The best movies out right now

Find the latest reviews for movies playing in New York this week, including critics' picks and box office winners

Deadpool 2

Looking for a movie to see tonight or this weekend? Check out our lineup of the best movies out right now, reviewed by Time Out New York critics. Click on a listing for full reviews, trailers and showtimes. Or consult our weekly curated list of the best movie screenings in NYC for more!

The best movies now playing

1

Hereditary

5 out of 5 stars

Never take pity on a film critic. Instead, let it suffice to say that I look forward to you seeing 'Hereditary' and then joining me in having several sleepless nights peering into dark corners and gnawing your fingernails off. A harrowing story of unthinkable family tragedy that veers into the realm of the supernatural, 'Hereditary' takes its place as a new generation's 'The Exorcist' — for some, it will spin heads even more savagely. As with so much inspired horror, from 'Rosemary's Baby' to 2014's psychologically acute 'The Babadook', the movie gets its breath and a palpable sense of unraveling identity from a fearless female performance, this time by Toni Collette, the revered Australian actor capable of sustained fits of mania. (To watch her in 'The Sixth Sense' or 'Velvet Goldmine' is to only get a taste of how deep she goes here.) Collette plays Annie, an artist who constructs uncannily realistic dioramas: miniature rooms that embody the film's theme of a larger, malevolent entity playing with human toys. We zoom into those rooms, where Annie is keeping it together after the recent death of her by-all-accounts severe mother. Dressed in funeral blacks are her husband, Steve (Gabriel Byrne), her oldest child, Peter (Alex Wolff), a teenage stoner, and distracted young Charlie (the awesomely concentrated Milly Shapiro, a Tony winner for 'Matilda: The Musical'). Something is wrong with Charlie. Every head cock, tongue cluck and eerie stare into the middle distance will hav

2

Ocean’s 8

4 out of 5 stars

A cooler-than-thou band of criminals, a smoothly executed grand heist, flawless costumes. Expanding on the handsome attributes of the Ocean’s franchise with a radiant cast and sufficient NYC groove, ‘Hunger Games’ director Gary Ross’s ‘Ocean’s 8’ gives glossy multiplex entertainment a good name. Fully loaded with Anne Hathaway’s (often underutilised) comedic chops – her cunning movie-star character is the film’s secret weapon – and various high-profile cameos (Heidi Klum, Anna Wintour, Kim Kardashian, you name it), it packs in ample carats of glitz beyond its diamonds and sequinned designer gowns.Sandra Bullock plays Debbie Ocean, an ex-con proudly filling the shoes of her brother Danny (George Clooney, here only in spirit). She masterminds a complex scheme to steal a majestic Cartier necklace at New York’s elite fundraiser the Met Gala. Among her recruits are former associate Lou (an impeccably-suited Cate Blanchett) and the eccentric fashion designer Rose Weil (Helena Bonham Carter), who’s yearning to resurrect her waning career by dressing the impishly seductive Daphne Kluger (Hathaway) for the exclusive event. Also in the squad are Mindy Kaling’s jewellery connoisseur, Sarah Paulson’s Vogue insider, Awkwafina’s sly con and the ultra-charismatic hacker Nine Ball (Rihanna, like you’ve never seen before.)‘Ocean’s 8’ sticks to the formula, though Ross never quite matches the breezy vigour of the Soderbergh-directed trilogy, but the jokes land and there’s a satisfying twist to

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3

Won’t You Be My Neighbor

4 out of 5 stars

With its focus on Fred Rogers, the children’s television host who extolled the virtues of positivity, Won’t You Be My Neighbor? is undeniably well timed. It doesn’t have to strain at all for immediate relevance. Early in Morgan Neville’s heartfelt, moving documentary, we see scenes from one of the first episodes of Misterogers’ Neighborhood (as it was spelled at the time) in which puppet character King Friday XIII builds a wall to keep out those he finds undesirable, before kindness brings it down again. This segment of low-budget ’60s TV carries a message we need now more than ever. If it seems egregious to approach Rogers and his show with a political reading, Won’t You Be My Neighbor? may surprise even those who grew up watching the series, with its revelation of the many world events and concerns it addressed. In his gentle, empathetic way, Rogers helped little ones deal with everything from Vietnam to 9/11. After Robert Kennedy was gunned down, one puppet’s plea for a definition of “assassination” was compassionately answered. Rogers was devoted to the innocence of childhood, but he also knew there was no way to shield kids from the ugliness of the adult world. He offered a calm, reassuring buffer to it. Neville shone a spotlight on under-celebrated talent in his Oscar-winning 20 Feet from Stardom, and here he paints an equally compassionate portrait of one of American popular culture’s most familiar faces. Through interviews with those who knew Rogers (and vintage on-

4

Incredibles 2

4 out of 5 stars

Superheroes may save the world, but parenthood requires skills far more advanced than extendable limbs. Brad Bird’s Incredibles 2—Pixar’s most spirited sequel since Toy Story 3—lovingly expresses this certainty through a bighearted familial portrait wrapped in ’60s-inspired design. But the film’s disarming appeal lies in its simpler moments of domesticity, in which the members of the all-superhero Parr family lift each other up and fight for relevance in a world of indifference. Still underground with criminalized superpowers and a destroyed home, Mr. Incredible (Craig T. Nelson), Elastigirl (Holly Hunter), and their children, Violet, Dash and the explosive baby Jack-Jack, quietly live in a dingy motel. Their luck turns when a pair of wealthy siblings—the naive Winston and brainy inventor Evelyn (Bob Odenkirk and Catherine Keener)—offer them a chance to restore the Supers’ reputation. While the sensible Elastigirl serves as the fearless face of the mission, Mr. Incredible hilariously Mr. Moms his way through the kids’ homework, boy troubles and newly emerging superpowers. When the state-of-the-art villain Screenslaver disturbs the picture, the entire crew, including the previous film’s charismatic ice maker Frozone (Samuel L. Jackson), joins the good fight. Incredibles 2 comes supercharged with timely, sophisticated themes around societal apathy and gender parity. While slightly overplotted in its finale, the sleek sequel still glows with grown-up wit, with craft and humor

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6

Sweet Country

4 out of 5 stars

An Aboriginal man accused of murder goes on the run in Warwick Thornton’s glorious Outback Western.

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7

Isle of Dogs

4 out of 5 stars

Wes Anderson’s second piece of stop-motion animation after Fantastic Mr. Fox brings the quirk (naturally), but weds it to a timely story of refugee camaraderie.

8

Annihilation

4 out of 5 stars

Natalie Portman squares off against an alien presence in a rare example of Hollywood sci-fi-horror thoughtfulness.

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9

Black Panther

4 out of 5 stars

Surprising at every turn, Marvel’s new spinoff throws shade at the white-bread business of blockbustering.

10

Paddington 2

5 out of 5 stars

This bearish sequel will leave you with a heart so warmed, you could trek across the Antarctic in shorts.

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Box-office top 10

1

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

3 out of 5 stars

This fun, pacy addition to the dino disaster franchise doesn’t do much that’s particularly new – though what it does, it does with a fair whack of panache. That’s largely thanks to gifted Spanish director JA Bayona, who brings to bear the macabre touches that made ‘The Orphanage’ such a spooky treat. Short of bringing Mr DNA back as a flesh-craving zombie, ‘Fallen Kingdom’ is as close as the ‘Jurassic’ movies are going to come to a horror film and it gels nicely with a franchise that’s always had a gleefully sadistic streak. It’s at its most fun when things (limbs, mainly) are going bump in the dark in a third act that pays homage to classic horror films. Kicking off where ‘Jurassic World’ left off, we find cloning corporation InGen picking up the pieces after the catastrophic collapse of its dinosaur park. Not only is Isla Nubla now overrun with prehistoric critters, the island’s dormant volcano is erupting – seriously, were there no islands without volcanos? – and about to make them all extinct again. Cue dino rights activist Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard, swapping the heels for boots this time) and wisecracking raptor trainer Owen Grady (Chris Pratt) to help with the seemingly suicidal rescue mission and share some feisty chemistry. Jeff Goldblum’s Dr Ian Malcolm returns with doomy warnings about where all this Dino Lives Matter fervour will lead.   There’s more than an echo of ‘Jurassic Park: Lost World’ in all this, right down to the gnarly and extremely edible m

2

Incredibles 2

4 out of 5 stars

Superheroes may save the world, but parenthood requires skills far more advanced than extendable limbs. Brad Bird’s 'Incredibles 2' – Pixar’s most spirited sequel since 'Toy Story 3' – lovingly expresses this certainty through a bighearted familial portrait wrapped in ’60s-inspired design. But the film’s disarming appeal lies in its simpler moments of domesticity, in which the members of the all-superhero Parr family lift each other up and fight for relevance in a world of indifference. Still underground with criminalised superpowers and a destroyed home, Mr. Incredible (Craig T. Nelson), Elastigirl (Holly Hunter), and their children, Violet, Dash and the explosive baby Jack-Jack, quietly live in a dingy motel. Their luck turns when a pair of wealthy siblings – the naive Winston and brainy inventor Evelyn (Bob Odenkirk and Catherine Keener) – offer them a chance to restore the Supers’ reputation. While the sensible Elastigirl serves as the fearless face of the mission, Mr. Incredible hilariously Mr. Moms his way through the kids’ homework, boy troubles and newly emerging superpowers. When the state-of-the-art villain Screenslaver disturbs the picture, the entire crew, including the previous film’s charismatic ice maker Frozone (Samuel L. Jackson), joins the good fight. 'Incredibles 2' comes supercharged with timely, sophisticated themes around societal apathy and gender parity. While slightly overplotted in its finale, the sleek sequel still glows with grown-up wit, with cr

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3

Ocean’s 8

4 out of 5 stars

A cooler-than-thou band of criminals, a smoothly executed grand heist, flawless costumes. Expanding on the handsome attributes of the Ocean’s franchise with a radiant cast and sufficient NYC groove, ‘Hunger Games’ director Gary Ross’s ‘Ocean’s 8’ gives glossy multiplex entertainment a good name. Fully loaded with Anne Hathaway’s (often underutilised) comedic chops – her cunning movie-star character is the film’s secret weapon – and various high-profile cameos (Heidi Klum, Anna Wintour, Kim Kardashian, you name it), it packs in ample carats of glitz beyond its diamonds and sequinned designer gowns.Sandra Bullock plays Debbie Ocean, an ex-con proudly filling the shoes of her brother Danny (George Clooney, here only in spirit). She masterminds a complex scheme to steal a majestic Cartier necklace at New York’s elite fundraiser the Met Gala. Among her recruits are former associate Lou (an impeccably-suited Cate Blanchett) and the eccentric fashion designer Rose Weil (Helena Bonham Carter), who’s yearning to resurrect her waning career by dressing the impishly seductive Daphne Kluger (Hathaway) for the exclusive event. Also in the squad are Mindy Kaling’s jewellery connoisseur, Sarah Paulson’s Vogue insider, Awkwafina’s sly con and the ultra-charismatic hacker Nine Ball (Rihanna, like you’ve never seen before.)‘Ocean’s 8’ sticks to the formula, though Ross never quite matches the breezy vigour of the Soderbergh-directed trilogy, but the jokes land and there’s a satisfying twist to

4

Tag

2 out of 5 stars

A movie about a group of male buddies who’ve been playing a one-month-a-year game of tag well into adulthood had numerous possibilities: a madcap chase caper, a heartfelt comedy celebrating the power of friendship, a reflection on the manchild syndrome. Tag tries to be a little bit of everything, and the strain shows; it winds up being another symptom of what’s proving to be a long cinematic Hangover, complete with Ed Helms in the lead. Inspired by a true account reported in The Wall Street Journal, ‘Tag’ opens with Helms nostalgically voice-overing his youthful self and his pals bonding through their ongoing game. Years later, they’ve grown up to be the expected types: the married man (Helms), the CEO (Jon Hamm), the burnout (Jake Johnson), and the nerdy guy (Hannibal Buress). Then there’s Jerry (Jeremy Renner), who for all this time has demonstrated an almost supernatural ability to avoid being ‘it’. When the rest of the group learn he’s getting married, they go on a no-holds-barred quest to finally tag him. A curious Journal writer (Annabelle Wallis) and Helms’s wife (Isla Fisher) join them, solely in the interest of cast diversity; Wallis, in particular, disappears for undue stretches of screen time. Renner’s ‘Bourne’-esque strategies to avoid getting tagged generate the biggest laughs, amidst a predictable series of complications and profanities that lead to equally expected sentimentality and life lessons in the final act. Closing-credits footage of the real-life play

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5

Deadpool 2

2 out of 5 stars

If you haven’t seen the first movie, which charted how gonzo mercenary Wade Wilson became Deadpool, good luck following this equally violent and potty-mouthed sequel. With its torrent of butt-foonery and CG viscera spliced with self-commentary and several hundred in-jokes, it’s seriously unforgiving of latecomers. If you’re not a fan, you may as well be living in a cave. And not the Batcave, obviously. It kicks off with Ryan Reynolds’s super-antihero blowing himself sky high. His fiancée, Vanessa (Morena Baccarin), has been killed while he was taking down another batch of faceless goons and, grief-stricken, he’s attempting to end it all. Being indestructible, this proves tricky, though it does allow for a brief meeting with Vanessa in the afterlife where he learns that finding his heart is the key to being permanently reunited. It’s so un-‘Deadpool’, you almost expect cinema’s most notorious fourth-wall-breaker to call a halt to proceeding and declare it a joke. Instead, the movie toes an unconvincing line between sweary glibness and sentiment as Deadpool tries to protect Julian Dennison’s (‘Hunt for the Wilderpeople’) orphaned misfit from Josh Brolin’s terminator-from-the-future, Cable. The action comes thick and extremely fast, too. Director David Leitch (‘John Wick’, ‘Atomic Blonde’) presides over swathes of deafening, frenetically edited sequences: things explode, stuff flips. Sometimes things flip and explode at the same time. Reynolds, who birthed this surprise hit f

6

Solo: A Star Wars Story

3 out of 5 stars

You definitely wouldn’t have bet your spaceship on this Han Solo spin-off movie being anything other than a hunk of junk. The ditching of original directors Chris Miller and Phil Lord (‘21 Jump Street’) – which was well published and just shy of acrimonious – only complicated the already onerous task of bringing a new take on the beloved Harrison Ford character to the screen. Somehow, though, the pair’s replacement, Ron Howard, has come through with a frisky space caper that zips along like a speeder on a bed of air. It’s far from perfect, but it’s much better than it has any right to be. It opens back in the streetwise early days of Han (Alden Ehrenreich) in the ‘putrid sewer’ of his home planet Corellia, before skipping forward, via a hair-raising stint in the Imperial army, to a team-up with a colourful band of thieves led by Woody Harrelson’s Tobias Beckett and his wife Val (Thandie Newton). Their first heist involves boosting starship fuel at the behest of sinister playboy Dryden Vos (a scene-stealing Paul Bettany, bearing scars like he’s just faceplanted a waffle iron). The sequence is a rush, and the first of a few reminders that the man who made ‘Apollo 13’ knows how to cut between outer space action and claustrophobic cockpits. And what of the main man? Ehrenreich makes a solid fist of emulating Ford without ever quite matching Ford’s easy cool or jaded worldview. Does he feel anything like Ford’s Solo? Not really, though the film never pauses long enough to let you

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7

Hereditary

5 out of 5 stars

Never take pity on a film critic. Instead, let it suffice to say that I look forward to you seeing 'Hereditary' and then joining me in having several sleepless nights peering into dark corners and gnawing your fingernails off. A harrowing story of unthinkable family tragedy that veers into the realm of the supernatural, 'Hereditary' takes its place as a new generation's 'The Exorcist' — for some, it will spin heads even more savagely. As with so much inspired horror, from 'Rosemary's Baby' to 2014's psychologically acute 'The Babadook', the movie gets its breath and a palpable sense of unraveling identity from a fearless female performance, this time by Toni Collette, the revered Australian actor capable of sustained fits of mania. (To watch her in 'The Sixth Sense' or 'Velvet Goldmine' is to only get a taste of how deep she goes here.) Collette plays Annie, an artist who constructs uncannily realistic dioramas: miniature rooms that embody the film's theme of a larger, malevolent entity playing with human toys. We zoom into those rooms, where Annie is keeping it together after the recent death of her by-all-accounts severe mother. Dressed in funeral blacks are her husband, Steve (Gabriel Byrne), her oldest child, Peter (Alex Wolff), a teenage stoner, and distracted young Charlie (the awesomely concentrated Milly Shapiro, a Tony winner for 'Matilda: The Musical'). Something is wrong with Charlie. Every head cock, tongue cluck and eerie stare into the middle distance will hav

8

Superfly

Superfly - the film that helped define a genre in its characters, look, sound, and feel - is reimagined with Director X, director of legendary music videos (Drake, Rihanna), introducing it to a new generation. The screenplay is by Alex Tse.

Release date: Friday September 14 2018
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9

Avengers: Infinity War

3 out of 5 stars

First, a bit of prophecy spoken by an evil mastermind in 2004’s ‘The Incredibles’: ‘And when everyone’s super… no one will be.’ Welcome to that endgame achieved: Marvel’s ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ – an overstuffed sausage of summer entertainment – is the ‘Ocean’s Thirteen’ of spandexed heroism, if you can imagine a version of that movie with two times as many Brad Pitts and no poker dealers. Combining the casts of 'The Avengers’, ‘Black Panther’, ‘Doctor Strange’ and ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ may have sounded like genius alchemy to studio scientists who think of filmgoing as one-stop shopping. But in practice, it results in a stream of in-fighting for alpha-dog dominance, everyone trying to make what amounts to a cameo stick. ‘There’s an ant man and a spider-man?’ asks Mark Ruffalo’s exasperated Bruce Banner – and that’s before you’ve made him Hulk-angry. Aptly titled, the nearly three-hour ‘Infinity War’ pours on the action – some of it grandly operatic, some of it breezy and fun – but mainly, it’s about a big purple goon on a bling quest. Genocidal Thanos (Josh Brolin, ready to grumble) hopes to collect six Infinity Stones for his Pandora bracelet and thereby enact a purge of ‘half of humanity’. Helpfully, the script does this for him: Depopulated New York City streets and the near-abstract grasslands of fictional Wakanda are perfect settings for battles with zero collateral damage—and zero human emotional stakes. In their place, we get showdowns over tactics: Asgardian bro

10

Won’t You Be My Neighbor

4 out of 5 stars

With its focus on Fred Rogers, the children’s television host who extolled the virtues of positivity, Won’t You Be My Neighbor? is undeniably well timed. It doesn’t have to strain at all for immediate relevance. Early in Morgan Neville’s heartfelt, moving documentary, we see scenes from one of the first episodes of Misterogers’ Neighborhood (as it was spelled at the time) in which puppet character King Friday XIII builds a wall to keep out those he finds undesirable, before kindness brings it down again. This segment of low-budget ’60s TV carries a message we need now more than ever. If it seems egregious to approach Rogers and his show with a political reading, Won’t You Be My Neighbor? may surprise even those who grew up watching the series, with its revelation of the many world events and concerns it addressed. In his gentle, empathetic way, Rogers helped little ones deal with everything from Vietnam to 9/11. After Robert Kennedy was gunned down, one puppet’s plea for a definition of “assassination” was compassionately answered. Rogers was devoted to the innocence of childhood, but he also knew there was no way to shield kids from the ugliness of the adult world. He offered a calm, reassuring buffer to it. Neville shone a spotlight on under-celebrated talent in his Oscar-winning 20 Feet from Stardom, and here he paints an equally compassionate portrait of one of American popular culture’s most familiar faces. Through interviews with those who knew Rogers (and vintage on-

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New in theaters this week

Sicario: Day of the Soldado

3 out of 5 stars

Sicario, the grisly 2015 narco-thriller about an FBI agent on a black ops mission in Mexico, combined slam-bang action with PhD-smart analysis of the moral ambiguities of America’s war on drugs. Now here’s a sequel, missing key players: actor Emily Blunt, director Denis Villeneuve (Blade Runner 2049) and cinematographer Roger Deakins have all bailed. Sicario 2 is decent enough, but you can’t deny the weapons-grade star power is gone. We’re back on the Mexico-US border where the drug cartels have upped the ante: now they’re trafficking Islamic terrorists alongside immigrants. (In a horrible scene at the start a suicide bomber blocks the door of a supermarket in Kansas City while a woman clutching a little girl begs him not to detonate his bomb.) Josh Brolin is CIA agent Matt Graver. He may look like a stoner dude, but Graver is the guy the US government calls to do its dirty work on foreign soil. His response to the terrorist attack is to plot the kidnap of a Mexican cartel boss’s teen daughter and start a gang war. Director Stefano Sollima (TV’s Gomorrah) and writer Taylor Sheridan bring authentic-feeling details to the film and we get more Benicio del Toro as Alejandro, the prosecutor-turned-assassin determined to avenge the murder of his family. Del Toro is the Ernest Hemingway of screen badasses: the less he says the better he is—he does his most convincing work while looking like he’s about to nod off. Sicario 2 sets up a future installment centered on him: that sequel

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Leave No Trace

4 out of 5 stars

Two people—a man and his teen daughter—adopting a simpler life in the backwoods of America may sound like the beginnings of a Bon Iver concept album, but in the hands of co-writer/director Debra Granik (Winter’s Bone), it forms the crux of a smart, heartfelt examination of outsiderdom in a society that doesn’t just prize conformity, but demands it. For a small story, it tackles some pretty big themes, gauging America’s reactionary social climate through the eyes of father Will (Ben Foster) and his daughter Tom (Thomasin McKenzie), living outdoors in the misty Oregon rainforest.  Like a Bear Grylls family outing spun wildly out of control, the pair forage for food, nursing fuel supplies and essentials scrapped together with money Will makes selling painkilling meds to fellow veterans. As the title implies, the duo is ever-wary of betraying their presence to the authorities. It’s a hardscrabble rural existence that’ll be semi-familiar to anyone who’s seen Granik’s Ozarks-set drama Winter’s Bone, although here there’s an element of choice and, initially, an air of quiet satisfaction at sticking it to The Man. Of course, it doesn’t last: they’re soon sucked back into the system and processed by social workers whose uncomprehending kindnesses only rub salt in the wounds.   Unlike Sean Penn’s Into the Wild, another film that explores the quiet radicalism of disappearing off the grid, there’s no big emotional swells here. Leave No Trace is a more hushed, contemplative movie. Grani

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Woman Walks Ahead

Based on true events, "Woman Walks Ahead" tells the story of Catherine Weldon (JESSICA CHASTAIN), a widowed artist from New York who, in the 1880s, traveled alone to North Dakota to paint a portrait of Chief Sitting Bull (MICHAEL GREYEYES). Her arrival at Standing Rock is welcomed with open hostility by a US Army officer (SAM ROCKWELL), who has stationed troops around the Lakota reservation to undermine Native American claims to the land. As Catherine and Sitting Bull grow closer, and as their friendship and his life are threatened by imperious government forces, Catherine must contend with the violence that underlies her position.

Dark River

3 out of 5 stars

You wait ages for a hard-hitting drama set in northern England’s rugged Yorkshire Dales, then two come along almost at once. Unlike in last year’s God’s Own Country, love is in short supply in a homecoming fable that British writer-director Clio Barnard juices for every drop of quiet anguish. Sensitively depicting the psychic scars of domestic abuse, only a frustratingly abrupt final act leaves it falling short of Barnard’s remarkable previous work. We meet farmhand Alice (Ruth Wilson) proficiently shearing sheep, but soon she’s heading back to her childhood farm after the death of her dad. Awaiting her is long-estranged brother Joe (Mark Stanley), who’s only half running the place and self-medicating with liquor. Alice has a legitimate claim to this rusting collection of barns, but he’s not giving them up without a fight. The pair sparks ferociously off each other, as the root cause of their troubles—an abusive dad (the ever-doomed Sean Bean, dead before the film is barely underway this time)—is glimpsed in flashbacks. The farmhouse is haunted with bad memories but for Alice, the allure of home is strong. It’s kitchen-sink meets sheep-dipper: a nightmare nestled inside a rural idyll. Full of gruff exchanges and bursts of rage, Barnard’s script coils like a fuse towards a bundle of TNT that never quite detonates. It’s essentially an intimate two-hander: Wilson and Stanley bring such vulnerability and sympathy to their characters, you’re left wanting more. It’s heartbreakin

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Custody

4 out of 5 stars

A father-son drama for anyone who finds There Will Be Blood too cozy in its depiction of paternal love, Custody is a bleakly intimate and terrifically sad look at a splintered family in freefall. The only thing that isn’t moving about French director Xavier Legrand’s depiction of a bitter custody battle is the eerily still camera keeping its characters under a steady gaze. It’s unblinking in a Dardenne-ish way and often hard to watch, with the emotional toll playing on its characters’ faces. The ending is a floorer too. Legrand has spun out his own Oscar-nominated short, Just Before Losing Everything, into a domestic drama that boils with pain and anger. Reprising their roles are Léa Drucker and Denis Ménochet as a couple tussling for custody of 11-year-old Julien (Thomas Gloria). Their daughter (Mathilde Auneveux), on the cusp of adulthood, has a chance to escape the shadow of their abusive, needy dad. The spiky, sensitive Julien isn’t so lucky, forced to spend afternoons in his lunkish father’s almost comically small van.  Once a child actor himself, Legrand coaxes a heartbreaking turn from Gloria as a kid trapped in an impossible situation. His father, despite claiming to be a reformed character, is clearly a ticking time-bomb. Mum is simply fraught. You’re left wondering how the courts could have let this combustible situation happen. Maybe just this once, society is to blame. 

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Comments

11 comments
Aravind G


You are so interesting! I don't believe I've truly read through anything like that before. So wonderful to discover another person with a few unique thoughts on this issue. Seriously.. many thanks for starting this up. This website is something that is required on the internet, someone with a bit of originality!

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pabuzesi l

Wonder Woman is brilliant. The performance of the lead actress is just amazing. The director dealt it really well. I watched it 3 days back and loved it. I am going to watch this with my kids on my onebox A great way to watch movies and Tv shows that you missed is by onebox app (https://oneboxhd.org). We can install it on Android phones and Smart Tvs.

Roger D

So.. I'm a bit offended by the comment "shake off the post- election blues.. implying that I am down and out as a result of the great "45" Mr. Trump

Ondra P

www.youtubemovies.eu

Tyler M

A lot of these movies sound really good. I have been looking for something to go watch for my brother's birthday when he comes in town on Saturday. I'll see if he wants to see any of these when he's here. I'm sure we could find something good.

Tamy L

@Tyler M You should check other review sites. Most of these movies got so so reviews.

Jason Krawczyk

My movie "The Briefcase" was recently released and I was hoping your site would be interested in reviewing it. I can send you a copy of the DVD or direct you to a link for viewing. Thank you, big fan of the site, and keep up the good work. http://everyonequestion.com/the-briefcase-release-date Title: The Briefcase Writer/Director: Jason Krawczyk/me Genre: Crime/Comedy Runtime: 80 minutes Stars: Kip Pardue, Vincent Pastor, Keith Nobbs thebriefcasemovie.com