Latest art reviews

Find out what our critics make of new exhibitions with the latest London art reviews
bjork exhibition, mouth
'Bjork Digital' at Somerset House
By Time Out London Art |
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From blockbuster names to indie shows, Time Out Art cast their net far and wide in order to review the biggest and best exhibitions in the city. Check 'em out below or shortcut it to our top ten art exhibitions in London for the shows that we already know will blow your socks off. 

The latest London art reviews

© Franz West Privatstiftung
Art

Franz West

icon-location-pin Tate Modern, South Bank
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Franz West took all the stuffy, conservative formality of the art world and told everyone where to shove it. The austere reverence of the gallery, the contemplative deification of the artist: West just couldn’t be arsed with it. Instead, the anarchic Austrian artist (1947-2012) created a body of work that’s playful and ludicrous, that feels like one drink too many in a Viennese bar, the art equivalent of a hangover you somehow don’t regret. 

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Nicholas Hilliard 'Man Among Flames'. Image courtesy of National Portrait Gallery
Art

Elizabethan Treasures: Miniatures by Hilliard and Oliver

icon-location-pin National Portrait Gallery, Leicester Square
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Big isn’t always better. Not here, anyway, because this is a show full of tiny, tiny, tiny paintings, and they are gorgeous; achingly small and stunningly intricate portraits of Elizabethan royals, courtiers and poshos by the masters of the form, Isaac Oliver and Nicholas Hilliard.

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Erwin Wurm 'Polaroid' (2018) © Erwin Wurm/DACS
Art

Erwin Wurm: New Work

icon-location-pin Thaddaeus Ropac, Mayfair
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It’s hard to think deep thoughts when you’re stood in a bucket with another bucket on your head. But that’s Austrian artist Erwin Wurm’s big trick: he gets your brain going by pushing things into the absurd. Just look at the Austin Mini in the main gallery. Wurm has plumped it up, fed it way too many burgers and left it obese. Its sides bulge, its chassis overhangs itself. It’s a ridiculous, silly thing. 

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Borders Inclusivity_Farshid Moussavi and Zineb Sedira
Art, Contemporary art

Is This Tomorrow?

icon-location-pin Whitechapel Gallery, Whitechapel
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Back in the 1950s, the Whitechapel put on a collaborative artists-and-architects exhibition called ‘This Is Tomorrow’. It introduced the world to the very first inklings of pop art and brought names like Eduardo Paolozzi, Richard Hamilton and Alison and Peter Smithson smack dab into the public eye. It was seriously groundbreaking, and genuinely seminal. So much so that the Whitechapel has now decided to see, almost 70 years later, if it can repeat the trick.

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Diane Arbus 'Jack Dracula at a bar, New London, Conn. 1961'. Promised Gift of Doon Arbus and Amy Arbus, 2007 Courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York/ Copyright © The Estate of Diane Arbus, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Art

Diane Arbus: In the Beginning

icon-location-pin Hayward Gallery, South Bank
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Diane Arbus was the original people-watcher. Some lads larking around by the coast, a glamorous receptionist at her desk, two women shooting evils at the universe: nothing escaped her notice. The Hayward Gallery’s exhibition of photographs from the first seven years of her career (1956-1962) is sleekly arranged with each small print attached to one side of a tall white rectangle. 

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Tracey Emin 'It was all too Much' (2018) © Tracey Emin. All rights reserved, DACS 2017. Photo © White Cube (Theo Christelis)
Art

Tracey Emin: A Fortnight of Tears

icon-location-pin White Cube Bermondsey, The Borough
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You are inches from Tracey Emin’s face. You’re right there on the pillow next to her, watching her desperately wait for sleep to finally come. Emin suffers from insomnia, and takes selfies as she helplessly wrestles with it. She’s printed them two metres high and pasted them across the walls here. On the one hand, they’re terrifying, ridiculous, even a little stupid. But on the other, they’re… really good.

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Liu Xiaodong 'Weight of Insomnia' (2018) © Liu Xiaodong Courtesy Lisson Gallery
Art

Liu Xiaodong: Weight of Insomnia

icon-location-pin Lisson Gallery, Lisson Grove
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When we imagine the impending robo-apocalypse, the day when the machines finally rise up to enslave the human race, we largely think of violence, nuclear wastelands and those big towers that shoot blue lightning bolts. But inside the Lisson Gallery, humanity is being tossed aside in a much more pleasant way.

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Nicole Farhi 'Cybele' (2018) © the artist and Matt Pia
Art

Nicole Farhi: Folds

icon-location-pin Beaux Arts, Mayfair
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Nicole Farhi is into flesh origami. The concertinaed indents of a bent knee, the twisted softness of part-rotated belly fat, the puckered skin of a damn-it’s-cold areola, that kind of thing. To produce her new series of sculptures based on the bodily beauty of larger women, the artist made plaster casts directly from the physiques of two friends, then re-cast the results in bronze and Jesmonite. 

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© Don McCullin
Art

Don McCullin

icon-location-pin Tate Britain, Westminster
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 Over his career, Don McCullin has photographed things most people don’t want to think about, never mind see. Bloody, foul, repellent conflicts in The Congo, Cyprus, Cambodia, Nigeria, Northern Ireland, Vietnam and Beirut. Many of his images are iconic: his ‘Shell-shocked US Marine, Battle of Hué’ (1968) is a defining image of twentieth-century warfare, not just of Vietnam. 

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Daria Martin 'Tonight the World' (2018) © Daria Martin. Image courtesy of Maureen Paley, London
Art

Daria Martin: Tonight the World

icon-location-pin Barbican Centre, Barbican
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A sad fact of life is that your dreams aren’t interesting to anyone but you. You think people will be fascinated by how last night you were trapped in a spider’s web, but the spider was your primary school teacher and you were naked except for a fez. But your dreams are as tedious to other people as their dreams are to you. So American artist Daria Martin has achieved the impossible by making her grandmother’s reveries into interesting art.  

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Miroslaw Balka 'Random Access Memory' (installation image) © Miroslaw Balka. Image courtesy of White Cube (Theo Christelis)
Art

Miroslaw Balka: Random Access Memory

icon-location-pin White Cube Mason's Yard, St James'
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On first impression, it might look like Polish conceptual art behemoth Miroslaw Balka has made a couple of massive radiators. And on second impression too. And third. That’s because he sort of has. 

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Hanna Moon 'Me and Tyrone for A Nice Magazine Issue 2' (2015) © Hanna Moon
Art

Hanna Moon & Joyce Ng: English as a Second Language

icon-location-pin Somerset House, Temple
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This joint exhibition is inspired by the Asian-born Londoners’ feeling of being ‘lost in translation’, in their new home and in the fashion industry. 

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Bill Viola, 'Fire Woman' (2005) Video/sound installation. Performer: Robin Bonaccorsi. Image courtesy of Bill Viola Studio; Photo: Kira Perov
Art

Bill Viola / Michelangelo: Life, Death, Rebirth

icon-location-pin Royal Academy of Arts, Mayfair
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It’s rare that an exhibition can make you fall to your knees, shake yours fists at the heavens with tears rolling down your face and scream ‘Why, God? WHY?’ But here I am in the Royal Academy’s forecourt doing just that, begging for an answer as to why in the name of Satan you’d put American video art pioneer Bill Viola’s work next to drawings by one of the greatest artists who ever lived. 

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The Anatomy of Melancholy by Robert Burton (Published 1621). Image courtesy of Bethlem Museum.jpg
Art

The Anatomy of Melancholy

icon-location-pin Bethlem Gallery and Museum of the Mind, West Wickham
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Robert Burton’s ‘The Anatomy of Melancholy’ was first published in 1621. The extensive handbook to misery was an unlikely seventeenth-century bestseller and has continued to provide inspiration to gloriously gloomy souls ever since, including Nick Cave, the crown prince of melancholia. This small exhibition at the Museum of the Mind is made up of paintings relating to Burton’s six categories. 

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Beatrice Gibson 'I Hope I'm Loud When I'm Dead' (2018)
Art

Beatrice Gibson: Crone Music

icon-location-pin Camden Arts Centre, Frognal
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‘I dreamt my daughter had become a fried egg…’ explains one of the interviewees in ‘Deux Soeurs Qui Ne Sont Pas Soeurs’, a new film by British artist Beatrice Gibson. The dream-recounting segment is typical of a work that, like a half-remembered scene snatched from the land of nod, both makes sense and doesn’t make sense. Or rather, it makes sense but mainly in the way that a feeling ‘makes sense’. 

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© Pierre Bonnard, 'Coffee' (1915), Tate.
Art

Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory

icon-location-pin Tate Modern, South Bank
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Some paintings seem to shimmer with light, but Pierre Bonnard’s breath-taking images of landscapes, domestic scenes, crowds and bathing women absolutely shake with it. And not just light. They hum with sexuality, vibrate with tension, pulsate with melancholy and almost strobe with colour, colour, colour.

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Alfred Munnings 'Lord Strathcona’s Horse on the March' (1918). Image curtesy of the National Army Museum
Museums

Alfred Munnings: War Artist, 1918

icon-location-pin National Army Museum, Chelsea
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Mud, glorious mud. The dank, sodden environment of the trenches is so instilled into public memories of WWI you’d be forgiven for imagining the only colour a 1914-18 war artist needed in their paintbox was brown. But Alfred Munnings’s oil paintings from the final year of the war make use of the entire rainbow and then some. 

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© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
Art

Russia: Royalty & The Romanovs

icon-location-pin The Queen's Gallery, St James's Park
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There’s an episode in Matthew Weiner’s series, ‘The Romanoffs’, where descendants of Russia’s last royal family get together on a cruise ship and re-enact the glory days of grand balls and staged entertainment. Those with Romanov DNA lap it up, while two married-in relations find the entire event slightly perplexing. Russia, Royalty and the Romanovs, a new exhibition at The Queen’s Gallery, has the potential to inspire a similar division of response. 

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© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
Art

Shadows of War: Roger Fenton's Photographs of the Crimea 1855

icon-location-pin The Queen's Gallery, St James's Park
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In 1855, Roger Fenton arrived in the Crimea on a commission from publisher Thomas Agnew & Sons to photograph scenes and figures from the ongoing Crimean War. After he returned to London, the images were exhibited at four venues in the capital and… that was it. There hasn’t been a London show of Fenton’s creations since 1856. 

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© Peanuts
Art

Good Grief, Charlie Brown!

icon-location-pin Somerset House, Temple
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Anxiety, despair, dread, depression, fear, misery, alienation: a pretty standard Friday night, but an unusual recipe for a kids’ comic strip. ‘Peanuts’ is special, though. Over his tens of thousands of strips – syndicated the world over and read by millions of adoring fans – Charles M Schulz combined simple line drawings and emotional non-sequiturs into little bundles of pure, heart-wrenching modern truth. 

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© Burne-Jones 'The Rose Bower'. Image courtesy of The Faringdon Collection Trust
Art

Edward Burne-Jones

icon-location-pin Tate Britain, Westminster
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I like the Pre-Raphaelites the same way I like pumpkin spice lattes despite 85% of people telling me they’re repulsive. Because these medieval-loving Victorians are the pumpkin spice lattes of British art. They’re syrupy sweet gloop often tinted a strange orange colour and always topped with unnecessary frothy swirls. 

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McDermott & McGough (2017), 'The Oscar Wilde Temple', Church of the Village, New York . Image courtesy of the artists
Art

McDermott & McGough: The Oscar Wilde Temple

icon-location-pin Studio Voltaire, Clapham
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‘The Oscar Wilde Temple’ by McDermott & McGough is one of those artworks that’s difficult to ‘review’. Not because it isn’t beautiful, wonderfully detailed, clever in its use of art history or politically poignant. It is all of those things. But because this entirely immersive installation isn’t really intended to just be art.

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Copyright Jenny Holzer and Tate
Art, Contemporary art

Artist Rooms: Jenny Holzer

icon-location-pin Tate Modern, South Bank
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American artist Jenny Holzer’s work is decades’ worth of statements, aphorisms, quotes and poetry. She takes words and sentences and plasters them over the streets, prints them on cups and condoms, engraves them into marble, and sends them stuttering at lightspeed along LED columns. 

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