Hotels

The best romantic hotels in Lisbon

Love is in the air in the best romantic hotels in Lisbon. Check in and fall in love, even if it's just for one night


By Time Out Lisbon editors

Posted: Wednesday August 8 2018


Fotografia: Matilde Cunha Vaz
Torel Palace

When it comes to the most romantic cities in the world, Lisbon easily makes the top five. You can take dreamy strolls through the tile-fronted terraces or along the beach, the cafes offer perfect pastries over which you can stare lovingly into each other's eyes, and there are a wealth of luxury hotels in which romance can't help but blossom. Whether that's because of a delicious breakfast is served in bed or because you’ll get highly emotional with the breathtaking views, Lisbon's charming accommodation will make you fall in love even more. Pick your perfect fit now with our guide to the best romantic hotels in Lisbon.

D.R.
Hotels, Boutique hotels

Memmo Príncipe Real - Design Hotels

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real

The modern Memmo Príncipe Real is the third addition to Memmo’s portfolio in Portugal and is in one of the city’s trendiest neighbourhoods. The hotel sits perched on a hill so offers jaw-dropping views of the orange-speckled cityscape from the terrace bar and room balconies. This area is cool and cosmopolitan with a high concentration of boutique shops, chic cafés and snazzy restaurants, which suits the hotel to a tee. Rooms have clean lines and modern furnishings, with homey extras like faux fur throw rugs, a daily tip of things to do in the area, and ingredients to make your own port tonic cocktails upon arrival.

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Hotels

Pousada de Lisboa

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior

Pousada translates roughly as 'no-frills', but don't expect that at Pousada de Lisboa. After all, it's owned by the Small Luxury Hotels of the World group and the finish and service is of the highest quality. Inside you can gaze upon the hotel's commitment to Portuguese arts, as its corridors and public spaces are filled with tapestries by Nadir Afonso, sculptures of St Anthony and more. It's not a museum-hotel, but it's close. There are 90 rooms and suites of varying sizes, all of them comfortable and spacious.

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Pestana Palace Lisboa

icon-location-pin Alcântara

A stay at Pestana Palace Lisboa is a stay at one of the most luxurious hotels in the world. Seriously. Even Madonna stays here when she's in town. Dating back to the 1800s, this colonial mansion once belonged to the Marquis of Valle Flôr, and has been designated a national monument. You don't need to stay here to be able to visit, but if you can afford it, you'll get to experience one of its outrageously elegant 200-odd rooms and suites, the old ballrooms, Valle Flôr restaurant and its traditional Portuguese fare, and the sprawling gardens.

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Altis Avenida Hotel

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior

Nostalgia is said to be a quintessentially Portuguese state of mind, and we might be inclined to agree if you admit we have reasons for it. Just walk around downtown and Lisbon's historic centre and gaze at the city's architectural legacy. That is part of what makes Lisbon so unique: the city has a foot in the past but still looks confidently into the future. Altis Avenida might be the nexus where both strands meet. Urban-chic and 1940s-inspired decor come together beautifully throughout the building. Its 70 rooms feature art deco flourishes, with all the mod-cons: think Nespresso machines, minibar, electric blackout blinds and an a la carte pillow list. On the top floor you'll find the Rossio restaurant.

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Hotel da Estrela

icon-location-pin Lisbon

We may find it endlessly annoying that there is no subway stop near Estrela, but it's not that hard to go up the Avenida Álvares Cabral to get to one of the city's nicest (and busiest) gardens. On your way there, in a street parallel to the aforementioned avenue, you will find the Hotel da Estrela – a unique, cosy and intimate place. There are only 19 rooms, each of which are bright, clean and soundproofed. They also include en suites with walk-in showers, cable TV, seating areas and a minibar.

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AlmaLusa Baixa/Chiado

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior

The whole of Lisbon's downtown owes a lot to the Marquis of Pombal, and that includes the Alma Lusa Baixa/Chiado. The hotel resides in an eighteenth-century Pombaline building, which was renovated and opened as the Alma in 2016. Despite the extensive history however, the interior is exceptionally modern. Its 28 rooms are clean and cool, with separate seating areas, kitchenettes and city views. Even if you don't end up staying at the Alma Lusa Baixa, pay a visit to the Delfina restaurant, where traditional delicacies are given new life with exotic seasonings.

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Torel Palace

icon-location-pin Lisbon

There can be no greater luxury than staying in the city centre while keeping the urban noise at bay and enjoying country-style tranquility. Torel Palace – set up, in fact, in two former palaces – offers that and much more thanks to its well hidden spot between Torel garden and Lavra elevator. A stay here can truly provide peace and quiet when you're not out exploring the bustling city. While back at the hotel, you should take a dip in the pool, get a drink in the bar – one of Lisbon's most exclusive open-air bars – and grab a bite to eat at the restaurant, Cave 23.

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Valverde Hotel

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade

Getting to know and enjoy traditional Lisbon does not necessarily mean getting a room in one of the historic centre's narrow, slippery streets. There are more convenient, equally attractive alternatives that will allow you to learn the ways of the city without finding yourself in the middle of the tourist bubble. The Valverde, in the Avenida da Liberdade, is the perfect choice for that. On display inside are century-old tiles, fine china, old tapestries and vintage furniture, including Moorish heritage carved wooden pieces and marble inlays from days when stone was a mandatory building material for any proper house. Contemporary art is represented by Vieira da Silva works, adding to the hotel's artistic credentials. The 25 rooms aren't huge, but they're comfortable and have sizeable bathrooms (considering).

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Altis Belém Hotel & Spa

icon-location-pin Belém

We're not really sure why, but Belém remains one of Lisbon's most underserved areas in terms of hotels. Especially considering all the major attractions in the area: Belém Tower, Jerónimos Monastery and the Pastéis de Belém pastry shop, to name but a few. This lack of hotels has, however, allowed Altis to grow a modern, luxury hotel right beside the Tagus. This five-star stay offers stunning design inside and out, a Michelin-starred restaurant, rooms with balconies, a pool, spa, Turkish baths and hydrotherapy treatments.

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Olissippo Lapa Palace

icon-location-pin Estrela/Lapa/Santos

In the middle of one of Lisbon's poshest neighbourhoods lies one of its most expensive luxury hotels – Olissippo Lapa Palace. It's not the easiest spot to reach, as the Lapa is a maze of steep and narrow streets – but everything else is incredible. It's a breathtaking nineteenth-century manor house overlooking the Tagus, with expertly landscaped gardens that surround the sun-kissed pool and ornate marble halls. Each room varies in decor, but they're all elegant, with views of the water or the garden. Elsewhere there's a gym, a spa and the restaurant serves Italian cuisine.

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Palácio Belmonte

icon-location-pin Castelo de São Jorge

Some believe it is the world's most beautiful boutique hotel, and we won't say otherwise. Featuring only ten suites each with living and dining rooms, a bedroom and a bathroom, the intimate mood is so valued by the staff you might feel you're at a B&B. All the better for couples in a romantic mood, and for visiting celebrities in search of some peace and quiet. For the full experience, the Bartolomeu de Gusmão suite has three floors and a spiral staircase that once led to a minaret and now is a private space overlooking old Lisbon's rooftops and the Tagus river. Despite lacking a restaurant (there are good alternatives in the vicinities), the hotel won't mind fulfilling the occasional food eccentricity – within reasonable limits.

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Portugal Boutique Hotel

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior
Inside are 53 rooms in a contemporary style, low on frills but high on comfort, next to the Figueira Square. This is an excellent area of the city, close to the Rossio, the Chiado and the Cathedral, where you can enjoy the best Lisbon has to offer without having to go far. This includes the Deck, a traditional Lisbon patio turned into a café. The Portugal Boutique Hotel also offers other quality alternatives, including access to the bar and two restaurants at the nearby Hotel Mundial. One of these is the Varanda de Lisboa, where traditional Portuguese food is served with a panoramic view to the city and the river.
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Hotel Fontecruz Lisboa

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
Its 72 rooms come with a choice of view, according to how much peace and quiet you require. There is the front of the hotel, overlooking the busy Avenida da Liberdade, a lovely boulevard with its share of heavy traffic and nervous honking; or you can face the backyard patio, where the bar's outdoors tables are placed, which offers a rare commodity in the city centre: silence. Conceived by and for young people, in Fontecruz the leisure areas share an open space with the lobby. After checking in we felt tempted to immediately take a detour towards the bar before going up to the room, but we're well behaved and waited patiently until 2pm. At the Bar Small and Delicious (also a restaurant), the gin menu has scores of choices, which connaisseurs will appreciate.
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As Janelas Verdes

icon-location-pin Santos
Graça Viterbo, one of the busiest interior decorators in the country, was tasked with turning a palace where writer Eça de Queirós once lived into a boutique hotel. Mission brilliantly accomplished: the result is there for all to see at the welcoming As Janelas Verdes, a 29-room manor where every corner has traces of the literary and artistic heritage of one of Portugal's most important novelists. There is a friendly mood to the place, perfect for lovebirds looking for the romantic side of Lisbon. The furniture is very much the same as when Eça sat at his wooden desk facing the Tagus to write “The Maias”. The armchairs, oil paintings, heavy drapes and the gorgeous stone and cast iron staircase leading to the top floor library are all original 19th century pieces.
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Fotografia: Ana Luzia
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Memmo Alfama Hotel

icon-location-pin Alfama
A few years ago, the city's most traditional district had little to offer tourists apart from some local lodgings and budget hostels. A less money-conscious traveller looking for a fuller experience would have to look elsewhere. That lasted until the day the Memmo Group decided to up the stakes and start Alfama's first boutique hotel worthy of that name, youthful in spirit but much more ambitious than its neighbours. It is not a luxury hotel, neither is it meant to be one. Memmo wants to be a home away from home, and that requires an informal mood that would not fit in with the five-star model. There are 42 rooms of varying sizes, some with a balcony, others with larger areas to make up for a less inspiring view, and yet a few quieter ones overlooking the inner courtyard.
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Internacional Design Hotel

icon-location-pin Baixa Pombalina
The International Design Hotel's gets 10 out of 10 marks for its location, on the corner of the Rua da Betesga and the Rua Augusta, in the middle of the Rossio. It only lacks official recognition to be a national monument, with its ancient facade being one of Lisbon's oldest. A complete renovation in 2009 cleaned up the dust and brought the city centre a hotel with a strong personality. Its 55 rooms are small, you won't be able to throw a party in them, but they make up for that with their design options, based on four major themes: Urban, Feeling, Zen and Pop.
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Four Seasons Hotel Ritz Lisbon

icon-location-pin São Sebastião

Architect Pardal Monteiro did a stellar job on the Four Seasons Hotel Ritz. The vast concrete exterior looks like a monument in itself, especially the bits carved with murals, but the interior will take your breath away. Get ready for marble-floored halls, huge candelabras, golden furniture, table-wide flower arrangements and art collections, both modern and historic, about whose history you can learn more through the hotel's app. The spa is the finest in the city, with an eighteen-metre indoor pool, mani-pedis with vegan products and over 700 square metres for sports and fitness, including a gym, sauna, Turkish bath, pilates studio and an 400-metre running track on the roof of the hotel.

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Hotel Lisboa Plaza

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
The rooms are great, large and comfy, both classic and relaxed, but it's the rest of the Plaza that truly sings. The original decoration mixes the old and the new with a delightful zest: old furniture and designer pieces, brightly painted walls and marble rooms with armchairs and rocking chairs. Some traces remains of the 1950s, when the hotel opened for business as a meeting point for the artists that drew crowds to the nearby Parque Mayer. It has been managed ever since by the same family, who remained committed throughout the years to the hotel's informal and bohemian style.
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Palacio Ramalhete

icon-location-pin Santos

Located in the Janelas Verdes street, near the Museum of Ancient Art, this is much more than just a hotel with a pretty facade. Every one of its nine rooms and seven suites is unique. Some of them have a view to the Tagus, the others to the inner courtyard, but all of them are faithful to its original architecture, with wooden floors, big windows and painted ceilings. The “wow” moment will come when you open the door to a suite that used to be the palace's kitchen, and gaze at an enormous fireplace. But even that might not be as wondrous as the chapel suite, with its tiled walls and king-sized bed. Ramalhete has something of a double personality: a classical side allied to a more modern perspective.

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Eurostars das Letras

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real
This luxury hotel in the back of the Avenida da Liberdade invites its guests to gather in lively soirées where great writers are remembered. Its 107 rooms got their names from Virginia Woolf, Stendhal, Shakespeare or Mark Twain; snippets of their work hover above the bedposts. Drop by the bar and say hi to Dickens and step inside the conference room to witness an unlikely meeting of Pessoa and Cervantes. All of it is surrounded by a modern atmosphere, with light cascading over design furniture and black marble floors suggesting the hotel's creative personality. Eurostar is unusual in its price – much lower than what you'd might expect in a five-star hotel. But that doesn't mean the staff is any less friendly or the array of services any narrower.
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Lx Boutique Hotel

icon-location-pin Cais do Sodré
Young and stylish enough, this 45-room boutique hotel is located in the nexus between the Chiado and the renewed Ribeira das Naus (a riverside “beach” of sorts). It is geared at young folks, to whom it caters with an artsy but relaxed vibe. Being in the middle of the “movida” scene makes this hotel a typical example of the cool side of Lisbon that puts the city among the world's most seductive destinations. The design options aren't particularly bold, and at a time when boutique hotels compete for pizazz this can be a relief (sometimes less really is more), as it helps create an intimate, home-style environment. This might be a minus if you're not into raw fish but a plus if you love sushi: the hotel's restaurant, Confraria LX, is 100% devoted to Japanese cuisine.
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© Manuel Gomes da Costa
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Bairro Alto Hotel

icon-location-pin Chiado

But the best thing about the Bairro Alto Hotel might be its location, right in the heart of Lisbon (if such a thing may be said to exist), at the Luís de Camões square, where Bairro Alto, Chiado, Cais do Sodré and Príncipe Real all come together: the perfect starting point for hitting every side of the city. In the vicinities you will find baroque churches, historic cafes, restaurants and shops; there is plenty to do for a day of strolling around. But it's at night, especially during the weekends, that the area really comes to life. Where it will lead, time will tell. You can be sure that returning to your room after a night out will be more or less like getting into heaven: a large, fluffy bed, perfect when you need a rest from a long day.

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PortoBay Liberdade

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
Porto Bay Liberdade offers the best of both worlds: a five-star city hotel's luxury, the relaxation and friendliness of a vacation resort. The location, just a couple of minutes from the Avenida da Liberdade, is an added bonus for tourists: in fifteen minutes, you can get to the traditional shops of the city centre or the Chiado. The hotel's name is a bit deceiving. You'd assume it has something to do with Portugal's second city, but actually it comes from Porto Santo, in the Madeira islands, where this group already has 11 other properties. This is their first in Lisbon. The 98 rooms on offer are utilitarian rather than dazzling, but they all have a choice of pillows, a tiny detail that can make or break your hotel stay. To make up for the lack of a spectacular panorama there is a rooftop lounge bar and jacuzzi.
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Brown's Central Hotel

icon-location-pin Baixa Pombalina
Brown's Central is everything but dull. Despite being located in the middle of Pombaline dowtown in an old building, it does not seek to impress through its link to the city's history. Instead, it breaks through the stigma of the hotel as a closed-off space to be a meeting point and an arts venue. Its bar and restaurant both have a cultural program with pop-up concerts and chats, and they are trendy gathering points for artists and prospecting gallerists. The place has an arty feel: a revivalist style recreating the café scene of the early 20th century, combining vintage furniture and contemporary artworks. The common areas have an intimate and familiar feel: walls are painted in strong colours, the floor is tiled and there is an Art Déco-inspired counter.
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Hotels

Solar do Castelo

icon-location-pin Castelo de São Jorge
Designer Graça Viterbo brought an original, intimate feel to this hotel, and thus gave the city centre back a comfortable and glamorous location – a hotel the way hotels used to be in the days before multinational chains. It has a mere 20 rooms – some of them with an amazing view of downtown and the Tagus. Ironically (considering this was once the castle's kitchen) there is no restaurant in the premises, but room service works around the clock with a menu of snacks and salads, and that should do if you're in a hurry. But if you get the evening blues and your body calls for serious nourishment, go out and seek one of the many nearby restaurants – but first wait for sunset, when the inner courtyard is lit.
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9 Hotel Mercy

icon-location-pin Chiado
The hotel has 47 rooms, some of them with a balcony or a patio, but the best view is from the sixth floor terrace, where you can see Lisbon all the way to the river, ideally with sunglasses on while holding a glass of wine. Downstairs, there is no restaurant but Le9 serves light meals; there is also room service. It is important however to notice that the bar does not specialize in food but in mixology: their original cocktail menu is infusion based – they have a great selection of teas. Breakfast is a neverending food festival, so you'd better pace yourself: homemade yogurt, detox juices, “nata” tarts, croissants, five varieties of bread, bacon and eggs are some of the offering. Free parking is available, and so is free wi-fi throughout the hotel.
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My Story Hotel Rossio

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior
The story is MyStory Rossio's, a simple and cheerful hotel whose reputation as one of Lisbon's best goes beyond its excellent location, in the middle of the Rossio. Imagine a clash between the 17th century and a pop art invasion – that's what you will find here. The lobby has stone arcades and neon lights, the bar has ancient tiles, chandeliers and design furniture, the rooms (46 of them) have signs on the wall reading Fado, Lisboa and Amor (fado, Lisbon and love), to let you know romance is part of the story. In 18 of the rooms you will get a view of the Rossio, and you should demand one of them: it's a rare privilege to get to watch the city parading in front of you.
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Myriad by SANA Hotels

icon-location-pin Parque das Nações
Myriad SANA takes the most advantage of having the Tagus by its doorstep: the hotel is literally on top of the water, so there can be no better view of the river. The view is so great you might get seasick – there are rocking chairs by the room windows. The hotel is garishly decorated in tones of red, black and white, with mirrors everywhere. The 186 rooms are a bit more low-key in terms of colours, but the River Lounge Bar is a chromatic explosion. It has a Portuguese menu with a twist; in summer nights, enjoy going over it slowly on the outdoors tables overlooking the Tagus.The hotel's top floor is 143 metres high and holds the Sayana Wellness Spa, with an indoors panoramic pool, a gym, a hammam, a jacuzzi and a floatarium where you can experience zero gravity.
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Hotel do Chiado

icon-location-pin Chiado
Hotel do Chiado was born in a Pombaline building brought back from the ashes by renowned architect Álvaro Siza Vieira, who made a point that every one of its 40 rooms should include a patio or a private balcony with a view towards the Tagus and the São Jorge castle hill. Lisbon begs to be gazed upon, and Hotel do Chiado is the perfect spot to do it – even more so from the Entretanto Rooftop Bar, where the panorama extends as far as the eye can see, all the way until the Arrábida Range. The insides of the hotel have been renovated more than once, and its early garish colours were replaced by a soberer look. Feng-shui principles dictate the room layout, with classic furniture and neutral tones to enhance the relaxing mood.
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Vincci Baixa Hotel

icon-location-pin Baixa Pombalina

Its 66 rooms are not particularly large but they are comfortable and surprisingly well lit, considering how narrow its windows are. The pillow menu is a charming little touch to make up for the diminutive size of the rooms. The hotel comes with two other fine surprises: the Lounge Bar with its relaxed feel, for sipping cocktails; and the Tapas & Friends restaurant, whose purpose is quite clear – unpretentious Portuguese and Spanish snacks for sharing at lunch and dinnertime in the prettiest room of the hotel, a marble-arched hall whose huge windows face the street. Breakfast will prove the theory that you can eat with your eyes. The buffet has a little bit of everything you might crave in the mornings.

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Hotel Borges

icon-location-pin Chiado
Its 96 rooms have different moods and vibes, classic and modern, some traditional, others a bit extravagant, with fur blankets and velvet armchairs. If your room is in the front of the building, your view will be of the busy Largo do Chiado. You won't see far, but that's a small price to pay for staying in the centre of the centre. There is no restaurant in the premises, and no need for one either, considering how many dining options you have in the vicinities: you can dine fish at Sea Me, only five minutes away, or walk the same distance for a Neapolitan pizza at Mercantina. Breakfast is served buffet-style and there is a terrace with a bar to enjoy the sunny days.
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Palácio do Governador

icon-location-pin Belém
The Palácio do Governador (“governor's palace”) in Belém has an Age of Discoveries theme devised by designer Nini Andrade Silva, who drew from the building's history to create an identity for the hotel. A clear view of the Tagus, only a few metres away, is another charming detail. This isn't just another luxury hotel in the city; it is a true representative of Lisbon's character, cosmopolitan and extroverted. Inside, the architectural details were maintained whenever possible; the front desk, where a chapel used to be, still has the original masonry ceilings and tiled wainscots. The hall patio has traces of a factory that once laboured here, and some of the rooms (60 in total) still have arched brick ceilings.
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Lisboa Carmo Hotel

icon-location-pin Chiado
The Carmo's 48 rooms, much like the rest of the hotel, operate under a “less is more” rule, with classic furniture and neutral colours, and the occasional shiny bauble – a gold-rimmed mirror, a colourful armchair, bucolic wallpaper, a leather-upholstered big chair. Only the top floor rooms have an old-style bathtub and a broad view of the Tagus – try and get one of these. If that's not possible, any balcony will afford you a view of the Largo do Carmo. That's not a particularly fascinating view, but history buffs might be interested in learning this was the stage for Portugal's April 25, 1974 revolution, and that nearby lie the ruins of the Carmo Convent. There is also a lively kiosk and plenty of outdoor tables where you can sit and spend a lazy evening watching passersby.
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Monte Belvedere by Shiadu

icon-location-pin Chiado/Cais do Sodré
Located next to the Adamastor Viewpoint – and its outdoor cafe with a view to the Tagus – the Belvedere has a laid back feel (and a contemplative one too – how could it not, with such a view) and home-style comforts. It used to be a house, and only has 12 rooms – actually suites, large and well-lit, simply and tastefully furnished. The building is part of the history of the Santa Catarina hill: in the 1920s, a renowned French perfume factory was located there. Whatever memories remains of its past can now be seen in architectural details or in a few pieces of furniture. The Belvedere tries to make you feel at home – and succeeds. You will feel so at home you might end up falling asleep at the terrace while gazing at the Tagus.
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Hotels, Boutique hotels

Evolution Lisboa Hotel

icon-location-pin Lisbon
For months on end – maybe even years – locals waited for the scaffolding to come down at the Saldanha square; but nothing prepared them for a new building supported by a giant stone hand. Yes, the Evolution Lisboa Hotel is held up by a sculpted hand. The name suggest a futuristic vision, but you couldn't guess what was inside. The hotel is conceived for independent guests or impatient people who can't stand waiting. It goes beyond being an original hotel, it's more of an optimized version of an hotel, where everything is managed in an efficient, quick and informal way. If you're travelling alone, it's paradise: wi-fi, USB chargers and electric sockets are everywhere, so you can stay permanently plugged in. Rooms are modern, spacious and comfortable, including a sitting area, a desk and a view of the city.
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Hotel Figueira Lisboa

icon-location-pin Baixa Pombalina
The hotel couldn't decide between being charming or beautiful, so it decided to be both (beautiful + boutique = beautique). Nini Andrade da Silva is behind its brave and completely outside-the-box concept. The 50 rooms pay tribute to nature in panels with leaves, figs or tree bark, but green is all over. The hotel layout went against the grain and put the spa on its top floor, disregarding the obvious move – an open-air rooftop bar. But there are plenty of rooftops in Lisbon; a panoramic spa is more unusual and valuable.
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Hotel Alegria

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real

Hotel Alegria (“joy”) is one of those timeless classics guaranteed never to go out of style. Its decoration successfully meshes  the young and the new, with vintage restored furniture next to design pieces. Everything is rather classic, but there are some bold dashes of colour (for instance, in the same room you will find a blue sofa right in front of a pink one) that will make you smile and nod in agreement. Joy, right? Hotel Alegria might as well be an early 20th century bourgeois family manor, a home full of happy people with a contagious joie de vivre.   The hotel is not particularly big but its 30 rooms are all quite spacious and well designed to take maximum advantage of the available sunlight. That extra space in the rooms conquered at the expense of common areas: there is just a breakfast room (no restaurant at the hotel) and the bar, whose cocktail menu is worth looking into.

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Hotel Convento do Salvador

icon-location-pin Castelo de São Jorge
Out of the former convent the only thing remaining is the frame; everything else was conceived from scratch. The old backyard became a hip lounge bar, with light wreaths and mood music to enliven the evenings; the old dining room is now a vibrant living room with a mezzanine for serving breakfast. Proud of its artistic side, the Convento do Salvador likes to lend its salons and walls to major Portuguese and Lusophone artists. Works by Sebastião Salgado, Júlio Pomar, João Cutileiro and Paula Rego are all on display. The lobby tiled panel was commissioned by the hotel to the Pedrita duo.
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