Worldwide icon-chevron-right Europe icon-chevron-right United Kingdom icon-chevron-right England icon-chevron-right London icon-chevron-right Latest art reviews

Latest art reviews

Find out what our critics make of new exhibitions with the latest London art reviews

bjork exhibition, mouth
'Bjork Digital' at Somerset House
By Time Out London Art |
Advertising

From blockbuster names to indie shows, Time Out Art cast their net far and wide in order to review the biggest and best exhibitions in the city. Check 'em out below or shortcut it to our top ten art exhibitions in London for the shows that we already know will blow your socks off. 

The latest London art reviews

Courtesy the artist & Zabludowicz Collection. Photo: Tim Bowditch
Art

Shana Moulton

icon-location-pin Zabludowicz Collection, Kentish Town
icon-calendar

Anxiety is at epidemic levels. The painful agoraphobic stress of contemporary life is everywhere, and we’re all looking for a mindful way to escape it. American video artist Shana Moulton uses a character called Cynthia as an avatar for all of that modern angst. 

Time Out says
Photo by Damian Griffiths.
Art

Rhys Coren: Shape of Story

icon-location-pin Seventeen, Haggerston
icon-calendar

The worst people on earth are the ones who take the tube from Covent Garden to Leicester Square. They have no idea what they’re missing. London is a walking city. These damp, polluted streets are built for trudging down; you’re meant to slap your feet on the pavement and make the city your own. Young English artist Rhys Coren knows that. 

Time Out says
Advertising
Peter Doig 'Lion in the Road: Sailors' (2019) © Peter Doig. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2019. Courtesy Michael Werner Gallery, New York an d London.
Art

Peter Doig: Paintings

icon-location-pin Michael Werner Gallery, Mayfair
icon-calendar

After decades of fuzz, fug, fog and gloom, there’s some clarity peeking out of Peter Doig’s work. The Trinidad-based Scottish painter has built a massively influential career out of clouding his works in a haze of dreamlike mist. He paints visions of childhood, nature and obsession that are barely there, like half-forgotten memories. 

Time Out says
Photo by Ulrich Ghezzi
Art

James Rosenquist: Visualising the Sixties

icon-location-pin Thaddaeus Ropac, Mayfair
icon-calendar

Imagine viewing the world through a blob of transparent jelly and you’ll come close-ish to recreating what 1960s America looks like in the art of James Rosenquist. The artist isn’t an especially familiar name to British art fans, but he’s normally scooped up into the pop art bucket. His art ticks a lot of those boxes but he also has an aesthetic of his own. 

Time Out says
Advertising
Courtesy: Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Corvi-Mora, London and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York
Art

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

icon-location-pin Corvi-Mora, Lambeth
icon-calendar

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye’s paintings are stuck in the middle; caught between the past and the present, reality and fiction, freedom and constraint. The British artist captures black figures at rest and at play. A white-shirted couple reads, one in silence, the other speaking out loud. Three characters sit at tables, another lies in bed, a group moves in a line. Everything is quiet, dark, sombre, frozen in twilight.

Time Out says
William Blake 'Newton' (1795 – c.1805) © Tate
Art

William Blake

icon-location-pin Tate Britain, Millbank
icon-calendar

For a man who casts such a huge, dark shadow over the history of British art, William Blake’s drawings, paintings and etchings are quietly unobtrusive little things. The poet, artist and printmaker (1757-1827) spent his life huddled over, creating mesmerising, tiny works to illustrate poems and histories. 

Time Out says
Advertising
Thabiso Sekgala_ Homeland, Johanna Mthombeni, 2009_ Courtesy of the artist and Goodman Gallery
Art

Thabiso Sekgala: Here is Elsewhere

icon-location-pin Hayward Gallery, South Bank
icon-calendar

Thabiso Sekgala’s story is only half-told. The South African photographer came to his medium late, aged 27, and left it early, taking his own life in 2014 at just 33. So what you see across these walls are only the beginnings of an artist. He captures scenes from the South African homelands – rural towns built to house the country’s black communities – alongside mining towns, the Middle East and Berlin.

Time Out says
Cui Jie 'The Second Generation of Peak Tower' (2019) © the artist. Image courtesy of Pilar Corrias
Art

Cui Jie: The Peak Tower

icon-location-pin Pilar Corrias, Fitzrovia
icon-calendar

Victoria Peak is the highest point on Hong Kong Island and the place to head if you want to flood Instagram with panoramic shots of Victoria Harbour. Artist Cui Jie, however, doesn’t want you to look at the view from the peak, she wants you to look at the place you view from.

Time Out says
Advertising
Berni Searle 'Untitled (red)'. From the ‘Colour Me’ series (1998) © The Artist
Art

Made Routes: Mapping and Making

icon-location-pin Richard Saltoun, Mayfair
icon-calendar

Walking into the gallery is like stumbling on a hoard of lost treasures. Old maps, browning and aged, line the walls, the heady scent of pungent spice fills your nostrils. This duo show of South African artists Vivienne Koorland and Berni Searle drags you into a world of closed borders, dark hinterlands and the ever-present shadow of colonial history.

Time Out says
Helene Schjerfbeck 'The Sailor (Einar Reuter)' (1918) Private collection. Photo: Finnish National Gallery / Hannu Aaltonen
Art

Helene Schjerfbeck

icon-location-pin Royal Academy of Arts, Mayfair
icon-calendar

If you’re British, Helene Schjerfbeck (1862-1946) is a relatively unknown artist. If you’re Finnish, Helene Schjerfbeck is a very famous artist. This show of 60 paintings is the first chance London audiences have had to join the Schjerfbeck fan club.

Time Out says
Advertising
Olafur Eliasson 'Your uncertain shadow' (2010) © Olafur Eliasson
Art

Olafur Eliasson: In Real Life

icon-location-pin Tate Modern, Bankside
icon-calendar

Olafur Eliasson does epic like few others. The Danish-Icelandic artist was last at Tate Modern in 2003 with 'The Weather Project', a monumental installation that transformed the Turbine Hall into a pulsating, hazy sunset. This time, they’re showing 40 works, including many large-scale installations, made throughout his career.

Time Out says
Takis 'Radar' (detail) (1960) © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2019
Art

Takis

icon-location-pin Tate Modern, Bankside
icon-calendar

Scraping, screaming, hovering, vibrating: the shards of metal in Takis’s show hum with invisible energy. Since the 1960s, the Greek artist has used magnets to create thrumming, shaking works of abstract sculpture. 

Time Out says
Advertising
copyright the artist, courtesy the artist and massimo de carlo
Art, Contemporary art

Jamian Juliano-Villani

icon-location-pin Massimo De Carlo, Mayfair
icon-calendar

You can’t call the RSPCA for crimes against toys, apparently, but one look at Jamian Juliano-Villani’s art and you’ll desperately want to. I mean, if hammering a dildo into a toy tiger’s mouth over and over again isn’t abuse, then what is? 

Time Out says
Félix Vallotton 'The Bathing on a Summer Evening' (1892-93) Kunsthaus Zürich, Gottfried Keller Foundation, Federal Office of Culture, Berne, 1965
Art

Félix Vallotton

icon-location-pin Royal Academy of Arts, Mayfair
icon-calendar

Félix Vallotton wasn’t just one artist; he was at least three. The French-Swiss painter (1865-1925) was a historically indebted traditionalist, a satirical commercial printmaker and an experimental, fully paid-up member of the turn-of-the-century Parisian avant-garde. He was all of those things, often at once. 

Time Out says
Advertising
Alejandro Hoppe Chile (b. 1961) 'Funeral de Rodrigo Rojas de Negri, Santiago' (1986) Gelatin silver print Vintage print
Art

Urban Impulses: Latin American Photography From 1959 - 2016

icon-location-pin The Photographers' Gallery Café, Soho
icon-calendar

It’s easy to take photography for granted. In fact, it’s easy to get sick of photography. But as this show of Latin American photography from 1959 to 2016 makes clear, cameras have long served a more important function than capturing the light bouncing off an acai berry bowl. T

Time Out says
Out of the Ruins at Cripplegate (1962) by David Ghilchik Image credits: Guildhall Art Gallery, City of London Corporation
Art

Architecture of London

icon-location-pin Guildhall Art Gallery, City of London
icon-calendar

There’s an etching in this exhibition taken from Christopher RW Nevinson’s oil painting ‘Any London Street’. The joke explains itself: this scene of life in a Georgian terrace could come from anywhere in the metropolis, geddit? LOL. Only… it couldn’t. What makes London fascinating is how almost none of its streets or buildings look the same. 

Time Out says
Advertising
Jo Spence 'A Picture of Health: Property of Jo Spence?' (1982) Collaboration with Terry Dennett © The Estate of the Artist. Image courtesy of Richard Saltoun Gallery, London
Art

Jo Spence and Oreet Ashery: Misbehaving Bodies

icon-location-pin Wellcome Collection, Euston
icon-calendar

Walking into ‘Misbehaving Bodies’, the Wellcome Collection’s free exhibition of artworks by Jo Spence (1934-1992) and Oreet Ashery (b. 1966), you first notice two giant, bright pink teddy bears with extra-long arms. The terror-inducing teds sit on the floor under draping canopies of the same intestinal colour. 

Time Out says
Luchita Hurtado 'Untitled' (1969) Image courtesy of the artist. Photo Credit: Jeff McLane
Art

Luchita Hurtado: I Live I Die I Will Be Reborn

icon-location-pin Serpentine Gallery, Hyde Park
icon-calendar

The female gaze is a funny thing. Three little words used to describe everything from lesbian erotic fiction to the abstract expressionism of Lee Krasner. What’s missing from all this talk about ‘the gaze’ is any sense of a physical human being doing the looking. Enter: Luchita Hurtado. 

Time Out says
Advertising
'A portrait of Leonardo', attributed to Francesco Melzi, (c.1515-18) Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2019
Art

Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing

icon-location-pin The Queen's Gallery, Victoria
icon-calendar

If you’ve ever seen Leonardo da Vinci’s ‘Mona Lisa’, then you know you’ve never really seen it. What you’ve really seen is a jostling crush of irritable tourists with their cameras obscuring your view of an enigmatically grumpy Renaissance woman somewhere in the distance. 

Time Out says
Photo: Tate (Matt Greenwood)
Art

Mike Nelson: The Asset Strippers

icon-location-pin Tate Britain, Millbank
icon-calendar

Tate Britain is filled with the corpses of British industry, the long dead, rotting remains of this country itself. Strewn across the massive central Duveen Galleries are chunks of enormous abandoned machinery: presses, clamps, welders, cutters. Some have been left untouched, others have been piled on top of each other. 

Time Out says

Snap up exclusive discounts in London

Time Out's handpicked deals — hurry, they won't be around for long...

Advertising