The top five New York art shows this week

Check out our suggestions for the best art exhibitions you don’t want to miss, including gallery openings and more
Photograph: Courtesy Mobius Gallery, Bucharest and VACATION, New York
Advertising

With New York’s art scene being so prominent yet ever changing, you’ll want to be sure to catch significant shows. Time Out New York rounds up the top five art exhibitions of the week, from offerings at the best photography and art galleries in NYC to shows at renowned institutions like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art and the Guggenheim.

Top 5 Monday, Aug 13–Sunday, Aug 19

Gertrude Abercrombie, Reverie, 1947
Photograph: Courtesy Illinois State Museum
Art, Contemporary art

Gertrude Abercrombie

icon-calendar

It’s been 66 years since Gertrude Abercrombie (1909–1977) last exhibited in NYC, so it’s been awhile since New Yorkers have been able to acquaint themselves with the work of this midcentury Surrealist painter, who was born in Texas, and spent most of her life living in Chicago’s Hyde Park. Modest in scale, Abercrombie’s compositions—typically done in oils on masonite—feature cryptic landscapes and interiors that serve as backdrops for the artist’s personal iconography of doors, cats, owls and ladders, which she often combines with her own self making mysterious appearances fraught with psychological drama.

Installation view of Fernando "Palma Rodríguez: In Ixtli in Yollotl, We the People" at MoMA PS1
Photograph: Kris Graves, courtesy MoMA PS1
Art, Contemporary art

“Fernando Palma Rodríguez: In Ixtli in Yollotl, We the People”

icon-location-pin Long Island City
icon-calendar

MoMA PS1’s round-up of robotic sculptures by this Mexican artist spans two decades and provides a excellent introduction to his body of work, which references the past, civilizational glories of Mexico’s indigenous people while commenting on their current travails, which include violations of their human and land rights by the Mexican government.

Advertising
Wilhelm von Gloeden, Untitled, 1895-1900
Photograph: Courtesy Shin Gallery
Art, Contemporary art

“Oscar Wilde and Wilhelm von Gloeden: Marvellous Boys”

icon-location-pin Lower East Side
icon-calendar

Works by two prominent and mutually admiring figures of 19th-century gay culture—the Irish writer, Oscar Wilde (1854-1909), and the German photographer Wilhelm von Gloeden (1856-1931)—are brought together in a show that meditates upon the intersection of homoeroticism, classical antiquity and the desire for eternal youth. Von Gloeden’s pastoral nudes of young men scantily accessorized with Greco-Roman motifs (laurel wreathes, togas, amphorae), taken during the artist’s 1877 sojourn to Sicily, are presented alongside a copy of Wilde’s only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, in which the titular gentleman, in a sort of deal with the devil, remains forever young while his portrait ages in his stead.

Installation view of Matthew Morrocco, "Orchid: RGB" at Pioneer Works
Photograph: Courtesy Pioneer Works
Art, Contemporary art

Matthew Morrocco, “Orchid: RGB”

icon-location-pin Red Hook
icon-calendar

Queer identity is given a formalist gloss in these photos featuring figures clad Spiderman-like in full-body stockings representing hues on the color spectrum in an homage to Ellsworth’s Kelly painting series on the same subject.

Advertising
Roman Tolici, Homo Deus, 2018
Photograph: Courtesy VACATION
Art, Contemporary art

“Homo Deus”

icon-location-pin Lower East Side
icon-calendar

Timeshare space VACATION welcomes Mobius Gallery from Bucharest, Romania, which is presenting this group show of seven Eastern European artist. Taking it’s title from Israeli author Yuval Noah Harari's 2016 tome, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, the exhibit focuses on the book’s themes, which include the idea that technological change in the 21st-century will permit humanity to attain godlike powers, including the ability to indefinitely extend life. This notion—along with Harari's contention that human beings are simply algorithms, reducible to code in a way that gives lie to the humanist concept of the self—informs the works here, which takes a mostly dim if resigned view of a future that seems inevitable.

Find more art events this week

Looking for more art exhibits?

Advertising