Ladbroke Grove area guide

Discover leafy Ladbroke Grove's best restaurants, bars and pubs with Time Out's very helpful guide

© Jael Marschner

Once (apparently) the epicentre of London's underground, the leafy little enclave of Ladbroke Grove is a little smarter these days. And while the musicians and misfits have been replaced with a bit of money, the spirit remains, with the restaurants, bars and pubs of W10 and W11 pretty much all the proof you need - they're ace.

What are your favourite Ladbroke Grove haunts? Let us know in the comments.

Restaurants in Ladbroke Grove

Lowry & Baker
Restaurants

Lowry & Baker

The northern branch of the Notting Hill tribe loves Lowry & Baker – so much so that one local advises against even trying to get in at the weekend. This is the kind of local café most people dream about: warmly welcoming and with a laid-back attitude that makes you feel immediately at home.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Books for Cooks
Restaurants

Books for Cooks

Books for Cooks runs on a simple but very successful formula. From the small open kitchen, co-owner Eric Treuillé puts recipes (one starter, one main) from the cookbook(s) of the day to the test. There’s no choice – until it comes to pudding, when there’s an array of must-try cakes (lemon victoria sponge, raspberry and pear cake, or chocolate and orange cake, say) – but the standard of cooking is high.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Rossopomodoro
Restaurants

Rossopomodoro

For an ever-expanding chain (there are now six branches in London, one in Birmingham and outposts worldwide from Spain to Saudi Arabia), this pizza and pasta joint bats well above average. The Notting Hill branch is a buzzy affair with exposed brickwork and bright wall canvases, populated by families and ladies who lunch (Italian signorinas on our last visit – a good sign).

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
E&O
Restaurants Book online

E&O

Will Ricker’s restaurants make up a small but impressive pan-Asian empire (plus one much-lauded Mexican street food hotspot). The well-thought out menu is brief, with just enough little touches to pique diners’ interest – black vinegar paired with crispy pork belly, barbecued beef bulgogi with coriander raita.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Book online

Ladbroke Grove highlights

Acklam Village Market
Things to do

Acklam Village Market

This very popular, community-focused weekend market is the local's alternative to Portobello Road. So much so that it was a 2018 Love City Award winner – voted by the people. 

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
Museum of Brands, Packaging & Advertising
Museums

Museum of Brands, Packaging & Advertising

A fascinating museum that will appeal to any lover of stuff – this is a nostalgia-stuffed tribute to the many, many things we buy.

Users say
4 out of 5 stars

Ladbroke Grove bars and pubs

Trailer Happiness
Bars and pubs Book online

Trailer Happiness

Remaining laudably tongue-in-cheek while the rest of Ladbroke Grove drowns in chichi spots, Trailer Happiness is not a cocktail bar as such – with its deliberately tacky decor (Tretchikoff paintings galore) and DJ hatch, it’s far too informal for that. However, the drinks here are taken seriously, with many of them made to vintage American recipes, and both the mai tai (Appleton V/X rum, orange curaçao, orgeat syrup, bitters, fresh lime) and the Cotton Mouth Killer (Elements 8 Platino, Mount Gay and Wray & Nephew rums, lime, apple, guava juice, apricot brandy, Galliano) do justice to the legend. The recommended beer is not American but König Pilsener from the German town of Duisberg; ingredients for the food, among them ‘TV dinners’ such as beef fajitas, are sourced as much as possible from the area.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Book online
Rum Kitchen
Bars and pubs Book online

Rum Kitchen

Venue says: “Fancy learning a little about rum? Then join us for our weekly 'Rum Chronicles' masterclass.”

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Book online
Castle
Bars and pubs

Castle

Whatever the price and quality of the gastropub fare (pork belly and mash for a tenner, roasted root risotto at £7.50), this is a proper Portobello local. The majority of the jolly, bohemian-minded punters hanging around the pleasingly sparse, open-plan interior – probably at the bar – seem cheerfully merry whatever the time of day, which istestament of sorts to the agreeable atmosphere cultivated by the matey staff. There’s music three or four nights a week; the rest of the time, it’s a free for all, with unshaven musos hammering back Black Sheep, Staropramen, Kirin or Leffe. A couch in one corner affords comfort to couples.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Portobello Star
Bars and pubs Book online

Portobello Star

Gentrification has sunk its claws into this once-scruffy boozer, for years one of the holdouts along the Portobello Road. Fronted by a couple of pavement tables but no real sign, Portobello Star ‘take two’ is a long, thin room; the only relief from the plain walls is provided by the sturdy bar along one side and a lovely radio-themed mural. It’s a handsome space, more appealing than it seems at first glance, but the real draws are the likeable bartenders’ powerful, convincing renditions of cocktails both traditional (a richly flavourful mint julep with Woodford Reserve, a margarita modified by agave) and modern (Dick Bradsell’s Bramble). You may have to shout to make yourself heard when the DJs crank it up a little – the music policy bounces from generic indie to more danceable tunes – but the lively crowd of Notting Hillbillies don’t mind a bit.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Book online

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