Worldwide icon-chevron-right North America icon-chevron-right United States icon-chevron-right California icon-chevron-right Los Angeles icon-chevron-right ‘Blade Runner’ filming locations in L.A. that you can visit

‘Blade Runner’ filming locations in L.A. that you can visit

Step into dystopian L.A. with a visit to these ‘Blade Runner’ filming locations in Los Angeles

Advertising
Bradbury Building
Photograph: Courtesy Ashim D’Silva

It’s 2019 and cop Rick Deckard (played by Harrison Ford) is tasked with tracking down a rogue group of synthetic humans through the streets of dystopian Los Angeles. Maybe that’s about all you remember of Blade Runner’s plot, but if you’ve seen director Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi classic (or at least, one of the seven different versions cut together) there’s likely one aspect you certainly remember: the setting. The film transforms the city into a moody, smoke-and-fire–filled, neon-drenched metropolis where flying cars and floating video advertisements streak across the skyline. Most of those filming locations are still standing today, particularly in Downtown L.A., and you can visit, and even walk inside of, a number of the landmarks (and one studio tour)—which we’ve gathered below. And if you’ve never seen Blade Runner? Consider these filming locations a worthwhile tour of some of L.A.’s most beautiful buildings and landmarks.

Union Station
Photograph: Courtesy Union Station
Things to do

Union Station

Downtown

The beautiful, light-flooded Downtown train depot doubles as the police station in the film. You can’t just waltz into the section used for the movie, though; Union Station’s historic ticketing hall, a popular filming and event spot, is only accessible through free art and architecture tours held every second Sunday from 10:30am to 12:30pm.

Bradbury Building.
Photograph: Michael Juliano
Things to do

Bradbury Building

Downtown Historic Core

Walk through the archway entrance of this nondescript brick building on Broadway and you’re greeted with a stunning, light-flooded alley of wood, iron and brick. You may barely recognize it in Blade Runner, though; blue-lit fog obscures nearly everything but the zigzagging staircases and glass ceiling during the film’s climactic showdown with Roy Batty (as well as the creepy, toy-filled hideout for J.F. Sebastian). You’ll have to do all of your gawking from the ground floor (and half a flight of stairs) as the rest of the building is private office space.

Advertising
Million Dollar Theater
Photograph: Courtesy Yelp/Gino I.
Things to do

Million Dollar Theater

Downtown Historic Core

Blink and you’ll miss it, but when replicant Pris goes in search for Sebastian, she finds him across the street from this historic venue, visible in the background of the scene. While you typically can’t go inside, the 1917 theater—the first of the Grauman movie palaces—occasionally opens its doors for screenings, particularly during Last Remaining Seats and some off-site Cinespia events.

Warner Bros. Studios
Photograph: Courtesy CC/Flickr/JeffChristiansen
Things to do, Walks and tours

Warner Bros. Studios

Burbank

You won’t find Blade Runner’s buzzing underbelly in any alleyway in Downtown L.A. Instead, the film’s neon-drenched East-meets-L.A. market was filmed on the Warner Bros. backlot. Take a ride on the studio tour and you’ll catch a glimpse of this city stand-in.

Advertising
Ennis House
Photograph: Courtesy Kevin T/Yelp
Attractions, Historic buildings and sites

Ennis House

Los Feliz

While you can’t actually step inside the Frank Lloyd Wright house that doubled as Deckard’s home, that’s alright: Only the exterior of the Mayan-temple–like textile block home was shot on location, while the memorably low ceilings of the interior were actually part of an on-set recreation. That said, you can still admire the home from the front gate.

2nd Street Tunnel
Photograph: Courtesy CC/Wikimedia/Maretta Stiles

2nd Street Tunnel

On Deckard’s drive home, he passes through the unmistakable sparkly sheen of Downtown L.A.’s 2nd Street Tunnel. The white-tiled tunnel connects Figueroa Street with Hill Street and is accessible by both car and bike.

You may also like

    Advertising