1. Malthouse Theatre 2016 exterior day photograph courtesy Malthouse photographer credit Tim Grey
    Photograph: Malthouse/Tim Grey
  2. Malthouse Merlyn Theatre 2019 supplied image
    Photograph: Malthouse/Charlie Kinross
  • Theatre
  • Southbank

Malthouse Theatre

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Time Out says

This former brewery, gifted to the arts by Carlton and United in 1986, is the home of Malthouse Theatre – Melbourne’s innovative producer of new Australian work. The building has two theatre spaces: the 500-seat Merlyn theatre and 180-seat Beckett Theatre.

The onsite cafe and bar should take care of all your snacking, dining and drinking needs.

Details

Address
113 Sturt St
Southbank
Melbourne
3006

What’s on

Macbeth (An Undoing)

3 out of 5 stars

“If there be nothing new, but that which is, hath been before…” So begins William Shakespeare’s 59th sonnet. Without plunging into a deep dive about how queer his raft of poems dedicated to the ‘Fair Youth’ who goes by he/him pronouns are, this opening provocation reads like a prophecy. As if the Bard has stumbled upon a coven of three Weird (or wayward) Sisters upon the heath and granted a vision of how often his works will be rewritten.  Which brings us neatly to the bajillionth retooling of The Tragedy of Macbeth – aka The Scottish Play – by fellow British playwright Zinnie Harris. She previously reclaimed ancient Greek playwright Aeschylus’ tragic triptych The Oresteia, Norwegian titan Henrik Ibsen’s downward spiralling The Master Builder and Jacobean dramatist John Webster’s similarly bloody The Duchess of Malfi. Macbeth (An Undoing) is spun on the idea that we’ve only heard half of the story and that this version will correct the record of the infamous Lady Macbeth. It’s not the first feminist retelling. In fact, there’s been a glut of late, including Scottish crime writer Val McDiarmid’s Queen Macbeth and fellow novelist Isabelle Schuler’s Queen Hereafter. But is it magic? Back to the witches’ prophecies. The hurly-burly of this rewriting works best when it’s commanded not by the Macbeths (Bojana Novakovic and Johnny Carr, who starred in Bell Shakespeare’s 1999 production of Romeo and Juliet and 2018 Antony and Cleopatra respectively) but by a towering Natasha Herbert’

  • Drama
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