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Huntington Library
Photograph: Michael Juliano

March 2022 events calendar for Los Angeles

Plan your month with our March 2022 events calendar of the best activities, including free things to do, festivals and our favorite concerts

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Shed that extra, light sweatshirt—spring is here. Fill your lungs with the sweet, less-smoggy air on one of the best hikes in L.A. or set out in search of some (fingers crossed) wildflower blooms. Whether you’re looking for things to do around town or a weekend getaway, there are plenty of springtime happenings to find in our March events calendar.

RECOMMENDED: Full events calendar for 2022

This March’s best events

  • Art
  • Film and video
  • price 2 of 4
  • Miracle Mile

“Hayao Miyazaki,” which opens with the Academy Museum’s debut on September 30, features over 300 storyboards, concept images and backgrounds, many of them on display outside of Studio Ghibli’s Tokyo headquarters for the first time. It pulls from the director’s 11 feature films, with a particularly strong tilt toward My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away as well as his lush, enchanted forest settings. Find out more in our full preview of the exhibit.

  • Art
  • Film and video
  • price 2 of 4
  • Little Tokyo

At some point, you should probably read the materials lists for each one of Pipilotti Rist’s installations. Because that’s the only way you’d know that the garments in the entrance’s 29 Palms Chandelier are specifically used underpants, or that, yes, those lampshades in the glowing strands of Pixel Forest are indeed labia-shaped. But save all that reading for after your visit, because “Pipilotti Rist: Big Heartedness, Be My Neighbor” crafts such a surreal, fully-realized world using projections and furniture that it’s best to just completely give in to its colorful, curious city and mull it all over later (as you undoubtedly will). Everything seems so purposefully fit for the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA that you might not even realize the works here span more than three decades: Rist’s retrospective has wrapped everything up in a layout that uses alleyways and house exteriors to link together psychedelically-decorated living rooms and curving hallways of curtains. Everything feels alive. There’s something waiting around every corner, whether a warehouse-wall–sized video projection or a top-down diorama of a bedroom that’s been been ripped open by the moon, and the pieces are always accompanied by sounds to pull you forward: birds chirping, water dripping, leaves rustling, a spectral cover of “Wicked Game.” The focus is on visuals, though, and the oddly hypnotic draw of a screen. Rist’s often female-form–inspired projections play out across every canvas size: tucked into books

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  • Art
  • Painting
  • price 2 of 4
  • Miracle Mile

To coincide with the arrival of the Obama portraits, LACMA has staged this complementary exhibition of Black American portraiture. A mix of mostly paintings with some photographs and sculptures mixed in, the 140 or so works on display all feature Black subjects, dating from as early as 1800 through emancipation, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights and Black Power eras and into today. The salon-style assembly is dense (and mostly pulled from the museum’s own collection), but “Black American Portraits” has no shortage of stop-you-in-your-tracks pieces: The colors in a pair of Kehinde Wiley paintings pop off the wall; Bisa Butler’s Forever quilts Chadwick Boseman into a lush Wakandan paradise; Renee Cox’s ultrawide photograph The Signing imagines the ink drying on the Constitution with an all-Black caucus; and Titus Kaphar’s Behind the Myth of Benevolence hides a Sally Hemings stand-in behind a cut-off canvas of Thomas Jefferson. The subjects, too, are often familiar, from Frederick Douglass to Patrisse Cullors to Grace Jones to Kobe Bryant. Though “Black American Portaits” debuts with “The Obama Portraits Tour,” it’ll extend past that exhibition’s January bow and stick around into the spring. Access is included with a general admission ticket.

  • Music
  • Music festivals
  • San Bernardino

This springtime spin-off in Insomniac’s Wonderland series takes its whimsical, carnival-like atmosphere to this trance-heavy festival. The dreamy, multi-stage experience includes the likes of Above & Beyond, Jauz, Diesel, Paul Van Dyk, Jason Ross, DJ Snake, Seven Lions, Timmy Trumpet, Zeds Dead and more.

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  • Art
  • Prints & editions
  • price 2 of 4
  • San Marino

Dive into literary maps, both figurative in the case of a typescript draft of James Joyce’s Ulysses and literal with J.R.R. Tolkien’s map of Middle Earth, in this collection exhibition from the Huntington Library. Among the 70 items on display, other imaginary maps include Lewis Carroll’s 1876 edition of The Hunting of the Snark, Robert Louis Stevenson’s maps from Treasure Island and Kidnapped and Octavia E. Butler’s maps from notes for Parable of the Talents.

  • Things to do
  • Exhibitions
  • price 2 of 4
  • Miracle Mile

Play “Q” for the day at this assembly of some of the most famous gadget-adorned vehicles to appear in 007 films. The Petersen has put together a collection of 30 cars, motorcycles, boats, submarines, helicopters and scale filming models of aircraft from six decades of James Bond movies. Highlights include the 1977 Lotus Esprit S1 Submarine from The Spy Who Loved Me, a 1999 BMW Z8 from The World Is Not Enough and the 2019 Aston Martin DB10 from Spectre.

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  • Things to do
  • Exhibitions
  • price 3 of 4

Keep ya head up: There’s an official exhibition dedicated to the late, iconic West Coast rapper Tupac Shakur that’s headed to L.A. The Shakur Estate-sanctioned “Tupac Shakur. Wake Me When I’m Free,” will debut in Downtown L.A. on January 21, 2022 for a limited time, after which it’ll embark on a multi-city tour. “WMWIF” describes itself as “part museum, part art installation, part sensory experience.” Music will, of course, factor heavily into the experience, but so too will Shakur’s activism and art. The exhibition will also tell a parallel story of his mother, Afeni Shakur, a Black Panther who played a massive role in shaping her son’s outlook on life and art. Tickets go on sale November 12 at 10am, though you can secure your spot a little earlier if you opt for the front-of-line presale tickets on November 9. You’ll find the 20,000-square-foot space at the Canvas at L.A. Live (944 Georgia St). If, like us, you’ve never heard of it until now, you’ll find it off Olympic on Georgia Street, across from the JW Marriott.

  • Things to do
  • Exhibitions
  • price 2 of 4
  • USC/Exposition Park

This West Coast debut traces the career of legendary scientist and conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall, from her childhood in the U.K. to her years in Africa studying chimpanzees (including a breakthrough discovery of their use of tools) to her current role as an activist and advocate. Goodall’s life story is wildly inspiring: That with determination, compassion and curiosity, a single person can drastically change how we think about our place within the natural world. The exhibit can’t quite capture all of that, but it does present an easy-to-understand, kid-friendly retelling of her life’s work (a more sensitive corner on chimps in captivity is tucked behind a curtain). For her work observing chimps in the wild, the exhibition employs some particularly neat technological tricks: a hologram-like rendering of Goodall, beautifully-shot video walls, a CG recreation of chimp behavior that hovers behind a window and projections that appear to literally grow out of her notebook, to name a few. “Becoming Jane” also features some of Hugo van Lawick’s stunning footage of Goodall in Africa. If you find that particularly compelling, we’d recommend the 2017 documentary Jane for a deeper dive into her groundbreaking observance of chimps.

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  • Things to do
  • Exhibitions
  • price 3 of 4
  • Hollywood

It seems like the trend of room-filling, artist-inspired projections is here to stay because the folks behind Immersive Van Gogh have announced the next painter that’ll take over their Hollywood space: Frida Kahlo. From March 31 through June 11, 2022, the Mexican painter’s surrealist portraits will mix alongside historical photographs in “Frida: Immersive Dream.” The multi-city spectacle, put on here by Lighthouse Immersive and Impact Museums, says it’ll focus on both Kahlo’s life story and signature pieces, including works like The Two Fridas, The Wounded Deer and Diego and I. The digital creation onces again comes from Massimiliano Siccardi, whose busy take on Van Gogh we found to be a lot. And like Van Gogh, timed tickets (which are available now) are very pricey, starting at $40 on some weekdays and ticking up to $70 on weekend evenings.

Looking for some more things to do this month?

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