Worldwide icon-chevron-right North America icon-chevron-right United States icon-chevron-right California icon-chevron-right Los Angeles icon-chevron-right LA Pride 2019: Everything you need to know

LA Pride 2019: Everything you need to know

Check out our LA Pride guide for the best places to eat, drink and party during the LGBTQ festival and parade in WeHo

LA Pride Parade 2015
Photograph: Foster SnellLA Pride Parade

Over three colorful days in West Hollywood, LA Pride attracts upwards of 400,000 revelers. This inclusive festival is a huge party, even by L.A.’s standards, and stands out as one of the biggest pride events in the country. Before you head to West Hollywood Park and stake out a spot for the Pride Parade, check out our suggestions for the best places to eat and drink in WeHo, plus our favorite party spots for divas and drag queens alike.

When is LA Pride 2019?

LA Pride Week 2019 runs from May 31 through June 9. The actual LA Pride Festival takes place June 8 from noon to 1am and June 9 from 11am to 11pm at West Hollywood Park (647 N San Vicente Blvd). In addition, there’s a free Friday night opening ceremony from 8 to 11pm.

Where can I watch the parade?

The parade begins on Sunday, June 9 at 11am-2pm and makes its way from Hollywood to West Hollywood. Look for it along Santa Monica Boulevard between Fairfax Avenue and La Cienega Boulevard.

Who’s performing at the festival?

Meghan Trainor, CupcakKe, Years & Years and Ashanti top the bill, with support from Amara La Negra, MNEK, Dej Loaf and more. Plus, Paula Abdul headlines a free Friday night concert.

How much are festival passes?

Single-day tickets for both Saturday and Sunday start at $20. Two-day tickets start at $30. In addition, there’ll be a free block party this year, held on Santa Monica Boulevard between San Vicente and Robertson Boulevards from noon to 7pm both days.

LGBTQ news, nightlife and more

Plan LA Pride 2019 like a pro with these parade and festival tips
News

Plan LA Pride 2019 like a pro with these parade and festival tips

Last year’s LA Pride Festival sold out for the first time in its 48-year history, with thousands of rainbow-laden attendees flooding Santa Monica Boulevard. If we’re to glean anything from that record-breaking celebration, it’s to come prepared. What’s the deal? Are you ready to Pride, L.A.? The 2019 LA Pride Festival takes place at West Hollywood Park on June 8 (noon–1am) and 9 (noon–11pm), bookended by Friday’s new opening ceremony (8–11pm) and Sunday’s prized LA Pride Parade (11am–2pm). Activations like the Trans Galeria (a photo-op installation), Erotic City (a leather and S&M workshop) and Sizzle (an alcohol- and substance-free carnival) return to the festivities this year, peppered between the three concert stages. Once a humble street fair, LA Pride has evolved into one of the biggest events of its kind in the country, with increasingly star-studded musical acts. At this year’s fest, soulful pop star Meghan Trainor headlines on Saturday, with electro-pop trio Years & Years on Sunday. CupcakKe, Kodie Shane, Ashanti, Pabllo Vittar, Amara La Negra, Greyson Chance and DeJ Loaf round out the lineup of LGBTQ and allied performers. Though the parade is gratis to watch, the ticketed festival will cost you: $30 for a day (VIP $250) or $50 for the weekend (VIP $450). Want to join in on the fun for free? Sign up for a four-hour volunteer shift and you’ll receive a complimentary single-day ticket. What’s new in 2019? Pride revelers will get more costless access than ever, s

Locals on when they first felt accepted in L.A.
News

Locals on when they first felt accepted in L.A.

These out Angelenos share where they first discovered community within the city. Gaby Dunn, financial advisor and comedian   Photograph: Courtesy Robyn Van Swank I was lucky to find community initially through—shock of all shocks—entertainment. I made it a point to go to the queer comedy shows and queer networking events. That’s how I found Autostraddle, a gay lifestyle website, and its employees. I never got into the WeHo scene, and instead I cocooned myself in a community of queer and trans women on the Eastside. Then, last summer, I joined a Varsity Gay League kickball team and met a bunch of gay men who I’d almost forgotten existed. We were not a very good team so it became more about laughing on the sidelines and talking about music or the differences between dating apps. Some of these men are now among my closest friends. Although we’re similar, their experiences are also different and something I needed to be around. Especially in these scary political times, it’s more important than ever that all facets of the LGBTQ community have each other’s backs, hang out, and validate each other. It’s easy in L.A. to isolate to just “your” group, even within such a marginalized community, so the best part for me has been to get out of my bubble, kick a ball, and embrace and celebrate the entire LGBTQ spectrum. Ralph Bruneau, marriage and family therapist   Photograph: Courtesy John Fry/Tank’s Takes Eagle L.A. is home to me. The Pulse massacre was so devastating b

An organizer of the Black Cat protest revisits that fateful night
News

An organizer of the Black Cat protest revisits that fateful night

  Outside the Black Cat on February 11, 1967 Photograph: Courtesy ONE Archives at the USC Libraries     On New Year’s Eve in 1966, undercover officers at the Black Cat Tavern in Silver Lake began to handcuff and beat the patrons and staff as everyone was exchanging celebratory midnight kisses. An estimated 14 people were arrested, many charged with lewd conduct and forced to register as sex offenders for the rest of their lives. Other Silver Lake gay bars, including New Faces, a few doors down, were targeted the same evening. Two years before the Stonewall uprising, more than 200 people came together outside the Black Cat for one of the earliest U.S. LGBTQ-rights demonstrations. Picketers gathered on February 11, 1967, to peacefully protest the police raids that had been conducted weeks before. Alexei Romanoff, a former owner of New Faces, describes the Black Cat demonstration as a turning point. During a time in which homosexuality was illegal in most states, LGBTQ people developed elaborate codes and survival strategies to avoid arrest. But that February night, Romanoff says, the community stood up and fought back. Now 82, he is the last surviving organizer of Personal Rights in Defense and Education (P.R.I.D.E.), one of the groups that helped stage the 1967 stand. We traveled back to that monumental moment with Romanoff.   Romanoff in 1968 Photograph: Courtesy Alexei Romanoff     How were the protests organized? We didn’t have computers, we didn’t have

Queer spaces where you can feel out and proud all year long
LGBT

Queer spaces where you can feel out and proud all year long

We scoured the best coffee shops, gay bars, libraries and more to find L.A.’s most accepting spots to hang out, learn and party.

Show more

LA Pride photos

LA Pride 2018
News

LA Pride 2018

A record number of attendees turned out this year.

LA Pride 2017
News

LA Pride 2017

Thousands of Angelenos took to the streets of Hollywood and West Hollywood on Sunday in solidarity with the vibrant LGBTQ+ community of the city. Instead of the usual float-filled parade, though, the LA Pride event aligned with the #ResistMarch. The protest sought to protect the inclusive, human rights progress that has been made these last couple years—and now faces political threats.  Several iconic personalities showed up to speak and march with the crowd, including RuPaul and Bamby Salcedo. The theme was love, diversity, and equality as participants exercised their rights to protest peacefully throughout the day. The drinking and partying still went on at the bars afterwards. After all, what better way to show your Pride than by partying it up with your best friends? Here are some of our favorite photos from the event.   Gayhearts #ResistMarchLA pic.twitter.com/JkVhSvNLzT — Steve Lekowicz (@lekowicz) June 11, 2017   A post shared by Annie (@themodernjean) on Jun 12, 2017 at 9:03am PDT   A post shared by Gabriel Olsen (@gabrielbolsen) on Jun 11, 2017 at 11:32pm PDT   Proud to stand up with my LGBTQ friends at #resistmarchla! ❤️ trumps 🔥 pic.twitter.com/qGzSFhDCHZ — Timothy Phan (@timothy_phan) June 11, 2017   A post shared by Elon Schoenholz (@elonschoenholz) on Jun 11, 2017 at 10:48pm PDT   A post shared by Baby Gap (@dragbabygap) on Jun 11, 2017 at 9:40pm PDT   A post sha

LA Pride 2016
News

LA Pride 2016

In the face of deep sadness, the annual LGBTQ fest was a chance to celebrate diversity, resilience and courage.

LA Pride 2015
Things to do

LA Pride 2015

Over three colorful days, hundreds of thousands of revelers flocked to West Hollywood Park for LA Pride 2015.

LA Pride 2014
Things to do

LA Pride 2014

We went down on the street (and across the rainbow crosswalks) to bring you our favorite moments from LA Pride 2014.

LA Pride 2013
Things to do

LA Pride 2013

Check out the characters we found at this year's LA Gay Pride weekend.

West Hollywood restaurants and bars

The best West Hollywood restaurants
Restaurants

The best West Hollywood restaurants

Fuel up with breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner at these superb spots.

The best West Hollywood bars
Bars

The best West Hollywood bars

From an aviation-themed cocktail bar to a rowdy Irish pub.

The best coffee shops in West Hollywood
Restaurants

The best coffee shops in West Hollywood

You're going to need a little caffeine to keep up with this neighborhood's nightlife.

The best gay bars and clubs in Los Angeles
LGBT

The best gay bars and clubs in Los Angeles

When it comes to gay bar and club options in L.A., there’s lots to choose from,