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LA Pride 2017 guide

Check out our LA Pride guide for the best places to eat, drink and party during the LGBT festival in WeHo

Photograph: Eleonor Segura
Los Angeles Pride Parade 2014

Over three colorful days in West Hollywood, LA Pride attracts upwards of 400,000 revelers. This inclusive festival is a huge party, even by L.A.'s standards, and stands out as one of the biggest pride events in the country. Before you head to West Hollywood Park and stake out a spot for the Pride Parade, check out our suggestions for the best places to eat and drink in WeHo, plus our favorite party spots for divas and drag queens alike.

When is LA Pride 2017?
LA Pride Week 2017 runs from June 5 through the 11. The actual Festival takes place June 10 and 11, 2017 at West Hollywood Park (647 N San Vicente Blvd).

Where can I watch the parade?
Instead of a parade this year, there will be a #resistmarch. The march kicks off on Sunday at 8am from Hollywood to West Hollywood. It will take place on the same day as and in solidarity with the National Equality March for Unity and Pride in Washington D.C.

Who's performing?
So far, on the bill is Brandy, Chromeo, Young M.A., Erika Jayne, Aaron Carter, Brooke Candy, ILOVEMAKONNEN, Spencer Ludwig, Tish Hyman, Leon Else, Connell Cruise, Kat Dahlia and Jesse Montana, with more to be announced.

What else is going on this year?
There's a Women's Party on June 6 and a Trans Party on June 9. June 9 is also LGBT Day at Dodger Stadium.

How much are festival passes?
Single-day tickets for both Saturday and Sunday are $25. Two-day tickets are $35. Beyond the ticket price, you're also willing to donate a bit extra.

LA Pride photos

LA Pride 2016
Blog

LA Pride 2016

In the face of deep sadness, the annual LGBTQ fest was a chance to celebrate diversity, resilience and courage.

LA Pride 2015
Things to do

LA Pride 2015

Over three colorful days, hundreds of thousands of revelers flocked to West Hollywood Park for LA Pride 2015.

LA Pride 2014
Things to do

LA Pride 2014

We went down on the street (and across the rainbow crosswalks) to bring you our favorite moments from LA Pride 2014.

LA Pride 2013
Things to do

LA Pride 2013

Check out the characters we found at this year's LA Gay Pride weekend.

LGBT news, nightlife and more

Street closures and details for LA Pride and the Resist March
Blog

Street closures and details for LA Pride and the Resist March

This weekend, the streets will be filled with the official LA Pride celebrations and a protest march for LGBTQ rights. The events are bringing lots of people out, which means street closures, traffic advisories and more details you should be aware of before heading out. In light of current events, organizers have chosen to switch the traditional Pride parade with it’s fun floats and performers for a more serious Resist March. Members of the public are invited to make signs and turn out to join the protest on Sunday. Marchers will meet at 8am at the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue for an opening ceremony. After that, the group’s scheduled route will have them walk west on Sunset Boulevard, turn south on La Brea, then west on Santa Monica Boulevard where they will continue until arriving at West Hollywood Park. Upon arriving at the park, they will be greeted with speeches from politicians and leaders including Nancy Pelosi, Adam Schiff and Maxine Waters, according to the L.A. Times. To accommodate the marchers, Hollywood Boulevard will be closed between Highland and La Brea from 6am to noon, Santa Monica Boulevard and all streets one block off of it from Doheny Drive to La Cinega and Fairfax Avenue from Sunset to Santa Monica will be all closed from 9:30am to 1pm. There will be some additional rolling closures along the rest of the route, including portions of Sunset Boulevard, Fairfax Avenue, Santa Monica Boulevard and Franklin Avenue. These will be

Dyke Day celebates the diversity of the LGBT community
Blog

Dyke Day celebates the diversity of the LGBT community

For 10 years the organizers of Dyke Day have carved a space amid the glitz and excitement of LA Pride weekend for a more DIY—and inclusive—celebration. The annual picnic, held on the Saturday of Pride weekend, was launched as a response to WeHo’s big event. The individuals behind the first Dyke Day felt they weren’t seeing themselves reflected in the larger, more commercial celebration and  set out to create something representing the diversity of the LGBT community. “We are very conscious of including trans and queer [people] and queer and trans people of color in our space,” says organizer Vanessa Craig. Dyke Day has grown from a small get-together  to an all-day alfresco fete for queer individuals, families and allies. This year, festivities move to a leafy new home at Ernest E. Debs Regional Park in Montecito Heights.  The volunteer-run party, funded entirely by  donations and benefit events, has developed an identity as more than just a scrappy alternative to LA Pride. It focuses on building a strong  grassroots community from the (park) ground up.  Dyke Day LA takes place June 10 at noon at Ernest E. Debs Regional Park. Free.   

The best LGBTQ Pride parties of 2017
LGBT

The best LGBTQ Pride parties of 2017

June is LGBTQ Pride month and we think that is a pretty good reason to party. In addition to the festivities in our official LA Pride 2017 guide, there are plenty of unofficial parties happening all across the region. From raging dance parties at the best clubs in Hollywood to events organized by the folks to know in L.A.'s queer women scene, there's something for every taste and type at these Pride parties. Love is love! 

These six people are pouring their talent, energy and heart into L.A.'s LGBT community
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These six people are pouring their talent, energy and heart into L.A.'s LGBT community

L.A. has always been at the forefront of LGBT culture, from the activists who staged some of the country's first gay-rights protests to artists who today imbue their work with the politics of their sexual and gender identities. As far as we've progressed, though, there is still work to be done, and L.A.'s queer community has been putting in the effort. To celebrate their efforts and achievements, we're highlighting six local heroes who work to create a more inclusive future for all of us and, in doing so, are making the whole city proud.    Photograph: Rozette Rago   Madin Lopez, hairstylist and founder of ProjectQ Madin Lopez began styling hair at age 16 as a way to become self-sufficient after an adolescence in the foster care system. Through the work, Lopez, now 30, found a path to forge an identity—and a way to help others. ProjectQ, Lopez's nonprofit organization serving homeless LGBTQIA youth, provides identity-affirming makeovers, mentorship and a safe space for vulnerable people often at war with the version of themselves they see in the mirror.  Lopez works intensely with many trans and gender-nonconforming individuals, particularly people of color, guiding them in finding an outward presentation more in line with how they self-identify, making them feel more comfortable and validated.  "At the end of the day, what we do isn't just about haircuts or building worthiness in the youth or people in the streets," explains Lopez. "It's also about trust-building

This year's L.A. Pride parade will be replaced with an LGBT Resist protest march
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This year's L.A. Pride parade will be replaced with an LGBT Resist protest march

The annual L.A. Pride parade in West Hollywood will be replaced this year with a political rally and LGBT Resist march through the streets, held in conjunction with other LGBT rights marches around the country. Organizers are expecting 250,000 to 500,000 marchers to participate, according to Advocate. Switching to this more overtly activist Pride demonstration is likely to appease some in what has in recent years become a growing push back against West Hollywood’s signature celebration. Critics accuse the event of being overblown, mainstream and removed from the original spirit of Pride. The march is scheduled for June 11 along a three-mile route that starts at the Hollywood and Highland complex and moves along La Brea to Santa Monica Boulevard, culminating at the L.A. Pride festival entrance on San Vicente Boulevard in West Hollywood. Almost 70 percent of the outdoor space used for last year’s main Pride celebration will be unavailable this year due to a multi-year construction project underway in West Hollywood Park, meaning the festival aspect of the event—last year there were three stages of entertainment and performances—had to be scaled back and the formal parade canceled, decisions already in play prior to the decision to hold the protest march. Now, having all the marchers arrive at a reduced-capacity festival is causing some concern among organizers. “We may have half a million people who come on the march. If I only have room for 5,000 people on San Vicente, whe

West Hollywood restaurants and bars

The best West Hollywood restaurants
Restaurants

The best West Hollywood restaurants

Fuel up with breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner at these superb spots.

The best West Hollywood bars
Bars

The best West Hollywood bars

From an aviation-themed cocktail bar to a rowdy Irish pub.

The best coffee shops in West Hollywood
Restaurants

The best coffee shops in West Hollywood

You're going to need a little caffeine to keep up with this neighborhood's nightlife.

Comments

2 comments
Kira K
Kira K

Can you please display the map?

janpaolo
janpaolo tastemaker

LA Pride 2016 was so much fun! I had a blast! There's a long line to get in, because of the security check and metal detectors. But after that, it's like a fair. Food booths, food trucks, beer-margarita-mixed drinks booths are everywhere. Also, lots of cuties everywhere! After all, it's LA Pride / LA Pride Gay Festival! Also, I saw Daya and Carly Rae Jepsen perform! The music performances are the highlight of the festival. Overall, I definitely recommend going to the festival, whether your straight or gay - You're guaranteed to have fun and enjoy it! #TOTastemaker