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Photograph: Courtesy Luna Park

The best things to do in NYC with kids April 2020

Use our April events calendar to find the best NYC events for kids! Your family will love these great picks!

Allie Early
Written by
Allie Early
&
Danielle Valente
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UPDATE: Events in NYC have been cancelled due to coronavirus. Some offerings on this list might be affected—if you're unsure, please call ahead to confirm.

It's finally sunny, the flowers are blooming, and our April events calendar includes so many amazing things to do in spring! Get ready for cherry blossoms and plenty of exciting outdoor activities for kids to enjoy together. If it's warm enough, we also support you dining al fresco at our favorite kid-friendly outdoor restaurants.

RECOMMENDED: Full NYC events calendar

See below for some fantastic kids' events coming soon (and check back as we continue to add more). We'll see you there!

April events for kids in 2020

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Too soon to daydream about warm afternoons on the Coney Island Boardwalk? Never!  Undoubtedly intending to cure our winter blues, Luna Park revealed on Instagram that it will kickstart its new season on Apr 4, 2020—an announcement that typically doesn't come until later in the year. Regardless, we gladly welcome this exciting news about one of our favorite kids' amusement parks, even if we're still bundled up in winter garb. Even better news? This year marks Luna Park's 10th anniversary, and the family attraction promises a ton of surprises are in store for its visitors. The exciting, albeit cryptic, remark definitely has us looking forward to the spring. 

  • Things to do
  • City Life

We can't wait to see "Worlds Beyond Earth," the new show that will premiere at the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History on Jan 21. It celebrates the Age of Exploration we're living in right now—humans have only made it as far as the moon, but we have sent out probes and spacecraft to collect data and send it back to Earth. Think about it: Robotic explorers have been to the surface of the moon, and documented the icy and volcanically active surface of Jupiter's moon Io, and observed the showers of liquid methane on Saturn’s moon Titan. "Worlds Beyond Earth" transports you to the far corners of our solar system and beyond with detailed scenes drawn from scientific data. Plus, it's narrated by Academy Award-winning actor Lupita Nyong’o—the cosmos never sounded so good. This is the first new show to run at the Hayden Planetarium since Dark Universe," narrated by Neil deGrasse Tyson, premiered in 2013. "Dark Universe" is familiar to many NYC kids—and parents. After all, a visit to the AMNH is one of the best winter activities for kids around, and one of the best indoor activities for kids you can do in NYC.

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  • Sports and fitness
  • Sports & Fitness

Ready to hang 10 on the halfpipe?  Vans just opened a new indoor skate park in Brooklyn, and it's the perfect place for wannabe Tony Hawks to work on their moves. Bushwick's coolest new attraction, Space 198 (198 Randolph St), allows athletes of all ages and skill levels to test out ramps, ledges and other skate-worthy concrete features. Plus, it makes for a great winter activity for kids.  Photograph: Courtesy Vans OH: Did we mention it's free?! All that's required is to RSVP online. 
The sessions are as follows:  Thursdays: 2–4pm, 4:30–6:30pm, 7–9pm Fridays: 2–4pm, 4:30–6:30pm, 7–9pm Weekends: Noon–2pm (Kids session ages 6–12), 2:30–4:30pm, 5–7pm, 7:30–9:30pm. 

  • Museums
  • Childhood
  • Upper West Side
Every day at the Children's Museum of Manhattan is filled with activities that will entertain, delight and educate your youngest ones—it's like the best playdate ever, again and again. There are more than a dozen activities every day, from puppet shows to storytime to mural painting to Fantastic Fort Building. Check the calendar for the day's offerings, and look for special events like Drag Queen Story Hour. All ages.
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  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Drama
  • price 4 of 4
  • Midtown West
Theater review by Adam Feldman  The world of Harry Potter has arrived on Broadway, Hogwarts and all, and it is a triumph of theatrical magic. Set two decades after the final chapters of J.K. Rowling’s world-shaking kid-lit heptalogy, the two-part epic Harry Potter and the Cursed Child combines grand storytelling with stagecraft on a scale heretofore unimagined. Richly elaborated by director John Tiffany, the show looks like a million bucks (or, in this case, a reported $68 million); the Lyric Theatre has been transfigured from top to bottom to immerse us in the narrative. It works: The experience is transporting. Jack Thorne’s play, based on a story he wrote with Rowling and Tiffany, extends the Potter narrative while remaining true to its core concerns. Love and friendship and kindness are its central values, but they don’t come easily: They are bound up in guilt, loneliness and fear. Harry (Jamie Parker) is weighted with trauma dating back to his childhood, which hinders his ability to communicate with his troubled middle son, Albus (Sam Clemmett); it doesn’t help that Albus’s only friend is the bookish outcast Scorpius Malfoy (the exceptional Anthony Boyle), son of Harry’s erstwhile enemy, Draco (Alex Price). Despite the best intentions of Harry’s solid wife, Ginny (Poppy Miller), and his friends Hermione (Noma Dumezweni) and Ron (Paul Thornley), things turn dark very fast. Set designer Christine Jones and lighting designer Neil Austin keep much of the stage shroude
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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 3 of 4
  • Midtown West
One of the more unlikely musicals on Broadway this season, Come from Away is the tense but humane story of an airport in Gander, Newfoundland, where 38 planes and more than 6,000 passengers were forced to land on September 11, 2001. The book, music and lyrics are by the Canadian team Irene Sankoff and David Hein. Read the full review.
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 4 of 4
Theater review by Adam Feldman  Teenage girls rule in the tart but sweet new Broadway musical Mean Girls. But their system of high-school government is far from a democracy: It’s a reign of terror, angst and mall fashions, where popularity is arrogated and then ruthlessly enforced. Having spent her childhood being home-schooled in Kenya, nature and math enthusiast Cady (Erika Henningsen) is initially confused by the rigid caste system of her new school in Chicago. She tries to be nice, but the ruthlessness of American teenage culture brings out Cady’s predatory instincts. She reverts to the mean. A canny crossbreed of Heathers and Hairspray, the musical has been adapted by Tina Fey from her own 2004 cult movie, and updated to reflect the new realities of smartphones and social media. Fey is one of the sharpest comic writers in America, and the show remains, in some sense, her vehicle: an auto de Fey, burning with bookish anger at the limits young women place on each other and themselves. (Her film role as a pushy calculus teacher is amusingly evoked by Kerry Butler, who also plays the other adult women.) But this version of Mean Girls is not just a copy of the original. The most famous lines from the screenplay are here, but Casey Nicholaw’s energetic staging wisely breezes past them; the newer jokes get bigger laughs, while the score—by Jeff Richmond and Nell Benjamin—successfully builds on Fey’s knowingly corrective tone. (“This is modern feminism talkin’,” sings a high-
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