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Restaurants in Red Hook: Where to eat in the Brooklyn neighborhood

Discover the best restaurants in Red Hook, Brooklyn—including Pok Pok Ny, Red Hook Lobster Pound and Stumptown Coffee Roasters.

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Appropriately for a waterfront neighborhood, Red Hook includes seafood restaurants like Brooklyn Crab and lobster-roll spot Red Hook Lobster Pound, as well as top Thai restaurant Pok Pok Ny. Food-truck culture is also well represented, with a number of Vendy Award winners setting up at the Red Hook Ball Fields.

RECOMMENDED: Red Hook neighborhood guide

Restaurants in Red Hook

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Restaurants
  • Red Hook

There’s been much written about how Billy Durney’s Red Hook Tavern draws inspiration from New York institutions. The font used for the restaurant’s name could be mistaken for Minetta Tavern’s from afar, and there are two ales dedicated to McSorley’s. But once we secured a seat (if you manage to score a prime-time reservation, play the lottery), we quickly realized the experience here is its very own thing.After an affable employee leads you down the narrow dining room or to one of the 18 bar seats, your first priority is to order the Dry Aged Red Hook Tavern Burger ($24). This pub-style burger is hefty but manageable. The simple dish—a dry-aged patty cloaked in American cheese and topped with raw white onions, then sandwiched between sesame rolls—is cooked to a perfect temperature. This juicy burger is one of the best we’ve tasted in the city.It’s no surprise that the burger and the menu’s other meat options are also expertly executed. Durney showed off his expertise with proteins at Hometown Bar-B-Que, a popular destination despite its location in difficult-to-get-to Red Hook, that’s known for its ribs, brisket, sausages, pastrami and other barbecue dishes with global touches.Executive chef Allison Plumer interprets the nostalgia that Red Hook Tavern strives for with an unfussy approach that results in plates you’ll want to devour on a cold winter day. The country-ham croquettes ($10), which are filled with white cheddar and sit atop a swath of dijonnaise, can be popped into

Hometown Bar-b-que
  • Restaurants
  • Barbecue
  • Red Hook
  • price 3 of 4

Grab your Wet-Naps—Brooklyn’s BBQ renaissance shows no signs of cooling off. This wood-paneled 120-seat smokehouse is the latest addition to the scene, a collaboration between self-taught pit master Billy Durney and restaurateur Christopher Miller (Smith & Mills, Warren 77). Inspired by his Brooklyn upbringing and travels through the South, Durney turns out 'cue with global influences. Dig into smoked meats both American (Texas-style brisket, North Carolina–inspired baby back ribs) and international (smoked jerk chicken, lamb belly banh mi). The drinks match the honky-tonk menu: Bartenders pour draft beers (Smuttynose, Shiner Bock) and American whiskeys (Van Brunt Stillhouse).

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  • Restaurants
  • Seafood
  • Red Hook
  • price 2 of 4

Channeling Maine's minigolf clam shacks, this hulking 250-seat eatery brings putt-putt facilities and seaside tastes to Red Hook's waterfront. Elevated on stilts, the three-story stand-alone restaurant is done up with wharf-themed flourishes: lobster traps, fishing rods, Christmas lights and a mounted shark's head. Gather friends for a round of minigolf or cornhole (beanbag toss) outdoors. After hitting the greens, grab a picnic table and dig into simple coastal fare, such as peel-and-eat shrimp and steam pots brimming with lobster, Jonah crab and mussels, along with potatoes and corn. Drinkers can sip frozen daiquiris or split a bucket of beer (Corona, Bud) with pals on the open-air roof deck, which boasts clear views of New York's Upper Bay.

  • Restaurants
  • Bakeries
  • Red Hook
  • price 2 of 4

At this snug bakery and café in Red Hook, kids can load up on homestyle American sweets like fruit pies, brownies, cupcakes and red velvet cake. The traditional apple pie is the best we've ever had (sorry, Mom).

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  • Restaurants
  • Trucks
  • Red Hook
  • price 1 of 4

From their Vendy Award–winning truck, husband-and-wife team Rafael Soler and Reina Bermudez have been serving (cheese, meat, and veggie) pupusas with all the fixins—pickled jalapeños, tomato sauce and coleslaw—since 1998. Grab their acclaimed Salvadoran-style grub (at the Brooklyn Flea every weekend, or through their pop ups at Vendy Plaza and Royal Palms Shuffle Board Club).

  • Restaurants
  • Pizza
  • Red Hook
  • price 2 of 4

The mobile pizza standby—a favorite at food flea Smorgasburg and Crown Heights beer hall Berg'n—gets its first permanent flagship in Red Hook, slinging Neapolitan-style pies from a turn-of-the-century oven found ensconced behind a wall in the formerly abandoned storefront. Restoring the hearth's original cast-iron details, but trading coal for wood, chef-owners Dave Sclarow and Anna Viertel pull rounds topped with everything from bacon fat to clams to pistachio pesto (with winter greens, fresh mozzarella, ricotta and pecorino). There are also composed small plates that showcase Sclarow's finesse from working in kitchens like Esca, including a pancetta-crowned cassoulet with shell beans, steamed mussels with sesame fry bread and crispy chicken agro-dolce with chilis, peanuts and cilantro. The team looked to the history of the 'hood for decor inspiration—bar stools are welded from Red Hook public schools' discarded desks and tables are constructed from bowling-alley wood. At the bar, made out of salvaged soap stone, cocktails pay homage to the cigar maker who once inhabited the space: the gin-fortified Harry’s Bouquet (Aperol, house lemon bitters, anise rinse) is named after a popular cigar blend. Also offered is a selection of biodynamic and natural wines, such as a deep-red, fruit-dense Chinon Cabernet Franc from Domaine Beatrice et Pascal Lambert.

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Defonte’s
  • Restaurants
  • Sandwich shops
  • Red Hook
  • price 1 of 4

If you’re lucky enough to live or work near this legendary Red Hook sandwich shop, you know the secret of its success: massive, old-school Italian heros. Buns are layered with ingredients like ham, provolone, salami, roast beef, mozzarella and fried eggplant. In the Gramercy location, prepared dinners (macaroni with vodka sauce, chicken parmigiana) in microwaveable containers are available to go.  

Steve's Authentic Key Lime Pie
  • Restaurants
  • Bakeries
  • Red Hook
  • price 2 of 4

Hurricane Sandy couldn't stop the beloved Red Hook pie shop from making a sweet return to the Brooklyn waterfront. Waist-high flooding ravaged the original factory on Pier 41, putting owner Steve Tarpin and his pastry lieutenants out of commission during their busiest season. The Miami native makes his big comeback on the next pier over, with a sunny kitchen three times the size of his old one. Find his signature graham-cracker-crusted pies—filled with a condensed-milk custard laced with zesty lime juice—and the Swingle—a tartlet dipped in dark Belgian chocolate—inside the tropical-orange-hued bakery. The pies may be the same, but Tarpin will hang a new vintage glass sign etched with the shop’s motto: "Always Freshly Squeezed."

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  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary American
  • Red Hook
  • price 2 of 4

This affordable, sophisticated Brooklyn restaurant—evocative of a first-class dining car with its glossy blond wood paneling—consistently packs in local crowds. Much of the credit goes to chef Sohui Kim (Blue Hill, Annisa), whose Asian-inspired menu flirts with European influences in dishes like flavorful barramundi with brussels sprouts, apples and bacon in a sorrel-based sauce. Getting there (for non-Hookers) can be a tougher sell: Expect at least a ten-minute walk from the subway.

  • Restaurants
  • Thai
  • Red Hook

This LES eatery ushered in a wave of restaurants that are centered on regional Thai fare. The focus is no different at its latest location, which serves jaew hon, a seldom-seen Southeast Asian take on hot pot in which diners dip various cuts of meat and seafood into bubbling cauldrons of broth.

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