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KANF HO DONG BAEKJEONG prime boneless short rib
Photograph: Paul WagtouiczPrime boneless short rib at Kang Ho Dong Baekjeong

The 14 best Korean BBQ restaurants in NYC

Light the fires for the best Korean BBQ in NYC at the city's finest do-it-yourself Asian meat meccas

Written by
Julien Levy
Written by
Abbe Baker
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Of all the amazing restaurants in New York City, the ones specializing in Korean barbecue are particularly fun, and the interactive, DIY experience is even more ideal in a group setting. The restaurants with the best Korean BBQ in NYC serve up fresh, delicate meats with tingly seasonings and sauces that you can cook exactly to your liking.

From Koreatown to Flushing and beyond, you’ll find many examples of top notch Korean BBQ. Whether you’re looking for a swanky experience or something more low-key, these spots come through with all the standards, hot pots and family-style dishes that Korean BBQ is known for.

If you’re in the mood for a different type of Asian cuisine, be sure to check out our guides to the best Thai, Chinese and Japanese fare. But don’t miss the unique dining experience that is Korean BBQ in NYC.

RECOMMENDED: Find more of the best restaurants in NYC 

Best Korean BBQ in NYC

  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • Flatiron
  • price 3 of 4

Chef David Shim and restaurateur Simon Kim bring beefy bona-fides to bear at Cote, self-dubbed New York City’s first Korean Steakhouse. Considering the ubiquity of quality of both beef and cookery at many well-established Korean restaurants, the claim calls the definition of ‘steakhouse’ into question. Semantics aside, Cote is an unequivocally beautiful restaurant on every level–a graceful execution of vision and mission. As expected, the world’s first and only Michelin-starred Korean barbecue establishment does indeed distinguish itself with expertly-sourced ingredients, refined ambiance, a quality wine-list, and overall precision. Whether or not it’s what you picture when someone says “Korean barbecue” or “steakhouse,” it’s one of the best restaurants in the city.

  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • Midtown East
  • price 2 of 4

On first glance, the Manhattan outpost of the popular namesake chainlet from larger-than-life Korean personality Kang Ho Dong, professional wrestler turned comedian, looks like utter chaos. Despite the noise and crowd, the cooking speaks of a quiet refinement. Executive chef Mike Sim employs steakhouse-style quality control, wet-aging his Omaha beef for three weeks before servers showcase the carne in escalating degrees of flavor and heft.

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  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • Sunnyside
  • price 3 of 4

K-pop blasts through the speakers as crowds chow down on family-style plates at this wood-clad, 1970s aesthetic Korean restaurant. You can find standard dishes—including barbecued meats marinated in a spicy house sauce and a pan-fried seafood pancake—but the joint's known for its raw plates. Try the gochujang oysters or hot pot, a fiery broth packed with still-squirming octopus, lobster, clam and shrimp. 

  • Restaurants
  • Midtown West
  • price 2 of 4

Located on the 39th floor of a Koreatown skyscraper, this sleek eatery offers some amazing sights of a twinkling skyline through its wraparound windows. The cooking, it turns out, is spectacular, too. The kitchen highlights grade-A ingredients and upscale presentations. Tabletop barbecue is the focus, with an unusually large roster of proteins including thick duck breast pieces, jumbo white shrimp, tender boneless short ribs (galbi) and pork belly.

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  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • Midtown West

Importing a venerable KBBQ tradition from the beaches of Busan to the northern reaches of K-Town, owner Bobby Yoon applies his grandfather’s proprietary meat slicing technique to the cuts you only think you know. While some KBBQ locations whose din and bustle make the meal feel like a party featuring grilled meat, Yoon Haeundae Galbi is a more intimate affair. The seafood tteokbokki is a spicy spectacular not to be missed, but the star here is the Haeundae clan’s claim to fame: fresh short rib, tender and juicy beyond imagining. Reservations are a must, so plan accordingly.

Don’s Bogam BBQ & Wine Bar
  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • Midtown East
  • price 2 of 4

Fire up the grill at this barbecue and wine bar hybrid. Each table is outfitted with barbecue burner, and servers will not only help you navigate the menu but show you how to cook at the table. The signature dish, three-layer pork, is a must-try — the meat has been marinated for 24 hours in wine. But plenty of other Korean chicken, beef and seafood options are available, too, each paired with dipping sauces and banchan.

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  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • Gowanus
  • price 2 of 4

In a former warehouse space in industrial Gowanus, Insa offers a modern take on Korean BBQ, as reinterpreted by Seoul-born chef Sohui Kim. Complimentary banchan (daikon kimchi, steamed egg custard) hit the table first, followed by standout mains like a sweet-and-salty galbijjim stew and marinated yangnyeom galbi, to DIY. The extensive cocktail menu offers a booze-addled primer into Korean BBQ, including large-format punch bowls to share among friends.

  • Restaurants
  • Midtown West

Love is what you get when you mix KBBQ and a nightclub: a hit parade of table-grilled fare, classic Korean dishes, and DJ-spun tunes for your vibing pleasure. This spot’s tasty sizzling meats with pulsing beats are priced on the higher end; à la carte BBQ cuts hover in the $40 range with not a ton of other options. Bottle service is on offer in true club form, but mid-shelf liquor runs $200+. Your wait may be long if you didn’t plan ahead with a reservation, but if you score a table at Love BBQ, unique among its K-town peers in mission and vibe, this is an experience all its own. 

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You’ll find a timeless, beautiful NYC story told through food, shared cuisine and community in Little Neck, Queens. Not only is the meat at Sung Book Dong truly incredible (pork belly and beef bulgogi are particular standouts) portions are plentiful, and the banchan (featuring marinated crab!) are some of the best anywhere, period. The space is utilitarian, but you’re visiting for a feast first and foremost.  

A glowing neon sign in the window indicates Kum Sung’s specialty: duck. In a field with so much emphasis on beef, this delicious, reasonably-priced departure is a must for any true KBBQ connoisseur and, really, anyone in the market for an unforgettable meal. Fatty, gamey, crisp-skinned BBQ duck is the undisputed star of the show, but the banchan here is amazing and generous. The cold noodles are also a beautifully chewy palate cleanser.

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  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • Midtown West
  • price 2 of 4

Come to this Koreatown stalwart with a hearty appetite. Included banchan hits the table as soon as you're seated and the traditional Korean fare keeps coming: bubbling tofu stew, variations of bibimbap, and plenty of meats for your grill-it-yourself BBQ. Once you've had your fill, a piping-hot cup of cinnamon tea arrives with the check.

  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • Midtown West
  • price 3 of 4

The first U.S. export from South Korean chain Jongro BBQ, this barbeque spot on the second floor of a K-Town office building evokes old-school Seoul with vintage signs and movie posters, but the real star here is the meat. The beef platter includes a selection of marinated cuts of ribeye, skirt steak, short rib and chuck cooked tabletop and served with banchan.

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  • Restaurants
  • Barbecue
  • Midtown East

Diners seem to speak in hushed tones in this dimly-lit space, sleek with dark wood-paneled walls and ceremonial brassware, as pristine slices of A5 Wagyu arrives at tables. A server grills and cuts all your barbecue meats, which you can pair with expertly-premared pots of cooked rice with sea urchin and truffle.

  • Restaurants
  • Midtown West

Touting themselves as an innovator of Korean barbecue, the focus of this bustling K-Town favorite is the mighty rib. And that’s precisely what you’ll get, ribs of all kinds: beef galbi, marinated boneless pork galbi, and slowly braised beef rib stew, for starters. Other sensational dishes include the Army casserole with ramen, kimchi, spam, hot dogs and bacon, bulgogi, as well as grilled Chilean sea bass served in a tangy Korean bean paste glaze. 

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