lighter and more comfortable, including new technology and large bathrooms. If you knew the “old” Altis, you will be amazed by the Spa, the renovation's masterpiece, with its swimming pool, Turkish baths, sauna e treatment rooms. The D. Fernando restaurant suggests Portuguese traditional cuisine, with a strong emphasis on fresh fish from Portugal's coastline. If you want a broader range of options, go up to the Campo de Ourique district and walk around until you find something that catches your fancy.
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Hotels

SANA Capitol Hotel

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real
SANA Capitol wants to be a home away from home that pampers businesspeople on them move with a little family-style comfort. Its 59 rooms come in neutral colours with modern furniture and designer lamps that provide an interesting light show. Black and yellow are prevalent in the bar and the lobby, the breakfast room has red leather sofas. The C Bar Food and Drinks Lounge serves drinks, cocktails, and light meals. There are good dining alternatives in the Avenida da Liberdade, five minutes away. If you are looking for more affordable places, walk a little longer down to the city centre and you will find a considerably larger number of restaurants for all price ranges.
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Hotels, Boutique hotels

Hotel Borges

icon-location-pin Chiado
Its 96 rooms have different moods and vibes, classic and modern, some traditional, others a bit extravagant, with fur blankets and velvet armchairs. If your room is in the front of the building, your view will be of the busy Largo do Chiado. You won't see far, but that's a small price to pay for staying in the centre of the centre. There is no restaurant in the premises, and no need for one either, considering how many dining options you have in the vicinities: you can dine fish at Sea Me, only five minutes away, or walk the same distance for a Neapolitan pizza at Mercantina. Breakfast is served buffet-style and there is a terrace with a bar to enjoy the sunny days.
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Hotels

Lisboa Prata Boutique Hotel

icon-location-pin Baixa Pombalina
The Lisboa Prata Boutique Hotel has 17th century tile panels and wainscots, ancient tapestries, and bits of archaeological ruins preserved behind glassed displays; but it also has design furniture and contemporary artworks. It's an original concept that perfectly brings together the new and the old. Its 25 rooms have windows and balconies facing the street, private bathrooms and free wi-fi. The hotel is in the middle of the Rua da Prata, so the obvious destination is downtown – but take our advice and have your (paid) breakfast at the hotel: cafes and pastry shops in nearby Rua Augusta try to pass off as traditional, but they're really tourist traps. Breakfast in bed is available for an extra fee.
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Hotels

Luxe Hotel By TURIM Hoteis

icon-location-pin Lisbon
The Luxe Hotel is not particularly outstanding in terms of quality or amenities, but it is located in a side street near the city's great melting pot, the Avenida Almirante Reis.   Unflashy, the Luxe Hotel has 50 classic rooms with a private bathroom, a lounge bar and a breakfast room with a long glass strip on the ceiling. The decoration is simple, modern and perfectly in line with the B&B type service. There is no swimming pool, no yard and no garden, but to make up for it you will be staying in Lisbon's future Soho, a neighbourhood where cultures from all corners of the world mix together. You will find Indian jewellers, Nepalese grocery stores, Chinese restaurants and even a fusion market with foods from all over the world at the Martim Moniz square.
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Hotels

Skyna Hotel Lisboa

icon-location-pin São Sebastião
This is the Angolan brand's first Portuguese hotel, but it will likely not be the last. The location was handpicked: one of Lisbon's traditional wealthy neighbourhoods, with an excellent service infrastructure and the Gulbenkian Museum (where one of the city's prettiest gardens is hidden) two minutes away on foot. The 105 rooms have no particularly thrilling features, but the restaurant is a welcome surprise: a charming and pleasant place with a kitchen open to the dining room and a menu traipsing between Portuguese classics and international cuisine. The bar is located in the top floor and has two terraces, one covered, the other one not.
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Hotels

Neya Lisboa Eco Hotel

icon-location-pin Lisbon
It's not like the building is made of recycled cardboard, but every material chosen for decorating it is of vegetable origin. The Neya also insists on passing an environmental message to its guests, warning them against unnecessary wastes of water or towels, and even about how much energy a simple charger left in the socket will drain. Serious stuff, but not preachy – it's about persuasion, not propaganda. The 76 rooms and suites are comfortable and sober, and come with Shiatsu massage pillows, for extra relaxation before giving in to a deep sleep. It is said that snorers will feel better after a night's sleep with these pillows. The hotel's ecofriendliness extends to the Viva Lisboa restaurant, whose Mediterranean menu is seasonal and locavore.
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Hotels

BessaHotel Liberdade

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
The hotel might look a bit conceited at first, but that self-confidence is justified. Its 113 rooms are simultaneously chic, vintage and practical (some of them have a balcony facing the street). Bathrooms are luxurious, pristinely white and they have an integrated Bluetooth sound system. Everything else is about living the good life. The hotel restaurant tries to innovate, with a contemporary menu with dashes of traditional cuisine to go along with a good selection of Portuguese wines. Any other food emergency can be settled at the front desk, any time of the day. As for the pool, we regret not having spent more time there: its warm water felt great while outside it was rainy and windy. We didn't check the temperature outside, but as we left the pool our skin was steaming.
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Hotels

Hotel Alegria

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real
Hotel Alegria (“joy”) is one of those timeless classics guaranteed never to go out of style. Its decoration successfully meshes  the young and the new, with vintage restored furniture next to design pieces. Everything is rather classic, but there are some bold dashes of colour (for instance, in the same room you will find a blue sofa right in front of a pink one) that will make you smile and nod in agreement. Joy, right? Hotel Alegria might as well be an early 20th century bourgeois family manor, a home full of happy people with a contagious joie de vivre.   The hotel is not particularly big but its 30 rooms are all quite spacious and well designed to take maximum advantage of the available sunlight. That extra space in the rooms conquered at the expense of common areas: there is just a breakfast room (no restaurant at the hotel) and the bar, whose cocktail menu is worth looking into.
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Hotels, Chain hotels

Lisbon Marriott Hotel

icon-location-pin Sete Rios/Praça de Espanha
There are 577 rooms, large and in a classical style. Suites include a living room and a bedroom. The restaurant has a contemporary menu with some modern touches bringing classics to life. In summertime, outdoors tables spread towards the garden and dining takes place along the swimming pool with mood music. Free wi-fi is available everywhere in the hotel. If you feel like a walk around the block, take a morning off to visit the Zoo outside peak hours. We haven't yet mentioned that the Marriott loves families, and thus babysitters are on call whenever parents need a night off.
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Hotel Convento do Salvador

icon-location-pin Castelo de São Jorge
Out of the former convent the only thing remaining is the frame; everything else was conceived from scratch. The old backyard became a hip lounge bar, with light wreaths and mood music to enliven the evenings; the old dining room is now a vibrant living room with a mezzanine for serving breakfast. Proud of its artistic side, the Convento do Salvador likes to lend its salons and walls to major Portuguese and Lusophone artists. Works by Sebastião Salgado, Júlio Pomar, João Cutileiro and Paula Rego are all on display. The lobby tiled panel was commissioned by the hotel to the Pedrita duo.
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