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The 100 best restaurants in Paris

Salivate over the best restaurants in Paris, from the long-reigning kings of the food scene to sparky newbies

© Time Out
By Tina Meyer and Time Out editors |
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The search for a good restaurant is never over in a city like Paris. Whether it’s a gourmet bistro for a memorable night with friends, a grab-and-go lunch spot, a legendary junk food fix or a one-off treat for your taste buds, the possibilities are endless.

So we’ve compiled a list of our 100 best restaurants, all road-tested anonymously by the editorial team. We don’t review on a complimentary basis and pay for everything we order, just like any other diner. From €5 bao buns to alchemic creations costing hundreds, we’ve taken into account each restaurant’s creativity, warmth, buzz, service and of course, what we’re putting in our mouths, to compile this bible of what’s what in the Parisian eating scene.

From haute cuisine to Asian to French traditional, there’s something for every palette – and budget – in the list.

Best restaurants in Paris

1
Mokonuts
Photograph: Mokonuts
Restaurants, Diners

Mokonuts

icon-location-pin Charonne

Who’s it for? Foodies who like being kept on their toes with exciting flavour combos.

What should I order? The absurdly good za’atar labneh, slathered on freshly made pitta, or the roasted pumpkin, dipped in a creamy tahini. Those with a sweet tooth will be in heaven – Mokonuts does the best cookies in Paris, without a doubt.

How much? €45 per person for a choice of three starters, mains and desserts. Lunch is €20-€25 for three courses. On weeknights, you can book for groups of six to 12.

Mokonuts is simply our most treasured address. Why? Behind that open counter, Omar Koreitem conjures up one-of-a-kind, globe-trotting dishes inspired by his Levantine roots. The to-die-for sweet treats baked by his business partner, Moko Hirayama, are unmissable. Glowing word-of-mouth reviews have done most of the leg work for Mokonuts, but it’s just as fresh and exciting as when it was born. Bravo!

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2
L'Astrance
Photograph: L'Astrance
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Astrance

icon-location-pin 16e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Five-star diners in search of haute cuisine that doesn’t break the bank.

What should I order? The buttery toothfish with white grape and tamarind sauce – the edible equivalent of a trip down the the Mekong river.

When should I go? Weekday lunchtimes, when you can get a three-Michelin-starred meal for just €75.

For 18 years, Pascal Barbot has been tirelessly churning out stunning dishes that follow the whims of the market – and his mood. He has not achieved such fame with just technical know-how; his audacity plays a big part (which three-Michelin-starred joint would have dared to serve chilli sorbet, for example?) The room has remained unchanged for nearly two decades, but year after year, the dishes remain matchless. Book well in advance – we’re talking a month – for the €75 lunch menu (€120 with wine pairings).

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3
Septime
Photograph: Septime
Restaurants, French

Septime

icon-location-pin Roquette

Who’s it for? A seasoned gourmet in search of some sparkle.

What should I order? Duck filet with Guéthary anchovies and laurel-infused jus.

When should I go? At lunchtime, for the €45 set menu.


This is THE hottest table in the world, curated by Bertrand Grébaut, one of the most talented chefs of his generation – trained by industry heavyweights Robuchon and Passard. We’ll never cease to be amazed by Septime’s ability to renew itself and push boundaries year after year. It gets our vote every time – for the perfect décor (raw wood tables, exposed beams), the spot-on but not obsequious service, and dishes that linger on long after you’ve cleared your plate. The only drawback? Getting a table is like being a contestant on the Hunger Games.

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4
Abri Soba
Photograph: Abri Soba
Restaurants, Japanese

Abri Soba

icon-location-pin Faubourg Montmartre

Who’s it for? Soba buffs.

What should I order? The soba with tempura shrimp and vegetables.

How much? €6-€9 for small plates, €9-€17 for sobas (add €6 for the lunch menu, with salad, rice and ‘tapas’ dish).

Admittedly, we love chef Katsuaki Okiyama’s first address, cute Japanese bistro Abri, but it’s his second that truly thrills. We can’t get enough of its zen Japanese décor, wooden walls and concrete floor – but mostly we love it for its sublime buckwheat soba noodles, to be slurped in a hot or cold broth that’s delicate, flavourful and probably the best in Paris. The evening menu is more refined – think sake-steamed clams, miso pork roll salad and a short but perfectly formed wine list.

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5
L'Arpege
Photograph: L’Arpege
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

L’Arpège

icon-location-pin Invalides

Who’s it for? Everyone – just once in their lives.

What should I order? The leek in chicken jus.

How much? €145 at lunch and €320-€390 in the evening.


Impressionist chef Alain Passard has been fighting for vegetable emancipation since the beginning of the noughties – this is a man who worships the tomato as if it were a juicy steak. His hallucinatory plates make all the produce sing; there’s no extravagance here, just powerful flavours and ingenious texture combinations. His painstakingly put-together fruit and vegetable dishes are sourced straight from his garden. Be warned: you’ll have 14 dishes to taste over the course of four hours. Better get comfy. 

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6
Da Graziella
Photograph: Da Graziella
Restaurants, Pizza

Da Graziella

icon-location-pin Poissonnière

Who’s it for? Pizza connoisseurs forever in search of that perfect dough: crispy yet melt-in-the-mouth.

What should I order? Neapolitan fried pizza.

How much? €11-€19 for the pizza of your dreams.

We fell head over heels for this Neapolitan pizzeria, which replaced Vivant Cave. The interior of this former bird shop is delightful – think Art Nouveau tiling in shades of emerald, chartreuse and lemon yellow. Pizza dough is beautifully proofed, gooey and wood-fired to perfection. Toppings are top-notch too: think San Marzano AOP tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil from Sorrento and anchovies from Cetara in Campania. This is the only pizzeria in Paris that does the Neapolitan speciality of fried pizza: fresh ingredients are placed on fried dough, then wood-fired. If you have room, try the dessert version with chocolate sauce.

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7
Restaurant Passerini
Photograph: Restaurant Passerini
Restaurants, Italian

Restaurant Passerini

icon-location-pin 12e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Anyone who’s been to Rino, in Northern Italy. And pasta addicts, naturally.

What should I order? Anything that involves their fresh handmade pasta.

How much? The €24 weekday lunch menu is great value.

How could we leave Giovanni Passerini out of the top 10? One of our favourite Italians and purveyor of Paris’s best pasta, Passerini’s cooking is precise, full of love and totally without airs. The tripes all’amatriciana is something else too.

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8
Miznon
Photograph: Emmanuel Chirache
Restaurants, Turkish

Miznon

icon-location-pin Le Marais

Who’s it for? Pitta devotees.

What should I order? Lamb kebab pitta with braised cauliflower.

Best buy? The €3.50 Tarte Tatin pitta – caramelised apples stuffed in a bready parcel. Heaven in a handful.

Chicken, fish, steak or veggie – roll up your sleeves and prepare to get messy with Miznon’s pitta artistry. Décor is devilishly baroque, with fruit and vegetables overflowing from the shelves, a dance-y playlist and cheery staff. It’s often rammed, but well worth the 10-minute wait. Trust us.

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9
Photograph: Les Déserteurs
Restaurants, Creative contemporary

Les Déserteurs

icon-location-pin Charonne

Who’s it for? Fun-lovers and fans of Le Sergent Recruteur.

What should I order? A perfectly balanced dessert, like the cheesecake with delicate grapefruit sorbet.

How much? Set lunch is €30 and set dinner €49.

If you haven’t yet had the chance to dine at this beautiful address, get there quick. Rumour has it the place has been sold and will be closing down in a few months. Daniel Baratier and Alexandre Céret (both ex-Sergent Recruteur) are part of the team and the cooking is pure, finessed and frankly extraordinary. Don’t miss Thierry Delabre’s leavened bread –and the 300-strong wine list.

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10
Photograph: Le Servan
Restaurants, Bistros

Le Servan

icon-location-pin Roquette

Who’s it for? Gourmets with a penchant for subtle small plates.

What should I order? The zazouski as an amuse-bouche, the tasty boudin noir wonton or Thai basil cockles.

When should I go? Lunch is best, when the set menu is €27.

These imaginative dishes come from the young Tatiana Levha (ex-Arpège and Astrance) and Bertrand Grébaut (Septime). Think raw cuttlefish with green mango and Patis chicken with white asparagus, a walnut crumb and chorizo. The setting is all gilded brass, ceiling mouldings and an open kitchen.

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11
Jin Paris japonais étoilé restaurant
© Thierry Richard
Restaurants, Japanese

Jin

icon-location-pin 1er arrondissement

Who’s it for? Sushi obsessives – or anyone after Instagram-friendly aesthetics.

What should I order? The sea urchin tongue sushi.

How much? It comes at a price – the cheapest menu is €95 at lunch.

This sushi bar has a sober décor of imported Japanese wood, with nothing to distract the diner from dinner. There are only 12 seats, set around the chef’s workstation, and it’s here you eat and watch chef Takuya Watanabe (Taku) do his thing – aloof and imposing, he already heads up four other restaurants in Sapporo. To be clear, you don’t come to Jin for a boozy catch-up with your mates – all attention here is on the food. Taku and his chefs’ ritualised preparation is mesmeric, as they repeat their cutting and slicing motions with the precision of a couple of metronomes, working on fresh fish pulled from Japanese cypress boxes before sculpting their sashimi with intense scrupulousness. 

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12
Le Chateaubriand
Le Chateaubriand
Restaurants, Bistros

Le Chateaubriand

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Bon viveurs, willing to try raw produce.

What should I order? The brilliant Spanish goat’s cheese with stewed apple jam.

How much? Set menus are €70 – reasonable for a Michelin-starred restaurant.

Self-taught Basque chef Iñaki Aizpitarte runs this stylish bistro, where cooking is at its most adventurous at dinner, with deconstructed dishes such as chunky steak tartare with quail’s egg, or asparagus with tahini foam and splinters of sesame-seed brittle. A much simpler (albeit cheaper) menu is served at lunch.

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13
Photograph: JC
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Quinsou

icon-location-pin Rennes-Sèvres

Who’s it for? Discerning diners who like to know the provenance of what’s on their plate.

What should I order? The produce in the daily-changing menu is the star of the show: think Saint-Guénolé grey sea bream with pink French apples, beans and sage butter.

When should I go? For the €35 set lunch menu.

We love Quinsou for being daring without a trace of pompousness. Chef Antonin Bonnet has a CV as long as his arm (Le Sergent Recruteur in Paris, The Green House in London and Languiole’s Maison Bras). Rustic, elegant and flavourful, Quinsou is one of Paris’s best restaurants – and it’s semi-affordable, too. 

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14
Le Baratin
Photograph: CC / Rex Roof
Restaurants, French

Le Baratin

icon-location-pin Belleville

Who’s it for? Offal addicts.

What should I order? Beef cheek, stewed with love.

When should I go? For the €19 lunch menu.

Star pastry chef Pierre Hermé visits this cheerful little bistro and wine bar high up in Belleville at least every two weeks to fill up on Raquel Carena’s homey cooking (with the occasional exotic twist). Typical of her style, which draws on her native Argentina, is a tuna carpaccio with cherries, roast Basque lamb with new potatoes and spinach, and hazelnut pudding. If the food weren’t so fantastic, it would still be worth coming for the (mostly) organic wines. Le Baratin attracts gourmands from all over Paris, so be sure to book.

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15
Photograph: Tina Meyer
Restaurants, French

Les Pantins

icon-location-pin Paris et sa banlieue

Who’s it for? Fans of haute bistro cuisine.

What should I order? The grilled Basque octopus with garlic mousse, dill and raw beetroot.

When should I go? For lunch, when set menus are €18-€21.

Gleaming with 1950s elegance, you can sink into these duck-egg blue banquettes seven days a week – which, in Paris, is a true bonus. This high-end bistro is reasonably priced, with Wahid Sahed (ex-Bristol) in the driving seat during the week and Antonin Mandel (of Shangri-La and Ze Kitchen Galerie fame) taking the reins at the weekend. Accompany generous, punchy dishes with picks from Guillaume Maugain’s wine list (he was formerly at Verre Volé), preferably on the huge terrace. 

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16
Abri resto Paris
Photograph: Thierry Richard
Restaurants, Bistros

Abri

icon-location-pin Poissonnière

Who’s it for? Diners with one foot in Paris and one in Tokyo.

What should I order? The marinated Japanese mackerel, accompanied by almost transparent chopped vegetables.

When should I go? For the €26 set lunch menu, or the cult tonkatsu sandwich – €13 from 10am to 5pm.


This pocket-sized restaurant next to Poissonière is known for one thing in particular: their multi-layered, super-stacked, millefeuille-esque sandwiches, put together by chef Katsuaki Okiyama. Think grilled bread, a lovely rich sauce, a vegetable omelette, crusty breaded pork (‘tonkatsu’), sweet and sour cauliflower puree and soft cheese. The Japanese chef’s CV (Robuchon, Taillevent, Agapé) would be impressive even for someone far older, and with its understated Parisian décor, his own French-Japanese address is one not to miss. 

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17
© Deux fois plus de piment
Restaurants, Chinese

Deux fois plus de piment

icon-location-pin Saint-Ambroise

Who’s it for? Spice fiends, of course.

What should I order? The fiery beef ragù.

How much? The lunch menus are €8-€12, starters from €4.20 and main dishes start at €7.80.

Review coming soon.

Time Out says
18
Photograph: Les Arlots
Restaurants, Bistros

Les Arlots

icon-location-pin SoPi (South Pigalle)

Who’s it for? Those after a proper bistro.

What should I order? The to-die-for sausage and mash.

When should I go? For the €18-€22 lunchtime menu.

Come for the super-friendly service and leave with a belly filled with love. The wine list is written with as much care and passion as the menu, putting the spotlight on small producers and natural wines. You’ll be coming back to Les Arlots again and again. 

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19
Le 975
Photograph: Le 975
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Le 975

icon-location-pin Epinettes

Who’s it for? Those who love French cooking (and don’t mind Japanese flavours either). 

What should I order? Iberian confit pork with mashed potato and rocket.

When should I go? For the unbeatable lunchtime menu – €16 for a small starter, the dish of the day, coffee and a sweet treat.

Just around the corner from the Avenue de Clichy, this aquarium-like spot with huge windows fires out exquisite Japanese-French dishes from its open kitchen. Chef Taiki Tamao – formerly of Marc Vérat – has a thing for precise yet indulgent plates that offer a surprising mish-mash of flavours. And he does it brilliantly. It’s hard not to gawp at his culinary handiwork. Bonus points: sommelier Mathieu Orazi has around 100 refined bottles in stock (from just €21).

20
Le Dauphin
Photograph: Le Dauphin
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Le Dauphin

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Fans of high-flying cuisine, without the price tag.

What should I order? Squid ink risotto. 

How much? Small plates start from €3.50 – but beware, they stack up quickly.

This restaurant from basque chef Iñaki Aizpitarte (Chateaubriand) feels a bit like an experimental food lab. All mirrors and Carrara marble, the décor is clinical yet classy, with a trendy clientele served by stylish staff who come across experts. The small plates, almost tapas-esque, stick to the basics, with the marvellous squid ink risotto (€12) the clear, almost impossibly good highlight. Come for lunch and you can expect quite the U-turn: the midday menu has a South-East Asian theme. 

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21
tagine
Photograph: Alpha
Restaurants, Moroccan

Le Tagine

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Couscous aficionados. 

What should I order? The couscous special with a range of different meats. The semolina is hand-rolled and super-fine, accompanied by a mélange of vegetables: potatoes, carrots, turnip and courgettes.

How much? Natural wines are €5-€8 by the glass, with bottles from €25.

We love the Arabian Nights décor, cocktails (one’s a compelling concoction of curaçao, fig liqueur, orange juice and mint), and a superb selection of natural wines. Plus the tagines, of course, which Yves Camdeborde says are the best in the city.

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22
Soya
Photograph: Soya
Restaurants, Vegetarian

Soya

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Vegetarians and vegans, but also anyone most likely to say ‘vegetarian dishes are the worst’.

What should I order? A Thai lentil dahl with watercress and alfafa sprouts, with a bowl of asparagus, carrots, peppers and tomatoes.

How much? Weekday lunch menus are €15-€23, with bottomless tea. Weekend all-you-can-eat veggie brunch is €30.

A loft-style hangout cherished by vegetarians and vegans since it opened in 2007, Soya has affordable lunch and dinner menus, and a moreish brunch to boot. Italian and Middle Eastern plates are what it does best, with the mezze platter (€13, including beetroot caviar, aubergines, courgettes, mushrooms and delicate strips of marinated soya) a standout. Pair your meal with a glass of natural wine or cocktail of kombucha, rum and pineapple (€10).

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23
ruisseau burger paris
Photograph: Time Out / AW
Restaurants, American

Le Ruisseau

icon-location-pin Mairie du 18e

Who’s it for? Anyone who swears by PNY.

What should I order? The blue cheese burger, with melted bleu d’Auvergne.

How much? €13-15 for burger, fries and salad. €15 for two pot luck mini-burgers. Add €5 for supersized burgers.

We’ve loved Le Ruisseau since it opened. After some heated office debate, we decided Le Ruisseau should pip PNY to the ‘best burger in Paris’ post. Why? Located on a street corner, it comes alive at night, with all the action taking place around the main counter. The long narrow terrace is beyond ideal on a beautiful day, the lager is decent and the service is professional, efficient and fun. The quality of the ingredients is stunning too: buns are made fresh twice daily, beef is from Limousin cows from the fields of Pas-de-Calais and the twice-cooked chips have a melting centre and superb crispy edge. Burger bliss.

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24
Ze Kitchen Galerie
Photograph: Ze Kitchen Galerie
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Ze Kitchen Galerie

icon-location-pin 6e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Those with refined tastebuds. 

What should I order? Miso rabbit with harissa, artichokes, spinach and Swiss chard.

How much? The lunchtime menu is €41.

Review coming soon.

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25
Yoshinori
Photograph: Yoshinori
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Yoshinori

icon-location-pin Saint-Germain-des-Prés

Who’s it for? Anyone after beauty on a plate.

What should I order? The confit duck foie gras, smoked eel and quince.

When should I go? For the €35-€45 lunchtime set menu.

From the plates to the décor, everything at this vibrant tribute to French gastronomy comes with a Japanese touch. Think edible flowers and a haven of limestone and bleached white beams.

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26
Vivant
Photograph: Vivant
Restaurants, French

Vivant

icon-location-pin Poissonnière

Who’s it for? Devotees of Pierre Touitou (ex-Pierre Gagnaire, Aux Deux Amis).

What should I order? Giant pasta tubes with spicy tuna ragù.

How much? €6 for small plates; wines from €6 a glass.

Review coming soon.

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27
Gare au Gorille
Photograph: Gare au Gorille
Restaurants, Creative contemporary

Gare au Gorille

icon-location-pin Batignolles

Who’s it for? Anyone in search of good food in the 17th.

What should I order? Cod with mussels and Jura sausages.

When should I go? For the three-course €29 lunch menu.


As one of the only cool bistros in the 17th, Gare au Gorille oscillates between audacity and sophistication, with a daily-changing menu designed by Marc Cordonnier (ex-second-in-command to Bertrand Grébaut). Prices are reasonable for this area: the lunch menu is €29 all-in, while evenings are €39 for five dishes. The globe-trotting wines are selected by Louis Langevin (ex-Septime).

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28
Clown Bar
Photograph: Clown Bar
Restaurants, French

Clown Bar

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Interior design obsessives.

What should I order? Veal brains with tosazu sauce.

How much? Without a set menu or lunchtime deal, these small plates add up.


Despite ex-Vivant chef Sota Atsumi leaving Clown Bar, this spot continues to offer classy food, with a décor that’s even classier. Ewen Lemoigne’s 150-strong wine list is a highlight. Low point? The prices go up year on year.

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29
L'avant comptoir des cochons
Photograph: L'Avant Comptoir du Marché
Bars and pubs, Tapas bars

L’Avant Comptoir du Marché

icon-location-pin Odéon

Who’s it for? Those of a porky persuasion.

What should I order? A glass of red and a buttered sausage open sandwich.

How much? €4-€10 for small plates and €2-€6 for desserts.

We’re obsessed with the Bordier butter pats on the counter at L’Avant Comptoir du Marché and the cornbread is totally addictive. Wash the rich pork dishes down with natural wines by the glass. Thank you Yves Camdeborde.

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30
Photograph: Shang Palace
Restaurants, Chinese

Shang Palace

icon-location-pin Chaillot

Who’s it for? Who wouldn’t be tempted by the only Michelin-starred Chinese restaurant in France?

What should I order? The crispy-skinned Peking duck, served with rice pancakes and Hoisin sauce. Or the chef’s fried rice, an interpretation of Cantonese rice with Peking honey pork and slivers of egg yolk.

How much? The best deal is the lunch menu, which, at €58, is very accessible for a Michelin-starred address.

The décor at Shang Palace might as well be straight out of Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel – think exotic wallpapered elevators and waltzing staff in traditional Chinese costume. Canton and Huaiyang, provinces in south-western China, inspire the 80 Michelin-starred dishes on the menu. Expect to be blown away by these heady yet refined flavours.

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31
Photograph: Yam’Tcha
Restaurants, Chinese

Boutique Yam’Tcha

icon-location-pin Les Halles

Who’s it for? Anyone after posh bao buns that won’t break the bank.

What should I order? The Stilton and amareno cherry bao.

How much? €16 for five bao buns and all other dishes are reasonably priced.


Chef Adeline Grattard’s plump steamed bao buns are made with wheat flour and stuffed with whatever takes her fancy: comté, curried onions, vegetables, crab, Basque pork and Sichuan aubergine. Beyond delicious.

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32
Les Canailles Ménilmontant
Photograph: Jill Cousin
Restaurants, French

Les Canailles Ménilmontant

icon-location-pin Ménilmontant

Who’s it for? Those looking for a flavour of old Paris.

What should I order? The beef tongue carpaccio with gribiche sauce.

How much? The €19 lunchtime set menu is a steal. 

The team behind Les Canailles Pigalle are back with their second outpost, this time not far from Père Lachaise. The menu features many of the same dishes and it’s easy to feel at ease among the Maurice Chevalier posters, azure mosaic floor and exposed brick bar. Sebastien Guillo’s kitchen skills are sure to wow, starting with his famed beef tongue carpaccio with gribiche sauce. The thin slices of meat come pleasantly warm, with a generous serving of cold gribiche sauce made with hard-boiled eggs, chives, gherkins and parmesan. Light and moreish, it’s the kind of dish you’ll want to take your time over. 

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33
Photograph: Jill Cousin
Restaurants, Japanese

Le Bien Venu

icon-location-pin Faubourg Montmartre

Who’s it for? Lucky hotel guests and donburi devotees.

What should I order? The spicy donburi curry with crispy vegetables.

How much? €16-€19 for lunchtime menus or €10 per dish in the evening.

There’s a lot to love about this restaurant hidden at the back of Hôtel Bienvenue: its cosy atmosphere, veggie-friendly Japanese cuisine, its natural wine list and the beautiful illustrations on the menu.

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34
Photograph: Le Villaret
Restaurants, Bistros

Le Villaret

icon-location-pin Saint-Ambroise

Who’s it for? The foodie friend who’s always claiming to have found the best bistro in Paris.

What should I order? The melt-in-the-mouth braised beef en croute.

When should I go? For the €22-€27 lunchtime set menu.

Review coming soon.

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35
Photograph: David Toutain
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

David Toutain

icon-location-pin 7e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Disciples of Passard and Gagnaire.

What should I order? The smoked eel.

When should I go? For the €55 lunchtime menu.

Review coming soon.

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36
Table
Photograph: DR
Restaurants, French

Table

icon-location-pin 12e arrondissement

Who’s it for? A naturalist.

What should I order? Pineapple cooked in cane sugar juice on a spit.

How much? The lunchtime menu is €29, dinner €89.

Review coming soon.

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37
Dilia
Photograph: Dilia
Restaurants, Italian

Dilia

icon-location-pin Belleville

Who’s it for? Those want to be whisked away to an Italian village. 

What should I order? Offal rigatoni with mint and pecorino.

How much? There’s a €21 set menu at lunchtime. 

Dilia is the closest you’ll get to an authentic Italian village without going beyond the Périphérique. Michele Farnesi took the reins of this 20th arrondissement hangout from her compatriot Simone Tondo a few years ago and has been steering the boat like a true captain. This is refined Italian cuisine served generously – every lunch offers a €17 set menu, made with super-fresh ingredients and always featuring a pasta dish. We tried the porchetta bruschetta with crushed tomatoes and a perfectly fried yellow plaice with zingy cucumber mayo and courgette salad. The textures were equally magnificent in an offal rigatoni dish with mint and pecorino. You know where to go for your next Italian staycation. 

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38
Caillebotte paris
Photograph: Caillebotte
Restaurants, Bistros

Caillebotte

icon-location-pin SoPi (South Pigalle)

Who’s it for? Pantruche regulars (it’s run by the same team).

What should I order? Flash-steamed Roumégous oysters with lettuce broth.

How much? Lunchtime menu is €19, dinner €36.


The bright décor at Caillebotte is bistro-inspired, with touches of Scandinavia; think open kitchen and pale wood. Its hearty dishes are thoughtful and surprising, without being disconcerting. Vegetables are from the family garden and there’s an exquisite, personal wine selection.

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39
Claude Colliot
Photograph: Claude Colliot
Restaurants, French

Claude Colliot

icon-location-pin Le Marais

Who’s it for? Fans of hearty cuisine with no boundaries.

What should I order? Raw blue shrimp with a crunchy shimeji mushroom broth.

How much? Choose any five meat-free à la carte dishes for €45.


Review coming soon.

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41
Biondi
Photograph: Biondi
Restaurants, Fusion

Biondi

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Barbecue junkies.

What should I order? Beef entrecôte with potatoes, confit shallots and chimichurri sauce.

How much? €16-€20 for starters and €30-€40 for mains.


Roll up meat lovers, this one will be right up your street. There isn’t a single non-carnivorous dish on the menu – does octopus count? – so it’s possibly not the best spot for a date with a vegetarian. Mains start at €30 so come with a healthy bank balance.

Time Out says
42
Chez La Vieille
Photograph: Chez La Vieille
Restaurants, French

Chez La Vieille

icon-location-pin Les Halles

Who’s it for? Anyone craving grandma-style farmhouse cooking.

What should I order? The blanquette de veau, served in a Staub dish with carrots and mushroom.

How much? It’s in the 1st arrondissement so prepare to dig deep: starters are €10-€15 and mains €20-€25.

You can perch at the giant basement bar without booking, or just come for a drink, while the ten-tabled dining room is warm and relaxed. Comfort food done brilliantly. 

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43
Au Nouveau Nez
Photograph: Au Nouveau Nez
Restaurants, French

Au Nouveau Nez

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Fans of all things South of Italy. 

What should I order? Gnudi with buffalo ricotta, orange flower water and sundried tomatoes.

How much? Everything’s a steal – especially the €9 gnudi. 

Headed up by a Tuscan chef and a Neapolitan sommelier, Au Nouveau Nez took root in a former wine cellar and has now extended into a perfect little restaurant, decorated with apple green walls and mismatched furniture. The menu features two starters, two mains, two desserts – and that’s it. The yellow plaice with grilled endive and preserved lemon is divine, but it should come as no surprise – chef Alessandra Olivi only works with super high-quality ingredients from small producers. Her gnudi (gnocchi-like dumplings stuffed with buffalo ricotta) were orange-scented with an umami hit from the sundried tomatoes and parmesan (€9). 

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44
Photograph: Clamato
Bars and pubs, Wine bars

Clamato

icon-location-pin Charonne

Who’s it for? Seafood lovers.

What should I order? Melt-in-the-mouth haddock with asparagus and red miso.

How much? Be warned: these perfect plates add up fast. €60 for seafood platters and €7-€30 for small plates. Sustainably caught and perfectly cooked fish doesn’t come cheap.

Clamato’s interior is a mix of fisherman’s hut wood, concrete and steel, with a menu that changes with the tide. Ingredients are of unparalleled freshness and the wines are excellent. The only downside? It’s walk-ins only.

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45
Paris New York PNY paris burger
Photograph: Rémi Guénaire
Restaurants, American

Paris-New York

icon-location-pin Strasbourg-Saint-Denis

Who’s it for? Hard-to-please burgerphiles.

What should I order? The smoky blue: smoked pork belly, Stilton and confit onions, with twice-cooked crispy fries.

How much? A burger, fries or salad and drink is €15.50 on weekday lunchtimes.

PNY’s Oberkampf address is the best yet, bigger than the first PNY in Strasbourg Saint-Denis and with more experienced staff.

Time Out says
46
Yam'Tcha
Photograph: Yam’Tcha
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Yam’Tcha

icon-location-pin Les Halles

Review coming soon. 

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47
Photograph: Jill Cousin
Restaurants, Italian

Racines

icon-location-pin Grands Boulevards

Who’s it for? Transalpine tastebuds, with a love of old-school bistros.

What should I order? The garganelli alla Genovese with pesto, walnuts and potato.

How much? There’s no set menu so get ready to flash your credit card.

Ex-Dilia chef Simone Tondo’s dishes are most comfortingly familiar, but there are some fiery additions. Make a beeline for southern wines like the Opi d’Aqui.

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48
Photograph: Sur Mer
Restaurants, Seafood

Sur Mer

icon-location-pin Canal Saint-Martin

Who’s it for? Seafood fans who appreciate some spice. 

What should I order? Perfectly steamed cod with a broth of scallops, Swiss chard and pickled mushrooms.

How much? The two-course lunchtime menu (sandwich and a starter or dessert). The three-course dinner menu is €32.

Twenty-eight-year-old Ugandan-Belgian chef Olive Davoux’s oceanic small plates are precise and globe-trotting. The daily-changing menu include sandwiches made with Ten Belles or Thierry Breton bread and the evening dishes are more refined. Don’t miss the handpicked oysters: highlights include Monsieur Jean-Paul’s Utah Beach and Cadoret de Bretagne.

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49
Photograph: Au Bon Coin
Restaurants, French

Au Bon Coin

icon-location-pin 18e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Those who dig a classic Parisian bistro.

What should I order? Warm herring potatoes or the terrine de campagne.

How much? €3.60 for starters and €9 for the dish of the day.

Review coming soon.

Time Out says
50
Sushi B
Photograph: Sushi B
Restaurants, Japanese

Sushi B

icon-location-pin 2e arrondissement

Review coming soon. 

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51
Photograph: Elmer
Restaurants, French

Elmer

icon-location-pin Arts et Métiers

Review coming soon. 

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53
Photograph: Jill Cousin
Restaurants, Bistros

Eels

icon-location-pin Poissonnière

Who’s it for? Anyone with a thing for citrus flavours, herbs or spice.

What should I order? The smoked eel with matcha mousse.

How much? The three-course lunch menu is €29.

The open kitchen at Eels is the room’s focus, and the minimal décor is as on-trend as it comes – as we’d expected from Adrien Ferrand, who was trained by William Ledeuil and shares his love of fresh herbs, citrus flavours and spice. The eel dish was ever-so-slightly smoky, with a cloud of foamed matcha and sorrel leaves. Grilled squid (€27) is served with spelt and watercress puree, and is made wedding-breakfast-perfect with lemon and Thai basil leaves, cutting through the flavours beautifully. Desserts pack a gourmet punch too: think creamy coconut, pineapple and lime (€11), with a skilful balance of textures. Eels – we’re ever so smitten.

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55
52 Faubourg Saint-Denis restaurant Paris
Photograph: Joan Bracco
Restaurants, Diners

52 Faubourg Saint-Denis

icon-location-pin Strasbourg-Saint-Denis

Who’s it for? All-hours party people – it’s open from 8am to midnight.

What should I order? A deconstructed coq au vin, with chicken simmered over a fire, plus potato, mushroom, bacon, garlic and herb puree.

How much? Think €15-€25 for a generous main. 

This multi-faceted no-reservations establishment is great for a productive morning with your laptop, accompanied by Julhès croissants and an excellent Café Compagnon coffee. But it’s just as good for a raucous dinner with friends – the menu is concise and the wine list well-priced. The humble interior is all stripped wood and distressed walls.

Time Out says
56
Photograph: French to Go
Restaurants, American

Frenchie To Go

icon-location-pin Sentier

Who’s it for? Anyone who likes to tackle their doorstep sandwiches, rather than simply eat them.

What should I order? The Reuben sandwich.

How much? Sandwiches €12-€14, fish and chips €15.

Gregory Marchand, of the gastronomic Frenchie on the same street, is an expert in joyful, modern and accessible finger food. Super fresh dishes are Anglo and American-inspired: think hot dogs, fish and chips and lobster rolls. Grab a bacon sandwich, egg and cheese English muffin or granola for breakfast, then stick around for elevenses – the double chocolate brownie and elegant cinnamon rolls are unmissable. Coffee is sourced from l’Arbre à Café, the roastery just across the street.

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57
Caffé Stern
Photograph: Caffè Stern
Restaurants, Italian

Caffè Stern

icon-location-pin Faubourg Montmartre

Review coming soon. 

Time Out says
58
Photograph: Hero
Restaurants, Korean

Hero

icon-location-pin Sentier

Who’s it for? Those who like Korean food with a side of hip hop.

What should I order? The sliced pork ssamjang bun. Or the famous yangnyeom fried chicken.

How much? Dishes from €6 to €18. 

This trendy Korean joint is all concrete blocks, tiny succulents and pretty string lanterns. Don’t miss the cocktails.

Time Out says