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Mother Wolf Dining Room
Photograph: Courtesy Eric Wolfinger

The best restaurants in Hollywood

From everyday lunch fare to ritzy Michelin-starred seafood, here are the best spots to dine in Tinseltown.

Patricia Kelly Yeo
Written by
Patricia Kelly Yeo
Contributor
Stephanie Breijo
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Hollywood may be known for its star-studded walkways, tourist traps and over-the-top movie premieres, but it also happens to be home to some of the best food in Los Angeles. The neighborhood’s restaurants—yes, inevitably filled with a celeb or two—run the gamut in terms of price point and type of cuisine, making the area a destination spot for serious lovers of Thai cuisine and social media influencers alike. Whether you're craving spicy noodles at a few of L.A.'s best Thai restaurants or a Michelin-starred dinner from one of the city’s best seafood restaurants, you’ll find something to enjoy the next time you find yourself in the heart of Tinseltown.

For everything else in L.A. that's good to eat: The best restaurants in Los Angeles

Hollywood's best restaurants

  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Hancock Park
  • price 3 of 4
Award-winning celebrity chef Nancy Silverton's Italian mecca at Melrose and Highland still draws crowds more than a decade in. Whether you're looking for the Michelin-starred, refined pastas and soulful plates of Osteria Mozza, the perfectly blistered, seasonally adorned pies at Pizzeria Mozza or the rustic wood-fired fare of Chi Spacca, this three-restaurant complex has a little something for everyone and continues, unsurprisingly, to be the city's gold standard. It's that good. Just whatever you do, whichever concept you're in, be sure to save room for dessert—there's creamy butterscotch budino to be had in the pizzeria.
  • Restaurants
  • Thai
  • East Hollywood
  • price 2 of 4
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With dozens of celebrity photos and "best of" lists on the walls, chef Jazz Singsanong’s Thai Town restaurant is one of the city’s cult favorites—and serves Angelenos in memory of her brother, L.A. Thai-food legend chef-owner Tui Sungkamee, who passed away in 2017. The Crispy Morning Glory Salad is an obligatory dish: a flavorful mix of crunchy, deep-fried Chinese watercress, plump shrimp, red onions, cilantro, cabbage and bell peppers marinated in the spicy house dressing. If perusing the lengthy menu leaves you dazed and confused, the green mussel curry—succulent New Zealand mussels piled high and bathed in an aromatic Southern curry flavored with lemongrass, sweet pineapples and chiles—is a good place to start on the extensive list of fiery Northern and Southern Thai specialties.

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  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Hollywood
  • price 3 of 4
To watch an omelette being made at Petit Trois is a thing of beauty. First there is the butter, a massive pad that swirls around the pan before being flooded with whipped eggs over low heat. The mixture sits, briefly, then is taken off the stove and gently poked and prodded for minutes until it is finally folded into one uniform, buttercup-hued omelette. Oh, and did we mention that Boursin cheese is piped through the middle? Perceived simplicity is what chef Ludo Lefebvre aims for at Petit Trois. The menu is a sparse list of classic French dishes—steak frites, mussels marinières, chicken leg—in a casual bistro atmosphere. Burger aficionados will also enjoy Lefebvre’s Big Mec. A hulking mass dripping with bordelaise sauce, it’s best eaten with a fork and knife.
  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Hollywood
  • price 3 of 4

Located in the heart of Hollywood (with requisite steep $15 valet), Mother Wolf is pasta maestro Evan Funke’s ode to hyper-regional Roman cuisine, as well as veritable celebrity magnet. The Hollywood restaurant’s all-around glamorous dining room, complete with red banquette seats, mirrored columns and chandeliers, might conjure up visions of grand old New York City dining rooms, but the sprawling menu of pane, pasta, pizza and more feel more of-the-moment than anything else. Regulars at Venice's Felix might recognize a few dishes, but the elegant dining room, elevated approach to service and standouts like the bruschetta di porchetta and rigatoni all’amatriciana make Mother Wolf a must-visit for large groups, longtime fans of the chef and anyone else who loves a damn good cacio e pepe.

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  • Restaurants
  • Seafood
  • Hollywood
  • price 4 of 4

Few restaurants aim for, little less achieve, the level of culinary precision and excellence on display at Providence on Melrose Avenue every night of service. While this hushed, white-tablecloth restaurant is based around seafood, it’s really much more than a fish palace. It’s one of the best fine dining restaurants on the West Coast, with the two Michelin stars to match. Fish just happens to be its primary muse—from farm-raised sustainable caviar to Dungeness crab, Maine lobster, abalone, geoduck clams, Spanish octopus, Santa Barbara spot prawns and wild, line-caught Atlantic striped bass. Whether you're ordering a la carte or opting for the chef's menu, there’s always an incredible cut of steak thrown into the mix as well.

  • Restaurants
  • Bistros
  • Hollywood
  • price 3 of 4

Serving European-style bistro fare with California influences, Horses is the latest restaurant in the space that once housed Ye Coach & Horses—a Hollywood hideout dating back to the ‘30s. Horses takes a blended preservationist approach to its three-room interior, all while offering top-notch cocktails and lavish dishes, including fried veal sweetbreads, a cheesy, all-endive Caesar salad and a Cornish game hen dressed with dandelion panzanella. Both drinks and desserts, including a must-order dark chocolate tart with milk sorbet, are executed with razor-sharp precision, lifting the upscale Hollywood bistro from “pretty good” to the ranks of “great.”

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  • Restaurants
  • Mexican
  • Hollywood
  • price 3 of 4

Inside the Tommie Hollywood, steps away from other notable newer openings like Bar Lis, Ka’teen channels sceney Tulum resorts with a reed tunnel entrance, a lush outdoor dining room and an expansive, Yucatan-inspired menu by Wes Avila, who also runs Chinatown’s Angry Egret Dinette. Here, Guerrilla Tacos’ former head chef offers plenty of crowd-pleasing small plates, though larger format dishes like lamb neck barbacoa and pescado zarandeado (grilled whole fish) easily steal the spotlight at Ka’Teen. For those who can snag a reservation, the beautifully designed space is perfect for a dressy girls’ night, a stylish date night and, well, any night for the typical area crowd.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Hollywood
  • price 2 of 4

Featuring a minimalist Japanese-inspired menu that defies categorization, Kensho exists in the liminal space between the Magic Castle and historic landmark Yamashiro. Pairing a carefully curated sake and natural wine list with a small, almost-Japanese menu full of excellent small plates, Kensho’s less-is-more ethos has made it one of the most magical, underrated dining experiences in the city.

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  • Restaurants
  • American creative
  • Hollywood
  • price 4 of 4

Located in the Second Home co-working space in East Hollywood, this Michelin-starred fine dining restaurant from Vietnamese American chef Minh Phan (also of the temporarily closed Porridge + Puffs) is a post-pandemic homage to the natural world. Named for a crystal formed under extreme conditions, Phenakite presents guests with an ever-evolving, seasonal omakase menu that not only draws on Phan’s heritage, but all the cuisines of L.A., to produce lively, entertaining dinners worth the cost and need for advance planning.

  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Hollywood
  • price 3 of 4
At 102 years young, Musso & Frank Grill is Hollywood's oldest restaurant, a steak-and-cocktails joint formerly favored by Charlie Chaplin and Raymond Chandler. Most recently, it’s been featured in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, though it’s also served as a backdrop for countless films. With its classic steakhouse dishes and individually priced sides (and salad dressings), the menu can be daunting. However, some dishes are fail-safes: At breakfast, grab an order of crêpe-thin flannel cakes; later in the day, a giant slab of steak will do the trick. And every table gets a half-loaf of house-made sourdough bread, the perfect accompaniment to Musso & Frank's legendary martini, which comes with a little extra in a sidecar on the side.  
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  • Restaurants
  • Taiwanese
  • Hollywood
  • price 1 of 4
This funky, fun restaurant run by two Thai American immigrant women serves classics and dishes made from the recipes of a 90-year-old Thai grandmother. Enough said. If that hasn't already convinced you, here's a little more info: Though the setting is no-frills, we think it's just all the better to set the stage for some serious Thai heat. The Phuket-style crab curry Kanomjean is the move here, with whole claws and legs shooting up from a thick, spice-sludgy mix to be enjoyed with rice noodles and plenty of herbaceous accoutrements. For people with a lower tolerance for capsaicin, try their elegant jade noodles topped with fish balls, roast duck and red barbecue pork.
  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Hollywood
  • price 2 of 4

If you want amazing California-influenced French food and well-made cocktails, go to Gigi’s. If you want to see paparazzi attempt to snap photos of B-listers, go to Gigi’s. If you want a sculptural hunk of bread as moving as any exhibition at LACMA, go to Gigi’s. If you want to dress up, go to Gigi’s. Despite the mid-luxury cars lining the nearby curbs and the tryhard crowd, the food at this NYC-inspired upscale French-ish dinner spot with an intimate dining room and string-lit sidewalk patio makes trying to snag a reservation more than worthwhile. They now also offer a smaller food menu at their gorgeous bar, a friendlier set-up for last minute walk-ins.

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  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Hollywood
  • price 3 of 4

Located in the lobby of the Hollywood Roosevelt, one of the city's most historic hotels, the Barish is award-winning local chef Nancy Silverton's Italian-influenced version of an old-school steakhouse. Named after Silverton's 19th-century Canadian family farm, the Barish features a menu with steakhouse classics and new takes on the chef's trademark bread and pasta dishes—including an unforgettable rigatoni filled with squash and goat cheese. Don’t miss out on ordering Silverton’s famous gelato for dessert.

 

 

  • Restaurants
  • Cafés
  • Hollywood
  • price 1 of 4

San Francisco's famous Tartine bakery continues its L.A. expansion with Tartine Sycamore, a café and coffee shop located just steps from Gigi’s and Sightglass Coffee. Selling house-made bread, sandwiches, pastries, rice porridges, quiches and, of course, Tartine's signature smørrebrød toasts, this location is the daytime cafe that keeps the neighborhood around it well-fed until Gigi’s opens for dinner. We also love their swoon-worthy morning buns—though they’re also available at their Silver Lake and Santa Monica locations across town.

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  • Restaurants
  • Thai
  • Thai Town
  • price 2 of 4

Angelenos rhapsodize about Thai Town’s Ruen Pair with a fervor that borders on obsession. At this round-the-clock favorite, the enticing Southeast Asian menu is full of beer-friendly, shareable plates like fish cake pad ka prow, spongy, light rounds sautéed in basil leaves and vibrant chilies, which justifies a visit on its own. Stir-fry with Chinese olive and ground pork is served with crispy bits of flavorful meat and fresh garlic paired alongside a bowl of steaming rice. Another must order: the sautéed morning glory. Ask for it with crispy pork belly for the ultimate late-night Thai combo.

  • Restaurants
  • Vietnamese
  • Hollywood
  • price 1 of 4
This tiny Hollywood strip mall shop is the home of James Beard-nominated chef Casey Felton, whose mouth-watering Vietnamese banh mi (listed as banh oui on the menu) integrate ingredients from all over the world. Served on French rolls and typically gussied up with pickled vegetables and homemade chicken liver pate, the modern Vietnamese sandwiches are the star of the show here, though you can also find salads, fries and an excellent burger on the menu. Come earlier in the morning for a breakfast-friendly egg banh oui, which features the same mix plus an over-easy egg.
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  • Restaurants
  • American
  • Hollywood
  • price 3 of 4
Curtis Stone’s steakhouse greets you with a butcher case as soon as you open the door, tempting you with coils of lamb sausage or hefty cuts of steak to take home. But not everyone is a wiz when it comes to cooking their own meat, which is why the stunning restaurant component is always worth a visit. On their way in, diners may also stop in awe at Gwen’s glitzy dining room, where chandeliers dangle above and that open fire pit separates diners from the kitchen for an entirely modern-elegant affair.
  • Restaurants
  • Californian
  • Hollywood
  • price 3 of 4
The idea behind Salt’s Cure is a noble one: Every meal is made from ingredients grown and raised in California, all of which are carefully butchered and crafted in-house. And it's not just a tagline here; it's a way of life for chef-owner Chris Phelps, who’s also expanded his griddle cakes-focused eatery, Breakfast by Salt’s Cure, to West Hollywood, Santa Monica and NYC’s West Village. At Phelp’s original restaurant, you can count on a great burger, as well as an array of salads and proteins, including a brown butter pork chop topped with apple butter. It’s at breakfast and brunch, though, where Salt’s Cure truly shines; if you’re in the area before noon, make sure to pay a visit for their build your own breakfast plates—including, of course, the crepe-thin, must-order oatmeal griddle cakes.
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  • Restaurants
  • Thai
  • Thai Town
  • price 1 of 4
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The homestyle cooking of this Thai Town joint attracts traditionalists citywide. You won't find fusion or overly sweet noodles at Sanamluang Café—only some of the best Asian comfort food (and slightly intimidating waitresses). Start with the classic tom kha kai, a spicy coconut soup with plump chicken, mushrooms, lemongrass, lime juice and fresh chili for a refreshing starter. Then take a menu detour with the khao pad krapow gai, a satisfying and fiery chicken-basil-rice stir-fry topped with an optional egg, and khana moo grob: This crispy and juicy chunks of pork paired with broth-wilted Chinese broccoli is a must. Wear relaxed clothing and dig in.

  • Restaurants
  • Mexican
  • Hollywood

When you’re craving cozy Mexican American food with (literal) flaming margaritas, the Hollywood location of El Compadre (the other is in Echo Park) is ready to serve you every iteration of cheese, tortilla, rice, beans, salsa and a dash of sour cream and guacamole under the sun. Endless chips and salsa also mean that you’ll never leave hungry from this oldschool spot, which dates back to the '70s. El Compadre’s fun, unfussy atmosphere and solid food mean that it’s a party almost any day of the week—so make a reservation if you can.

 

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