Worldwide icon-chevron-right Europe icon-chevron-right United Kingdom icon-chevron-right England icon-chevron-right London icon-chevron-right How ‘Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour’ stormed the West End

Heads up! We’re working hard to be accurate – but these are unusual times, so please always check before heading out.

The cast of ‘Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour’ © Manuel Harlan
The cast of ‘Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour’ © Manuel Harlan

How ‘Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour’ stormed the West End

The six-strong cast of West End hit ‘Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour’ talk school, ELO and letting it rip

By Alice Savile
Advertising

Somewhere between a gig, a play and the messiest night out you’ve ever had, the Olivier-winning ‘Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour’ is the story of the chaos that unfolds when six Scottish Catholic schoolgirls use a choir trip to Edinburgh as an excuse to go totally nuts. After two years on tour, it’s hitting the West End. We asked the cast why you shouldn’t miss it.

Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour’ is at the Duke of York's Theatre until Sep 2 2017. 

OLOPS. Frances Mayli McCann (Kylah). Photo credit Manuel Harlan..jpg
Photo credit Manuel Harlan

1. Frances Mayli McCann

‘When the show first opened at the Edinburgh Fringe we were just so involved in it that we never gave a thought to what people would think. Then we got to the stage and it just erupted! Scottish audiences were amazing. America was a bit different: we had to cut out a few of the swearwords and a small percentage of the audience even walked out. But we’re not asking people to like us. This is our story, take it or leave it.’

OLOPS. Kirsty MacLaren (Manda). Photo credit Manuel Harlan..jpg
Photo credit Manuel Harlan

2. Kirsty MacLaren

‘It’s so much fun to play a teenager, because you get to relive that time of abandonment where you lived for that day, and the most important people were the friends around you. The show’s based on Alan Warner’s novel “The Sopranos”, which is amazing. He really sees these girls. There’s not much punctuation so it’s just like word vomit, they’re just talking and talking and talking like real teenagers do.’

Advertising
OLOPS. Dawn Sievewright (Fionnula). Photo credit Manuel Harlan..jpg Credit: Photo credit Manuel Harlan
Photo credit Manuel Harlan..jpg Credit: Photo credit Manuel Harlan

3. Dawn Sievewright

‘I play Fionnula, the leader of the gang. She’s fiesty, bossy, and she just powers through life letting nothing stand in her way. At high school I knew I wanted to be an actor so I was bad, really bad. When I read the book, I was just like – this is me. I had to get the part, because I knew I wouldn’t need to act! My mum loves it, but I wouldn’t want to be saying “cunt” in front of my granny – she’s a good churchgoing woman. ’

OLOPS. Isis Hainsworth (Orla). Photo credit Manuel Harlan..jpg
Photo credit Manuel Harlan

4. Isis Hainsworth

‘I’m 18, so I’m the youngest by some way. At first I was really nervous but they are all looking after me and making sure I know what I’m doing. It’s also quite helpful because my character Orla is kind of the young, naive one: she’s missed out on growing up because she had cancer. For me, school feels like it was just the other day. I don’t miss it – if your phone went off you’d get “detention!” screamed in your ear.’

Advertising
Our Ladies Of Perpetual Succour. Duke of Yorks. Karen Fishwick (Kay). Photo credit Manuel Harlan.jpg
Photo credit Manuel Harlan

5. Karen Fishwick

‘These girls are from Oban, it’s a really quiet fishing town. I went to Catholic school so I know what it’s like to want to break out from all those rules, and that’s what the songs let us do. ELO is such an epic choice for the songs in the show. When you think about those ’70s synths and those huge crunching chords you don’t automatically think all-girls choir. But especially with the live band, it’s like “Pow!” It’s so exciting

OLOPS. Caroline Deyga (Chell). Photo credit Manuel Harlan..jpg
Photo credit Manuel Harlan

6. Caroline Deyga

‘My favourite part of the show is where I say “Let’s go fucking mental.” That’s the girls’ battle cry. It’s the moment where you go, “Oh my God, these girls are absolutely nuts.” Audiences get so swept up in it, too. I’m 28, but I’ve had people ask me things like, “Will you be going back to school after the summer?” They find it hard to believe it’s not real. But actually, I was a goody-two-shoes at school, so this show has given me all these regrets...’

See which other London shows we're loving

Top ten theatre openings this month

Theatre

London's theatre calendar is flooded with exciting new shows, big names and hotshot directors, and there's no way anyone can see them all. Check out our latest theatre reviews for the full rundown.

Recommended

    You may also like

      Advertising