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Thai Diner
ALEX MUCCILLI

The best new restaurants in NYC for March 2020

From a Thai-inspired diner to a spot offering Roman-style pinsas, head to the best new restaurants in NYC this month

By Bao Ong and Emma Orlow
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Spring is just around the corner, which means it's time to check out contenders for best New York restaurants. Get out of your winter rut. We promise, it’ll be worth it when you're checking out these new restaurants—including one focused on Burmese food, a cuisine not often seen across the city.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

Best new restaurants NYC

Thai Diner
Thai Diner
ALEX MUCCILLI

1. Thai Diner

Restaurants Thai Nolita

The brains behind the megahits Uncle Boons and Uncle Boons Sister, Ann Redding and Matt Danzer have opened New York’s latest take on the diner. Begin the morning with a breakfast plate of eggs and taro hash browns, Thai tea-babka French toast or Thai disco fries.

Rangoon
Rangoon
Courtesy of Rangoon

2. Rangoon

Restaurants Burmese Crown Heights

Started in 2015, chef Myo Moe’s erstwhile Burmese pop-up has become a brick-and-mortar restaurant. While this southeast Asian cuisine is rare in the city, Moe’s menu offers a tasty primer.  The sleek, all-white space is an excellent foil for the colorful dishes, including lemongrass fish stew, cinnamon chicken and spicy pork mee shay.

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Photography: Danny Prussman

3. Ras Plant Based

News Eating

The cozy Cobble Hill restaurant Awash has been a destination for Ethiopian cuisine and at their new 65-seat restaurant—formerly a sports bar—the focus is on a 100 percent vegan menu that draws on organic and local ingredients as much as possible.

Rule of Thirds
Rule of Thirds
Eric Medsker

4. Rule of Thirds

Restaurants Greenpoint

JT Vuong and George Padilla (Okonomi) and Sunday Hospitality (Sunday in Brooklyn) have joined forces to focus on Japanese-style home cooking. Dishes include steak tonkatsu and ube soft serve. The eatery is located inside of A/D/O, a design-focused workspace and home-goods shop.

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Photograph: Courtesy Mokyo

5. Mokyo

Restaurants East Village

The new restaurant from the team behind the East Village favorite is just as intriguing (save room for a Pop Rock dessert) as its original outpost. Here, tapas are influenced by chef Kyungmin Kay Hyun’s travels to Spain and South America as well as her Korean heritage. 

Bar Camillo
Bar Camillo
Photograph: Raffaele De Vivo

6. Bar Camillo

Restaurants Italian Bedford-Stuyvesant

Pinsas—the airy, crisp Roman-style pizzas—take center stage at this cozy eatery, a follow-up to Camillo, the Prospect Lefferts Gardens favorite. The oven-baked cacio e pepe and other soul-soothing dishes pair well with the Negronis, spritzes and other mixed libations (all $10). Bonus: There will be alfresco dining when the backyard opens.

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Karazishi Botan
Karazishi Botan
Naoko Takagi

7. Karazishi Botan

Restaurants Carroll Gardens

During his time at the popular chain Ippudo, chef Foo Kanegae helped introduce Americans to more than 600 types of traditional ramen. Now, his so-called ramen diner will offer other innovative noodle-soup and comfort-food recipes that combine Japanese and Western influences.

Da Toscano
Da Toscano
Photograph: Evan Sung

8. Da Toscano

Restaurants Italian Greenwich Village

Michael Toscano was Perla’s head chef before decamping, in 2015, to Charleston, South Carolina. But now he’s back in the same space with his own restaurant, Da Toscano, where he showcases Italian cuisine with plates like veal-head parmigiana and oysters roasted in crab fat.

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Torien
Torien
Photograph: Courtesy Torien/Liz Clayman

9. Torien

Restaurants Japanese Noho

It’s nearly impossible to secure a reservation at Torishiki, Yoshiteru Ikegawa’s 16-seat restaurant in Tokyo. But New Yorkers can now get a taste of the famed yakitori menu at Torien. Here, the omakase experience is focused on using every part of the chicken—cooked on charcoal grills and served on skewers, of course.

JUA
JUA
Photograph: Dan Ahn

10. Jua

Restaurants Flatiron

Executive chef Ho Young Kim, formerly of Jungsik, focuses on wood-fired grilling at this fine-dining spot. The nine-course tasting menu  ($95) features a selection of Korean dishes, such as truffle jjajangmen, that are ideal for a splurge.

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Photography: Christian Harder

11. Quality Bistro

Restaurants French Midtown West

New York is full of French-style bistros, but this restaurant from the hospitality group Quality Branded is putting a modern spin on the classic menu with items like crabcake paillard, Moroccan fried chicken and hasselback butternut squash.

Sauced
Sauced
Photograph: Mylene Fernandes

12. Sauced

Bars Wine bars Williamsburg

Just like at the team’s other concepts, Loosie Rogue and Etiquette, you can order wine alongside snacks—in this case, chips with creme fraiche, caramelized onions, and caviar—as well as dance under a disco ball at this bar. In the summer, the backyard will host table tennis.

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13. Kissaki Omakase

Restaurants Japanese East Village

Nestled in Lower East Side Manhattan, Kissaki is a recent addition to New York’s food scene. With a minimalistic sushi bar, the restaurant is home to traditional Japanese cuisine, particularly with its omakase dining experience which means guests pretty much leave themselves, and their meal, in the hands of the chef who artistically pulls it together in front of them. Alongside omakase, the restaurant also uses the kaiseki cooking method which is dedicated to harmony between the seasons and the food we eat. As a result, the menu focuses on all things fresh, local and seasonal and has featured the likes of fried eggplant and squash soup.The chefs also accommodate dietary restrictions, but fyi: the menus here do contain food allergens found in raw fish, shellfish, wheat, soy, diary, peanuts, tree nuts and eggs. 

Venue says Experience Omakase - a culinary experience honoring Japanese tradition. Open for takeout and delivery today.

Photography: Jose Solis

14. Paisley

Restaurants Indian Tribeca

Unlike many Indian restaurants in town focused on one region, chef Peter Beck (formerly of Tamarind) explores the subcontinent’s diverse culinary offerings. The result is a menu showcasing flavor-packed dishes, including Konkan fish curry and a lamb soup known as Kashmiri yakhni.

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Piggyback
Piggyback
Photograph: Melissa Hom

15. Piggyback NYC

Restaurants Pan-Asian Chelsea

The menu here is like a scrapbook of the travels chefs Leah Cohen and her husband, co-owner Ben Byruch, have taken throughout Asia: crisp shrimp-toast okonomiyaki (a nod to Japan), turmeric fish with noodles (a Vietnamese specialty), a pho French dip and other inventive takes.

Little Ways
Little Ways
Photograph: Courtesy of Little Ways

16. Little Ways

Restaurants Soho

The team behind the Flower Shop, the popular LES  bar known for its '70s basement party vibe, has debuted a more upscale sister restaurant. The kitchen is led by chef Michael Hamilton and features dishes such as chicken schnitzel and tiramisu.

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Photography: Paul Prince

17. La Rôtisserie Du Coin

Restaurants French Forest Hills

The couple Jimmy and Sonia Arouche, who were homesick for Paris, have opened a fast casual rotisserie chicken spot focused on traditional Gallic recipes. Each roasted bird can be accompanied by homemade fries, haricot verts and ratatouille.

Photograph: Time Out/ Ali Garber

The 100 best restaurants in NYC to dine at now

Restaurants

We completed a major overhaul of our crown-jewel guide to dining out in NYC over the fall and introduced 65 exciting restaurants to our top-100 list. Our hunt for best is ongoing, however, and we’ve added places that we believe reflect the way you like to eat out in the best city on earth through 2020. We’re talking fresh, inventive, memorable and, clearly, the tastiest establishments in town. These are the 100 restaurants we can’t quit—even when there’s a constant revolving door of new restaurants and bar openings in NYC.

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