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The best new restaurants in NYC for October 2019

From a popular Egyptian spot to a barbecue hit, October is an ideal time to eat at the best new restaurants NYC offers

Otaku Katsu
Photograph: Johnny Vo
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Before the holidays arrive, October is the perfect time to take advantage of the most anticipated fall restaurant openings. Whether you’re looking for the best brunch or best dessert in NYC, there are plenty of delicious options. This month, we’re excited (and hungry) for cuisines not often found in New York, from Egyptian to Palestinian food, as well as the crowd pleasers like barbecue and ice cream. Fall really is the best time to dine in New York. For more of the best new restaurants to keep on your radar, keep an eye on our fall preview because a few of these spots are opening up soon.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

Best new restaurants NYC

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Photograph: Evan Sung
Restaurants, Seafood

Canal Street Oysters

icon-location-pin Tribeca
  1. This 200-seat restaurant reminds us of Grand Central Oyster Bar, but updated for 2019. In this airy space, you can order from a seafood-centric selection of raw-bar favorites, as well as hot dishes that pair well with craft beers and natural wines.
2
Curry42
Photograph: Courtesy Curry42 at 8SIA
Restaurants, Food court

8SIA

icon-location-pin Midtown

From Malaysian curries to Shanghainese street food, 8sia will be a food hall focused on Asian street food. Yaso, the team behind the market, just opened Yaso Noodle in the West Village, but here you’ll also find a teas, sushi, waffles and other street food bites.

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3
Il Fiorista
Photograph: Courtesy of Il Fiorista
Restaurants

Il Fiorista

icon-location-pin Flatiron

This restaurant’s name translates to “The Florist” in Italian and is all about creative dishes that showcases flora as edible art on each plate. The evocative space features a mural by celebrated artist Leanne Shapton and fittingly, there’s an attached event space for designing bouquets.

4
Zooba
Photograph: Courtesy of Zooba
Restaurants, Egyptian

Zooba

icon-location-pin Nolita

A new fast-casual chain hailing from Cairo has opening in Nolita, bringing with a menu of Egyptian street food. Though their dishes may look like the hummus and falafel you know, what Zooba offers is entirely different. The chain has come to be known for its ta'ameya, swapping out balls of fried chickpeas for fava beans (in addition to the classic version, Zooba also offers versions with spicy pepper, eggplant and pickled lemon). Instead of hummus you'll find a fava bean dip called bessara.

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5
Marble Dessert Bar
Photograph: Courtesy of Marble Dessert Bar
Restaurants

Marble Dessert Bar

icon-location-pin West Village

Pulling experience from the Shanghai outpost of East Village favorite ChikaLicious (which popularized the dessert-only fine dining format), chefs Eugenio Mauro Pompili and Maya Sittisuntorn opened a prix-fixe dessert spot: courses include strawberry sorbet, yuzu cream and basil agar as well as apple sorbet and mint jelly with pineapple granita. 

6
Qanoon
Photograph: Shinatro Ueyama at Triangle Photography
Restaurants, Mediterranean

Qanoon

icon-location-pin Chelsea

Few New York restaurants specialize in the nuances of Palestinian cuisine. Tarek Daka is using inspiration from having lived on a Middle Eastern farm to serve dishes like makloubeh (a rice dish plated upside down) and muhammara (red walnut dip).

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7
Photograph: Courtesy of Zizi
Restaurants, Mediterranean

Zizi

icon-location-pin Chelsea

When Zizi Limona opened in Williamsburg, it was one of the best Middle Eastern restaurants in New York. The eatery closed its Brooklyn location and is now simply Zizi in its Manhattan digs. Chef Liran Leibman is serving a classic shawarma and newer items like Jerusalem bagels, garbanzo bean tempura and a lamb burger. The restaurant's shakshuka will also make a return to the brunch menu.    

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Otaku Katsu
Photograph: Johnny Vo
Restaurants, Japanese

Otaku Katsu

icon-location-pin Lower East Side

It’s not hard to find katsu sandwiches on menus throughout the city. But a whole restaurant devoted to creative plays on the sandos? We’ll take it. A “BEC” katsu option includes runny egg, bechamel, smoked bacon and swiss cheese, served bento box-style on a bed of rice with pickles and burnt lemon.

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9
Ciao, Gloria
Photograph: Noah Fecks
Restaurants, Bakeries

Ciao, Gloria

icon-location-pin Prospect Heights

Co-founder of the beloved Red Hook bakery Baked, Renato Poliafito, has opened a new concept, this time more Italian-leaning. The pastry menu—pistachio croissants, Sicilian sandwiches and one heck of a pumpkin bread—is best paired with coffee served in ceramics made down the street.

10
Rhodora
Photograph: Liz Clayman
Restaurants

Rhodora

icon-location-pin Fort Greene

At the former site of Mettā—the Fort Greene restaurant that specialized in wood-fired Argentinian cooking—has revamped with a new name and concept at the same space. Now called Rhodora—named after the Ralph Waldo Emerson poem—the new iteration will focus on being an industry leader for sustainability. The Oberon Group (behind other Brooklyn hits like Rucola and June) offer a fairly simple menu of tinned fish, cheeses and a robust wine program, to reduce their carbon footprint. They pledge that they will only source ingredients that can be recycled, upcycled or composted.

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11
Photograph: Sebastian Lucrecio
Restaurants, Japanese

Nami Nori

icon-location-pin West Village

While they all worked at fine dining restaurants across town, Taka Sakaeda and his business partners are offering a much more casual (and affordable) experience here. Temaki hand rolls—filled with everything from scallops to tune poke—can be complemented with Japanese small plates and snacks.

12
Photograph: Damien Lafargue
Bars

Daymoves/ Nightmoves

icon-location-pin Williamsburg

The team behind the beloved wine bar and restaurant Four Horsemen has expanded next door with a new coffee shop, that will turn into a bar called Nightmoves, afterhours. Pastries are provided by Bushwick bakery L’Imprimerie with coffee from Brooklyn’s Sey and Cafe Integral. Music will play a big role with selections curated by Four Horsemen partner and LCD Soundsystem’s frontman, James Murphy.

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13
Caffe Panna
Photograph: Courtesy Caffe Panna
Restaurants, Ice cream parlors

Caffè Panna

icon-location-pin Gramercy

Hallie Meyer, daughter of the acclaimed restaurateur Danny Meyer, opens her new Rome-inspired ice cream shop with flavors like Hazelnut Sour Cherry Stratiechella. Soon, aperitivos and Italian pastries will be rolled out as well.

14
Photograph: Hometown-Bar-B-Q/Ken Goodman

Hometown-Bar-B-Q at Industry City

Meat sweats, anyone? New York’s most rabid barbecue fans and critics alike often agree on one thing: Billy Durney’s Hometown-Bar-B-Que in Red Hook serves the city’s best barbecue (some would argue it’s among the best in the country). Now, Durney has opened the second location of one of the best New York restaurants inside the sprawling Industry City development. Hometown is known for its international flair with dishes like lamb belly banh mi and Jamaican jerk baby back ribs. This location rolled out new items to with a similar ethos: tacos ($8) served on homemade flour tortillas can be topped with brisket (with queso and salsa roja), pulled pork or Oaxacan chicken. There’s also Durney’s jalapeño cheddar sausage ($8 for ¼ pound).

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15
Photograph: Cathédrale/Tao Hospitality Group
Restaurants, French

Cathédrale

icon-location-pin East Village

The hip Moxy East Village turns to a cuisine that could feel staid. But Executive Chef Jason Hall (Gotham Bar & Grill, Craft and Anthos) alongside chef-partner Ralph Scamardella makes French-Mediterranean food feel (and taste) refreshing. His seasonal approach in the open kitchen means guests will find dishes like roasted lobster with wild oregano, lemon and parsley butter or hamachi crudo with green apple and black olive oil. The restaurants sits in a former nightclub spot with multiple rooms perfect for group dining.

16
Photograph: Nicole Franzen
Restaurants, Italian

Felice 56

icon-location-pin Midtown West

The Sant Ambroeus Hospitality Group is known for its group of stylish Italian restaurants. From breakfast to dinner, the menu here takes on a Tuscan theme with cappuccinos by Lavazza and cacio e pepe by Executive Chef Adrian Kercuku. Located just off Fifth Avenue from numerous shops, the sprawling space has an airy feel with lime-washed finishes and a watercolor painting by anchoring the main dining room.

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17
Photograph: Greg Rhein Photography
Restaurants, Barbecue

Hyun

icon-location-pin Midtown

Hyun is located just a block north from the epicenter of Manhattan’s Koreatown on 32nd Street but feels worlds away. The dimly-lit space is sleek with dark wood-paneled walls, ceremonial brassware and diners seem to speak in hushed tones as pristine slices of Japanese A5 Wagyu beef shows up at their table. A server grills and cuts all your barbecue meats, which you can pair with expertly-made Korean dishes such as pots of cooked rice with sea urchin and truffle.

18
Photograph: Liz Clayman
Restaurants, French

Le Club

icon-location-pin Chelsea

The food is often overlooked at trendy Meatpacking District establishments, but Le Club, formerly Le Grill de Joël Robuchon, bucks this trend. Guests can feast on everything from hamachi atop crispy coconut rice to warm beignets at one of the plush banquettes.

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