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These New York restaurants have temporarily become grocery stores

Butcher's Bodega
Photography: Courtesy of Butcher's Daughter

Even before the state mandated last week that non-essential workers stay home, New Yorkers were already stocking up for the coronavirus quarantine. It was nearly impossible to find basics like eggs, dry pasta and frozen vegetables, among other things at many supermarkets and bodegas—forget about toilet paper and hand sanitizer.

Luckily, delivery and takeout is still an option at many restaurants and bars (including alcohol to go), but there’s still only so much of that our bank accounts can handle. It’s a safe bet to say more of us are cooking (or at least upping our home bar game) than ever before. Now, there’s another option for shopping as some restaurants morph into temporary corner stores selling everything from produce and condiments to noodles and yes, even hard-to-find toilet paper.

For these restaurants, however, the new service is another revenue stream at a challenging time for the hospitality industry. You’ll be supporting a store and a restaurant at the same time—just do it six-feet apart from other customers.

The Clam Community Fish Market

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From 11am-7pm daily, The Clam is now operating as The Clam Community Fish Market with Early Morning Seafood, which has been a longtime purveyor for the West Village favorite known as a seafood lover’s haven. The quality of the seafood will be better than anything you find at grocery stores across the city and is also discounted (halibut is sold at $10 for a 6-oz. filet and oysters are $1 each). There will be daily specials announced on Instagram but you can also call Chef Mikey during store hours at 212-242-7420 to place an order. Sauces, spices and wine to-go (at 30 percent off) are also being sold—at a proper distance, of course.

Butcher’s Bodega

Butcher's Bodega

Photography: Courtesy of Butcher's Daughter

Butcher’s Daughter was one of the early trendsetters in the all-day café craze with its juices, veggie-focused menu and Instagram-friendly vibes. Now it’s been temporarily transformed into Butcher’s Bodegas offering produce, basic pantry items and miraculously, toilet paper and hand sanitizer. Hours are 9am-9pm daily with delivery available until 9pm pickup available until 8pm.

Cafe Alula

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This Lebanese-inspired cafe is selling bread from the popular She Wolf Bakery as well as pita from its window. If your sweet tooth has a hankering, there are cakes and cookies for sale, too. They open until about 6 or 7pm daily.

Hill Country Barbecue Market

Hill Country Barbecue Market

Photography: Courtesy of Hill Country Barbecue Market

A longtime favorite amongst barbecue fans, Hill Country was always more popular for its barbecue than the market part of its name. While the restaurant’s dining room is closed, you can buy meats, sausage, fresh produce and even adult beverages to go in the temporary market (if you don't feel like cooking, prepared meals are available for takeout). They’re also offering a “No Touch Drop-Off/Pick Up” option to be extra cautious.

Greenpoint Fish & Lobster

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Some of the most pristine seafood in the city is served at this Brooklyn favorite (also featured on our EAT List, aka the best 100 restaurants in New York City). While you won’t be able to sit down for a lobster roll or a dozen oysters, there will be plenty of fresh seafood on sale daily from noon-7pm.

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