The 100 best restaurants in Paris

Salivate over the best restaurants in Paris, from the long-reigning kings of the foodie scene, to the sparky newbies.
© Time Out
By Tina Meyer and Time Out editors |
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The search for a good restaurant is never over in a city like Paris. Whether it’s a gourmet bistro for a memorable night with friends, a grab-and-go lunch spot, a legendary junk food fix or a one-off treat for your taste buds, the possibilities are endless.

So we’ve compiled a list of our 100 best restaurants, all road-tested anonymously by the editorial team. We don’t review on a complimentary basis and pay for everything we order, just like any other diner. From €5 bao buns to alchemic creations costing hundreds, we’ve taken into account each restaurant’s creativity, warmth, buzz, service and of course, what we’re putting in our mouths, to compile this bible of what’s what in the Parisian eating scene.

From haute cuisine to Asian to French traditional, there’s something for every palette – and budget – in the list.

Recommended: The 100 best bars in Paris

The 100 best restaurants in Paris

1
Mokonuts
Mokonuts
Restaurants, Diners

Mokonuts

icon-location-pin Charonne

Who’s it for? Foodies who like being kept on their toes with exciting flavour combos.

What should I order? The absurdly good zaatar labneh, slathered on freshly made pitta, or the roasted pumpkin, dipped in the creamy tahini sauce. Those with a sweet tooth will be in seventh heaven – Mokonuts does the best cookies in Paris, without a doubt.

How much? €45 per person for a choice between of three starters, mains and desserts. Lunch is €20-25 for three courses. On weeknights, you can book for groups of six to twelve.

Mokonuts is our go-to darling, our most treasured address. Why? Behind that open counter, Omar Koreitem is conjuring up unique, globe-trotting dishes inspired by his Levantine roots. The to-die-for sweet treats baked by his business partner, Moko Hirayama, are unmissable. Glowing word-of-mouth reviews have done most of the leg work for Mokonuts, but it’s just as fresh and exciting as when it was born. Bravo!

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2
© L'Astrance
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Astrance

icon-location-pin 16e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Five-star diners in search of haute French cuisine – that doesn’t break the bank.

What should I order? The buttery toothfish with white grape and tamarind sauce – the edible equivalent of a trip down the frozen depths and shores of the Mekong river.

When should I go? Weekday lunchtimes, when you can get a three Michelin-starred meal for just €75.

For eighteen years, Pascal Barbot has been tirelessly churning out stunning dishes to fit the market – and his mood. He has not achieved such prowess with just his virtuoso; his audacity plays a big part (which three Michelin-starred joint would have dared to serve chilli sorbet, for example?) The room has remained unchanged for twenty years, but year after year, some dishes remain unmatchable. Book well in advance (we’re talking a month) for the €75 lunch menu (€120 with wine pairings).

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3
Septime
Septime
Restaurants, French

Septime

icon-location-pin Roquette

Who’s it for? A seasoned gourmet, in search of some sparkle.

What should I order? Duck filet with Guéthary anchovies and laurel-infused jus.

When should I go? At lunchtime, for the €45 set menu.


This is THE hottest table in the world, curated by Bertrand Grébaut, one of the most talented chefs of his generation – who was trained by industry heavyweights Robuchon and Passard. We will never stop being amazed by Septime’s ability to renew itself and push boundaries year after year. It gets our vote every time – for the perfect décor (raw wood tables, exposed beams), for the spot-on, but not obsequious service and dishes that will linger on long after you have cleared your plate. The only drawback? Getting a table is like being a contestant on the Hunger Games.

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4
Abri Soba
Restaurants, Japanese

Abri Soba

icon-location-pin Faubourg Montmartre

Who’s it for? Soba buffs.

What should I order? The soba with tempura shrimp and vegetables.

How much? €6-9 for small plates, €9-17 for sobas (add €6 for the lunch menu, with salad, rice and a tapas dish).

Admittedly, we love chef Katsuaki Okiyama’s first address, the cute Japanese bistro Abri, but it’s his second brainchild that makes us go weak at the knees. For its zen Japanese décor, its wooded walls and concrete floor – but mostly for the sublime buckwheat soba noodles, to be slurped in a hot or cold broth. The delicate and flavouful broth is the best in Paris. The evening menu is more refined – think sake steamed clams, miso pork roll salad and a short but perfectly formed wine list.

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5
L'Arpege
L'Arpege
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

L'Arpège

icon-location-pin Invalides

Who’s it for? Everyone – just once in their lives.

What should I order? The leek in chicken jus.

How much? €145 at lunch and €320-390 in the evening.


Impressionist chef Alain Passard has been fighting for vegetable emancipation since the beginning of the noughties – this is a man who worships the tomato as if it were a juicy steak. His hallucinatory plates make all the produce sing; there’s no extravagance here, just powerful flavours and ingenious texture combinations. His painstakingly put-together fruit and vegetable dishes are sourced straight from his garden too. Be warned: you’ll have fourteen dishes to taste over the course of four hours. Time to block out the afternoon and get comfy.

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6
Da Graziella
Da Graziella
Restaurants, Pizza

Da Graziella

icon-location-pin Poissonnière

Who’s it for? Pizza connoisseurs who are forever in search of that Holy Grail: melt-in-the-mouth yet crispy dough.

What should I order? Neapolitan fried pizza.

How much? €11-19 for the pizza of your dreams.

We fell head over heels for this Neapolitan pizzeria, which replaced Vivant Cave. The interior of this former bird shop is delightful – think Art Nouveau tiling in a shades of emerald, chartreuse and lemon yellow. Pizza dough is beautifully proofed, gooey and wood fired to perfection. Toppings are top notch too: think San Marzano AOP tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil from Sorrento and anchovies from Cetara in Campania. This is the only pizzeria in Paris that does the Neapolitan speciality of fried pizza: fresh ingredients are placed on fried dough, which is then wood-fired. If you have room, try the dessert version, with homemade chocolate sauce.

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7
Restaurant Passerini
Restaurant Passerini
Restaurants, Italian

Restaurant Passerini

icon-location-pin 12e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Anyone who hasbeen to Rino, in Northern Italy. And pasta addicts, naturally.

What should I order? Anything that involves their fresh handmade pasta.

How much? The €24 weekday lunch menu is great value for money.

How could we leave Giovanni Passerini out of the top ten? One of our favourite Italians and purveyor of Paris’ best pasta, his cooking is precise, full of love and totally without airs and graces. The tripes all’amatriciana is something else too.

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8
Miznon
© Emmanuel Chirache
Restaurants, Turkish

Miznon

icon-location-pin Le Marais

Who’s it for? Pita devotees.

What should I order? Lamb kebab pita with orgasmic braised cauliflower.

Best buy? The €3.50 Tarte Tatin pita – caramelised apples stuffed in a pita. Heaven in a handful.

Chicken, fish, steak or veggie – roll up your sleeves and prepare to get messy with Miznon’s pita artistry. Décor is devilishly baroque, with fruit and vegetables overflowing from the shelves, a dancey playlist and cheery staff. It’s often rammed, but it is well worth the ten-minute wait. Trust us.

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9
Restaurants, Creative contemporary

Les Déserteurs

icon-location-pin Charonne

Who’s it for? Fun lovers and fans of Le Sergent Recruteur.

What should I order? A perfectly balanced dessert, like the cheesecake with delicate grapefruit sorbet.

How much? Set lunch is €30 or €49 in the evening.

If you haven’t yet had the chance to dine at this beautiful address: get there quick. Rumour has it, the place has been sold and will be closing down in several months. Daniel Baratier and Alexandre Céret (both ex-Sergent Recruteur) are part of the team and the cooking is pure, finessed and extraordinary. Don’t miss Thierry Delabre’s supernatural leavened bread – or a glance through the 300-strong wine list.

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10
Restaurants, Bistros

Le Servan

icon-location-pin Roquette

Who’s it for? Gourmets with a penchant for subtle small plates.

What should I order? The zazouski as an amuse-bouche, the tasty boudin noir wonton or Thai basil cockles.

When should I go? Lunch is best, when the set menu is €27.

These imaginative dishes come from the young Tatiana Levha (ex-Arpège and Astrance) and Bertrand Grébaut (Septime). Think raw cuttlefish with green mango and Patis chicken with white asparagus, a walnut crumb and chorizo. The setting is all gilded brass, ceiling mouldings and an open kitchen.

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11
Jin Paris japonais étoilé restaurant
© Thierry Richard
Restaurants, Japanese

Jin

icon-location-pin 1er arrondissement

Who’s it for? Sushi obsessives – or anyone after perfectionistic aesthetics.

What should I order? The sea urchin tongue sushi.

How much? It comes at a price – the cheapest menu is €95 at lunch.

This sushi-bar feel has a sober decor of imported Japanese wood, with nothing to distract the diner from dinner. There are only twelve seats, set around the chef's workstation, and it's here you eat and watch the work of chef Takuya Watanabe (Taku) – aloof and imposing, he already heads up four other restaurants in Sapporo. To be clear, you don't come to Jin for a boozy catch-up with your mates – all attention here is focused on the food. Taku and his chef's ritualised preparation is mesmeric, as they repeat their cutting and slicing motions with the precision of a couple of metronomes, working on fresh fish pulled from Japanese cypress-wood boxes or modelling sashimi by hand with translucent rice.

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12
Le Chateaubriand
Le Chateaubriand
Restaurants, Bistros

Le Chateaubriand

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Bon viveurs, who are willing to try raw produce.

What should I order? The brilliant Spanish goat’s cheese with stewed apple jam.

How much? Set menus are priced at €70 – which is reasonable for a Michelin-starred restaurant.

Self-taught Basque chef Iñaki Aizpitarte runs this stylish bistro, where cooking is at its most adventurous at dinner, with deconstructed dishes such as chunky steak tartare with a quail's egg, or asparagus with tahini foam and splinters of sesame-seed brittle. A much simpler (albeit cheaper) menu is served at lunch.

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13
© JC
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Quinsou

icon-location-pin 6th arrondissement

Who’s it for? Discerning diners, who like to know the provenance of what’s on their plate.

What should I order? The produce in the daily-changing menu is the star of the show: think Saint-Guénolé grey sea bream with pink French apples, beans and sage butter.

When should I go? For the €35 set lunch menu.

We love Quinsou for being daring, without a trace of pompousness. Chef Antonin Bonnet has a CV as long as his arm (Le Sergent Recruteur in Paris, The Green House in London and Languiole’s Michel Bras). Rustic, elegant and flavourful – Quinsou is more than worth its salt.

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14
Le Baratin
CC - Rex Roof
Restaurants, French

Le Baratin

icon-location-pin Belleville

Who’s it for? Offal addicts.

What should I order? Beef cheek – stewed with love.

When should I go? For the €19 lunch menu.

Star pastry chef Pierre Hermé visits this cheerful little bistro and wine bar high up in Belleville at least every two weeks to fill up on Raquel Carena's homely cooking with the occasional exotic twist. Typical of her style, which draws on her native Argentina, is a tuna carpaccio with cherries, roast Basque lamb with new potatoes and spinach, and hazelnut pudding. If the food weren't so fantastic, it would still be worth coming for the (mostly) organic wines. Le Baratin attracts gourmands from all over Paris, so be sure to book.

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15
© Tina Meyer
Restaurants, French

Les Pantins

icon-location-pin Paris et sa banlieue

Who’s it for? Fans of haute bistro cuisine.

What should I order? The grilled Basque octopus with garlic mousse, dill and raw beetroot.

When should I go? For lunch, when the set menus are €18-21.

Gleaming with fifties elegance, you can sink into these duck-egg blue banquettes seven days a week – which, in Paris, is a true bonus. This high-end bistro is reasonably priced, with Wahid Sahed (ex-Bristol) in the driving seat during the week and Antonin Mandel (of Shangri-La and Ze Kitchen Galerie fame) taking the reins at the weekend. Accompany strong, generous dishes with picks from Guillaume Maugain’s wine list (who was formerly at Verre Volé) – preferably on the huge terrace. Al fresco dining par excellence.

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16
Abri resto Paris
© Thierry Richard
Restaurants, Bistros

Abri

icon-location-pin Poissonnière

Who’s it for? Diners with one foot in Paris and one in Tokyo.

What should I order? The marinated Japanese mackerel, accompanied by almost transparent chopped vegetables.

When should I go? For the €26 set lunch menu, or the cult favourite tonkatsu sandwich – which is €13 from 10am to 5pm.


This pocket-sized restaurant next to Poissonière is known for one thing in particular: their multi-layered, super-stacked, millfeuille-esque sandwiches, put together by chef Katsuaki Okiyama. Think grilled bread, a deep and lovely sauce, a vegetable omelette, crusty breaded pork (‘tonkatsu’), sweet and sour cauliflower purée and soft cheese. The rest of the week, there are plenty more of the young Japanese chef’s talents to enjoy. His CV (Robuchon, Taillevent, Agapé) would be impressive on a far older chef, and against a bare décor, he makes the experience a perfect balance between France and Japan.

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17
© Deux fois plus de piment
Restaurants, Chinese

Deux fois plus de piment

icon-location-pin 11th arrondissement

Who’s it for? Spice fiends, of course.

What should I order? The spicy beef ràgu.

How much? The lunch menus are €8-12, starters from €4.20 and dishes are from €7.80.

Review coming soon.

Time Out says
18
<p>Les Arlots &copy;ZT</p>
Restaurants, Bistros

Les Arlots

icon-location-pin SoPi (South Pigalle)

Who’s it for? Proper bistro lovers.

What should I order? The to-die-for sausage and mash.

When should I go? For the €18-22 lunchtime menu.

Come for the super-friendly service and leave with a belly filled with love. The wine list is written with as much care and passion as the menu, putting the spotlight on small producers and natural wines. Les Arlots is enough to make you fall head over heels.  

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19
Le 975
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Le 975

icon-location-pin Epinettes

Who’s it for? Those who love French cooking, with a penchant for Japanese flavours.

What should I order? Iberian confit pork with spices, homemade mashed potatoes and rocket.

When should I go? For the unbeatable lunchtime menu – €16 for a mise en bouche, the dish of the day, coffee and sweets.

Review coming soon.

20
Le Dauphin
Le Dauphin
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Le Dauphin

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Fans of high-flying cuisine, without the price tag.

What should I order? French buttermilk and savory olive oil.

How much? Small plates start from €3.50 – but beware, they stack up quickly.

Review coming soon.

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21
tagine
© Alpha
Restaurants, Moroccan

Le Tagine

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Couscous addicts.

What should I order? The couscous special, with a range of different meats. Big up the merguez and the leg of lamb steeped in saffron mustard. Semolina is hand-rolled and super fine, accompanied by a mélange of vegetables: potatoes, carrots, turnip and courgettes.

How much? Natural wines are €5-8 by the glass, with bottles from €25.

We love the Arabian nights décor, cocktails (think curacao, fig liqueur, orange juice and mint cocktail), and the superb selection of natural wines. Plus the tagines, of course – which Yves Camdeborde says are the best in the city.

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22
Soya
Restaurants, Vegetarian

Soya

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? A veggie-organic-vegan palate, but also anyone most likely to say “vegetarian dishes are the worst”.

What should I order? A Thai lentil dahl wih watercress and alfafa sprouts, with a bowl of asparagus, carrots, peppers and tomatoes.

How much? Weekday lunch menus are €15-23, with bottomless tea. Weekend all-you-can-eat veggie brunch is €30.

Review coming soon.

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23
ruisseau burger paris
© Time Out / AW
Restaurants, American

Le Ruisseau

icon-location-pin Mairie du 18e

Who’s it for? Anyone who swears by PNY.

What should I order? The blue cheese burger, with melted bleu d’Auvergne.

How much? €13-15 for burger, fries and salad. €15 for two pot luck mini burgers or add €5 for supersized burgers.

We’ve loved Le Ruisseau since it opened. After some heated office debate, we decided Le Ruisseau should pip PNY to the post. Why? Located on a street corner, it comes alive at night, with all the action happening around the main counter bar. The long narrow terrace is beyond ideal on a beautiful day, the lager is decent and the service is professional, efficient and fun. The quality of the ingredients is a highlight too: buns are made fresh twice a day, beef is from Limousine cows grazed in the fields of Pas-de-Calais and the twice-cooked chips have a melting centre and super crispy edge. Burger bliss.

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24
Ze Kitchen Galerie
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Ze Kitchen Galerie

icon-location-pin 6th arrondissement

Who’s it for? Refined taste buds and lovers of colourful, hybrid gastro delights.

What should I order? Miso rabbit with harissa, artichokes, spinach and Swiss chard.

How much? The lunchtime menu is €41.

Review coming soon.

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25
Yoshinori
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Yoshinori

icon-location-pin 6th arrondissement

Who’s it for? Fans of beauty on their plates and on the walls.

What should I order? The confit duck foie gras, smoked eel and quince.

When should I go? For the €35-45 lunchtime set menu.

This vibrant tribute to French gastronomy is complemented by beautiful Japanese touches. Think edible flowers and a haven of limestone and bleached white beams.

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26
Vivant
Restaurants, French

Vivant

icon-location-pin Poissonnière

Who’s it for? Devotees of Pierre Touitou (ex-Pierre Gagnaire, Aux Deux Amis).

What should I order? Giant pasta tubes with spicy tuna ragù.

How much? €6 for small plates and at least fifteen wines from €6 by the glass.

Review coming soon.

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27
Gare au Gorille
Gare au Gorille
Restaurants, Creative contemporary

Gare au Gorille

icon-location-pin Batignolles

Who’s it for? Anyone in search of good food in the 17th arrondissement.

What should I order? Cod with mussels and Jura sausages.

When should I go? For the three-course €29 lunch menu.


As one of the only cool bistros in the 17th, Gare au Gorille oscillates between audacity and sophistication, with a daily-changing menu designed by Marc Cordonnier (ex-second in command to Betrand Grébaut). Prices are reasonable for this area: the lunch menu is €29 all in, while evenings are €39 for five dishes. The unique, globe-trotting wines are selected by Louis Langevin (ex-Septime).

Time Out says
28
Clown Bar
Restaurants, French

Clown Bar

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Interior design obsessives.

What should I order? Veal brains with tosazu sauce.

How much? Without a set menu or lunchtime deal, these small plates add up.


Despite super ex-Vivant chef Sota Atsumi leaving Clown Bar, it continues to be a classy spot, with even classier décor. Ewen Lemoigne’s 150-strong wine list is a highlight. Low point? The prices go up year on year.

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29
L'avant comptoir des cochons
Bars and pubs, Tapas bars

L’avant comptoir du marché

icon-location-pin Odéon

Who’s it for? Those of a porky persuasion.

What should I order? A glass of red and a buttered sausage open sandwich.

How much? €4-10 for small plates and €2-6 for desserts.

We are obsessed with the Bordier butter pats on the counter at L’Avant Comptoir du Marché and the corn bread is totally addictive. Wash the rich pork dishes down with natural wines by the glass. Thank you Yves Camdeborde!

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30
Restaurants, Chinese

Shang Palace

icon-location-pin Chaillot

Who’s it for? Anyone wanting a slice of the only Michelin-starred Chinese restaurant in France.

What should I order? The crispy-skinned Peking duck, served with rice pancakes and Hoisin sauce. Or the chef’s fried rice, an interpretation of Cantonese rice with Peking honey pork and slivers of egg yolk.

How much? The best deal is at lunch – which, at €58, is very accessible for a Michelin-starred address.

The décor at Shang Palace might as well be straight out of Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel – think exotic wallpapered elevators and waltzing wait staff in traditional Chinese costume. Canton and Huaiyang, provinces in southwestern China, inspire the eighty Michelin-starred dishes on the menu. Expect to be blown away by these heady yet refined flavours.

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31
Restaurants, Chinese

Boutique yam’Tcha

icon-location-pin Les Halles

Who’s it for? Anyone after posh bao buns that won’t break the bank.

What should I order? The Stilton and amareno cherry bao.

How much? €16 for five bao buns and all other dishes are reasonably priced.


Chef Adeline Grattard’s plump steamed bao buns are made with wheat flour and stuffed with whatever takes her fancy: comté, curry onions, vegtables, crab, Basque pork and Sichuan aubergine. Beyond delicious.

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32
Les Canailles Ménilmontant
© Jill Cousin
Restaurants, French

Les Canailles Ménilmontant

icon-location-pin 20th arrondissement

What should I order? The beef tongue carpaccio with gribiche sauce.

The team behind Les Canailles Pigalle are back with their second opus, this time not far from Père Lachaise. The menu features many of the same excellent dishes and it’s easy to feel at ease among the Maurice Chevalier posters, azure mosaic floor and exposed brick bar. Sebastien Guillo’s kitchen skills are sure to wow: starting with his famed beef tongue carpaccio with gribiche sauce. The thin slices of meat came pleasantly warm, with a generous serving of cold gribiche sauce made with hard-boiled eggs, chives, gherkins and parmesan. Light and tasty, it’s the kind of dish you’ll want to linger over. 

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33
© Jill Cousin
Restaurants, Japanese

Le Bien Venu

icon-location-pin 9th arrondissement

Who’s it for? Lucky hotel guests and donburi devotees.

What should I order? The spicy donburi curry with crispy vegetables.

How much? €16-19 for lunchtime menus or €10 per dish in the evening.

There’s a lot to love about this restaurant hidden at the back of Hôtel Bienvenue; its cosy atmosphere, its veggie-friendly Japanese fare, its natural wine list and the beautiful illustrations on the menu.

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34
© Le Villaret
Restaurants, Bistros

Le Villaret

icon-location-pin 11th arrondissement

Who’s it for? The foodie friend who’s always claiming to have found the best bistro in Paris.

What should I order? The melt-in-the-mouth braised beef en croute.

When should I go? For the €22-27 lunchtime set menu.

Review coming soon.

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35
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

David Toutain

icon-location-pin 7e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Disciples of Passard and Gagnaire.

What should I order? The smoked eel.

When should I go? For the €55 lunchtime menu.

Review coming soon.

Time Out says
36
Table
DR
Restaurants, French

Table

icon-location-pin 12e arrondissement

Who’s it for? A naturalist.

What should I order? Pineapple cooked in cane sugar juice on a spit.

How much? The lunchtime menu is €29, or €89 in the evening.

Review coming soon.

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37
Dilia
Dilia
Restaurants, Italian

Dilia

icon-location-pin Belleville

What should I order? Offal rigatoni with mint and pecorino.

Dilia is the closest you’ll get to an authentic Italian village without leaving the Périphérique. Michele Farnesi took the reins of this 20th arrondissement gem from her compatriot Simone Tondo a few years and has been steering the boat like a true captain. This is refined Italian cuisine served generously – every lunch offers a €17 set menu, made with super-fresh ingredients and always featuring a pasta dish. We tried the porchetta bruschetta with crushed tomatoes and perfectly fried yellow plaice with a zingy cucumber mayo and courgette salad. The textures were equally magnificent in an offal rigatoni dish with mint and pecorino.You know where to go for your next Italian staycation. 

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38
Caillebotte paris
Restaurants, Bistros

Caillebotte

icon-location-pin SoPi (South Pigalle)

Who’s it for? Pantruche regulars (it's run by the same team).

What should I order? Flash-steamed Roumégous oysters with lettuce broth.

How much? Lunchtime menu is €19 or €36 on evenings.


The bright décor at Caillebotte is bistro-inspired, with touches of Scandinavia; think open kitchen and pale wood. Its hearty dishes are thoughtful and surprising, without being disconcerting. Vegetables are from the family garden and the wines are a personal, beautiful selection.

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39
Claude Colliot
Restaurants, Bistros

Claude Colliot

icon-location-pin Le Marais

Who’s it for? Fans of hearty cuisine with no boundaries.

What should I order? Raw blue shrimp with a crunchy shimeji mushroom broth.

How much? Choose any five à la carte veggie dishes for €45.


Review coming soon.

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41
Biondi
Biondi
Restaurants, Fusion

Biondi

icon-location-pin Folie-Méricourt

Who’s it for? Barbecue junkies.

What should I order? Beef entrecôte with potatoes, confit shallots and chimichurri sauce.

How much? €16-20 for starters and €30-40 for mains.


Roll up meat lovers, this one will be right up your street. There’s one non-carnivorous dish on the menu (octopus) so it’s possibly not the best spot for a date with a vegetarian. Mains start at €30 so come with a healthy bank balance.

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42
Chez La Vieille
Restaurants, French

Chez La Vieille

icon-location-pin Les Halles

Who’s it for? Anyone craving grandma-style farmhouse cooking.

What should I order? The blanquette de veau, served in a Staub dish with carrots and mushrooms, the sauce of which you will have to finish every drop.

How much? It’s in the 1st arrondissment so prepare to dig deep: starters are €10-15 and mains are €20-25.

You can perch at the giant basement bar without booking or just come for a drink, while the ten-tabled dining room is warm and relaxed. Expect comfort food par excellence.

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43
Au Nouveau Nez
Restaurants, French

Au Nouveau Nez

icon-location-pin 11th arrondissement

What should I order? Gnudi with buffalo ricotta, orange flower water and sundried tomatoes.

Headed up by a Tuscan chef and a Neopolitan sommelier, Au Nouveau Nez took root in a former wine cellar and has now extended into a perfect little restaurant, decorated with apple green walls and mismatched furniture. The menu features two starters, two mains, two desserts – and that’s it. The yellow plaice with grilled endive and preserved lemon is divine, but it should come as no surprise – chef Alessandra Olivi only works with super high-quality ingredients from small producers. His gnudi (gnocchi-like dumplings stuffed with buffalo ricotta) were orange-scented with an umami hit from the sundried tomatoes and parmesan (€9). Serious bang for your buck. 

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44
<p>Clamato &copy;B.Shmuck</p>
Bars and pubs, Wine bars

Clamato

icon-location-pin Charonne

Who’s it for? Seafood lovers.

What should I order? Melt-in-the-mouth haddock with asparagus and red miso.

How much? Be warned, these perfect plates add up fast. €60 for seafood platters and €7-30 for small plates. Sustainably caught and perfectly cooked fish doesn’t come cheap.

Clamato’s interior is a mix of fisherman’s hut wood, concrete and steel, with a menu that changes with the tide. Ingredients are of unparalleled freshness and the wines are excellent. The only downside? It’s walk-ins only.

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45
Paris New York PNY paris burger
© Rémi Guénaire
Restaurants, American

Paris-New York

icon-location-pin Strasbourg-Saint-Denis

Who’s it for? Hard-to-please burgerphiles.

What should I order? A smoky blue: smoked pork belly, Stilton and confit onions, with twice-cooked crispy fries.

How much? A burger, fries or salad and drink is €15.50 at weekday lunchtimes.

PNY’s Oberkampf address is the best yet, bigger than the first PNY in Strasbourg Saint-Denis and with more experienced staff.

Time Out says
46
Yam'Tcha
Yam'Tcha
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Yam'Tcha

icon-location-pin 1st arrondissement

Review coming soon. 

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47
© Jill Cousin
Restaurants, Italian

Racines

icon-location-pin 2nd arrondissement

Who’s it for? Transalpine tastebuds, with a love of old-school bistros.

What should I order? The garganelli alla Genovese with pesto, walnuts and potato.

How much? There’s no set menu so get ready to flash your credit card.

Ex-Dilia chef Simone Tondo’s dishes are comforting grandma style, with some fiery additions. Make a beeline for the southern wines, like the Opi d’Aqui.

Time Out says
48
© Sur Mer
Restaurants, Seafood

Sur Mer

icon-location-pin 10th arrondissement

Who’s it for? Seafood fans, with a taste for the Spice Trail.

What should I order? Perfectly steamed cod with a broth of scallops, Swiss chard and pickled mushrooms.

How much? The two-course lunchtime menu (starter or dessert with a sandwich). The three-course dinner menu is €32.

The 28-year old Ugandan-Belgian chef Olive Davoux’s oceanic small plates are precise and globetrotting. The daily-changing menu include sandwiches made with Ten Belles or Thierry Breton bread and the evening dishes are more refined. Don’t miss the handpicked oysters: think Monsieur Jean-Paul’s Utah Beach and Cadoret de Bretagne.

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49
© Au Bon Coin
Restaurants, French

Au Bon Coin

icon-location-pin 18e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Lovers of the true Parisian bistro.

What should I order? Warm herring potatoes or the terrine de campagne.

How much? €3.60 for starters and €9 for the dish of the day.

Review coming soon.

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51
Restaurants, French

Elmer

icon-location-pin Arts et Métiers

Review coming soon. 

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53
© JC
Restaurants, Bistros

Eels

icon-location-pin 10th arrondissement

Who’s it for? Anyone with a thing for citrus flavours, herbs and spices.

What should I order? The smoked eel with matcha mousse.


The open kitchen at Eels is the room’s central focus, and the minimal décor is as on-trend as it comes – as we had expected from Adrien Ferrand, who was trained by William Ledeuil and shares his love of fresh herbs, citrus flavours and spices. A dish of eel pieces is ever-so-slightly smoky, with a cloud of foamed matcha and oxalis leaves. Grilled squid (€27) is served with spelt and watercress purée, and is made wedding breakfast-perfect with lemon and Thai basil leaves, cutting through the flavours beautifully. Desserts pack a punch too: think creamy coconut, pineapple and lime (€11), with a skilful balance of flavours. Eels – we’re ever so smitten.

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55
52 Faubourg Saint-Denis restaurant Paris
© Joan Bracco
Restaurants, French

52 Faubourg Saint-Denis

icon-location-pin Strasbourg-Saint-Denis

Who’s it for? All hours party people – it’s open from 8am to midnight.

What should I order? A deconstructed coq au vin, with chicken simmered over a fire, with potato, mushroom, bacon, garlic and herb purée.

This mult-faceted no-reservations establishment is great for a productive morning with your laptop, accompanied by Julhès croissants and an excellent Café Compagnon coffee. But it’s just as good for a raucous dinner with friends, with a concise menu and a well-priced wine list. The humble interior is all stripped wood and distressed walls, which is perfectly matched with the addition of chargers under every table.

Time Out says
56
Restaurants, American

Frenchie To Go

icon-location-pin Sentier

Who’s it for? Anyone who likes to tackle their doorstep sandwiches, rather than simply eat them.

What should I order? The Reuben sandwich.

Gregory Marchand, of the gastronomic Frenchie on the same street, is an expert in joyful, modern and accessible finger food. Super fresh dishes are anglo and American inspired: think hot dogs, fish and chips and lobster rolls. Grab a bacon sandwich, egg and cheese English muffin or granola for breakfast, while desserts are unmissable – double chocolate brownie or elegant cinnamon rolls. Coffee is sourced from l’Arbre à Café, the roastery just across the street.

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58
Restaurants, Korean

Hero

icon-location-pin Sentier

Who’s it for? Those who like Korean food with a side order of hip-hop.

What should I order? The sliced pork ssamjang bun. Or the famous yangnyeom fried chicken.

This trendy Korean joint is all concrete blocks, tiny succulents and pretty string lanterns. Don’t miss the cocktails.

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60
© HB
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

ERH Restaurant

icon-location-pin 1st arrondissement

Who’s it for? Franco-Japanese sakeophiles.

What should I order? Sakura-smoke foie gras (that’s the Japanese cherry wood), on toasted brioche with caramelised mango and balsamic vinegar reduction.

Right in the middle of Maison du Saké, Erh is a 500m2 former spa redecorated as a luxurious modern loft space under a gorgeous glass roof. The French-Japanese menu is designed by Keita Kitamura, trained at Pierre Gagnaire and Narisawa, the Tokyo establishment that is often named among the best restaurants in the world. The unique tasting menu is €65, including seven (not at all stingy) courses. Sip on mouthwatering wines or fruity, fizzy or rustic saké.

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61
Sunset
Bars and pubs, Cocktail bars

SUNSET

icon-location-pin Mairie du 18e

Who’s it for? 18th arrondissement dwellers in search of a new local.

What should I order? Homemade beef cheek ravioli with roasted and smoked carrots.

This Goutte d’Or address ticks all the boxes: a large heated terrace perfect for apero hour, a huge zinc bar and a cosy basement room for first dates. Expect seasonal small plates, washed down with well-priced cocktails, natural wines, locally-brewed beer or Lomi coffee. Prices are reasonable for the quality, with set menus during the week starting at €14.50. The kind of neighbourhood restaurant everyone dreams of.

Time Out says
62
© Jill Cousin
Restaurants, Fusion

Kitchen Ter(re)

icon-location-pin 5th arrondissement

Who’s it for? Mediterranean-style pasta fiends – or south-east Asian noodle nuts.

What should I order? Blésetto, spelt risotto with squid, Japanese aosa seaweed and shrim Tom Kha sauce.

Love at first taste: Roland Feuillas’ pasta in old-fashioned shapes with funny names (think girolette and dentelle de Cucugnan). The well-designed lunch menu is only €30 and the standout soups for starters are a must.

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64
<p>&copy; ZT</p>
Restaurants, Greek

Etsi

icon-location-pin 18e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Anyone craving a Mediterranean mezze: it's octopus, taramaslata and grilled vegetables a-go-go.

What should I order? The baklava, which stands to be the best in Paris.

Head to Etsi for well-thought out, fresh mezze dishes, like fries with feta. Greek wines come highly recommended – like the retsina, a white made with Tetramythos pine resin or the astonishing Akakies Amyndeon rosé. Our only complaint is the prices don’t quite match the serving size.

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65
Restaurants, Vegetarian

Krishna Bhavan

icon-location-pin Gare de l'Est

Who’s it for? Vegetarians in need of culinary inspiration.

What should I order? The cheese paratha (a popular Indian flatbread) with three delicious veggie curries (€8.50).

Krishna Bhavan Cail’s kitsch décor almost makes up for the elbow-to-elbow table arrangement. This northern Indian vegetarian menu is one of the best in Paris, and is all reasonably priced. Bliss without breaking the bank.

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66
Restaurants, Bistros

Polissons

icon-location-pin 18e arrondissement

Who’s it for? Fans of sophisticated bistro cuisine.

What should I order? The Kinder Surprise®-style chocolate bomb with vanilla mousse and caramel.

You can’t beat a €17-21 three course lunch menu, especially because the 9th offers scant bistro options. Romain Lamon (ex-Ritz and Hotel le Bristol) is a welcome addition to this corner of the Richer area. Décor is minimal Nordic with Scandinavian furniture, vintage chairs and clean lines.

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67
Fulgurances
Restaurants, Haute cuisine

Fulgurances

icon-location-pin Charonne

Who’s it for? Loyal diners with unfaithful palletes.

What should I order? The chef’s choice set lunch menu.

The concept here is quite unique: a new chef takes the helm every six months, with a second in command who waits in the wings.

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69
© Breizh Café
Restaurants, Crêperies

Breizh Café

icon-location-pin Le Marais

Who’s it for? Crepe purists.

What should I order? The Cancalasie, with potatoes, smoked herring and herring caviar.

This is the number one Parisian creperie. It’s the perfect Sunday night snug dinner destination and the ingredients are first-rate: Guémené Andouille sausage, organic buckwheat flour, ham (with absolutely no sodium nitrate), artisanal organic ciders like P’tit Fausset and Jean-Yves Bordier butter. Expect to be elbow-to-elbow with your fellow diners against the distressed wood décor. Just like Saint-Malo.

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70
Le Desnoyez
Restaurants, Bistros

Le Desnoyez

icon-location-pin Belleville

Who’s it for? Bon vivants who take big bites.

What should I order? The chicken liver, pork and veal terrine.

For such a refined, old-school menu, the prices seem positively bargainous. Choose from a daily-changing selection of three starters, two mains and two desserts, washed down with one of the trendy wine options.

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71
Bon Saint-Pourçain
Restaurants, Bistros

Le Bon Saint-Pourçain

icon-location-pin Odéon

Who's it for? Total restaurant romantics.

What should I order? Duck leg with fennel and whole asparagus in cream.

The new 2015 opening from the prolific restaurateur David Lanheur (also behind Vivant, Racinesand Racines 2), Le Bon Saint-Pourçain more than lives up to its predecessors. The intimate venue reflects the privileged air of its neighbourhood, with the peaceful charm of the beaux quartiers. It feels delightfully secluded in its position on the short Rue Servandoni, its midnight blue facade standing out between the Église Saint Sulpice and the Jardin du Luxembourg. The interior is more classic, with stone walls and white tablecloths and an open corner kitchen where chef Mathieu Techer puts the finishing touches to his exceptional dishes. Don't skip dessert either. We’ll be back for a special occasion.

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La cave de l'os à moelle ©ZT
Restaurants, Bistros

La Cave de l'Os à Moelle

icon-location-pin Javel

Who’s it for? Those with an appetite bigger than their budgets.

What should I order? The homemade terrine.

Thierry Faucher’s second restaurant is a rare find. Grab one of the giant wooden tables and get to know your neighbours, before getting stuck into the distinctly country bumpkin-style starters and the main dishes simmering at the back of the room. All-you-can-eat menus are €19 for a starter and main or main and dessert, or €25 for all three. If you do opt for dessert, fill your plate with rice pudding, île flottante, fruit salad, prunes in wine and chocolate cake.

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73
Restaurants, Chinese

Les Saveurs du Sichuan

icon-location-pin 14th arrondissement

Just a few steps from Alésia metro station is Les Saveurs du Sichuan, a temple to the traditional dishes and flavours of China’s Sichuan region. The luxe décor is a contrast the wallet-friendly prices: €16 for a three-course lunch, including vegetarian spring rolls and Sichuanese beef ragu. For those who want to order à la carte, there are other regional specialities like mapo tofu (€13), Sichuan pepper prawns (€18.50) and steamed fish straight from the market. .

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75
© JC
Restaurants, Chinese

Jixiao's buns

icon-location-pin 3rd arrondissement

Who’s it for? Comfort food fans.

What should I order? The sheng jian buns, bite-sized Shanghai-style soup dumplings.

With its tasty fillings and jaw-droppingly low prices, this soup dumpling joint ticks all the boxes. How do you eat them? Well, take a tiny bite from the corner of one of your buns, use the straw to slurp out the soup from the dumpling and pop the rest of it in your mouth. The meaty bao with black rice vinegar is so good you’ll burn your mouth.

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77
Restaurants, Japanese

Hakata Choten

icon-location-pin 1er arrondissement

Who’s it for? Japanese dining aficionados.

What should I order? Line the stomach for your ramen with the leek gyoza, which are some of the best in Paris.

Décor is an eighties-style red and black, while the menu sticks to classic tonkotsu ramen, with a rich 24-hour pork bone broth. Choose your broth level (our favourite is number one, for the right balance between richness and flavour), but don’t miss the lightly spiced gyoza either. These might be the best on this side of Japan.

Time Out says
78
Le Pantruche
Restaurants, French

Le Pantruche

icon-location-pin Saint-Georges

Who’s it for? The gourmets among gourmets.

What should I order? The black truffle risotto and the famous Grand Marnier soufflé.

Franck Baranger has made quite a mark on the Parisian food landscape. His to-die-for dishes require a lot of bread for soaking up the sauces, but make no mistake, you’ll be left practically licking the plate. It’s a little noisy at times but it’s worth it for the €17 three-course lunch or the €34 dinner. The service is efficient, breezy and smiley. One you’ll keep coming back to.

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79
Bob's Kitchen
Restaurants, Vegetarian

Bob's Kitchen

icon-location-pin 3rd arrondissement

Who’s it for? Your gluten-free or vegan friend.

What should I order? The vegetarian stew with brown fried rice, pickles, avocado and caramelised mushrooms, in coconut milk and peanut sauce.

How much? €3.50-14.50 for soups and dishes, €7 for salads.

Review coming soon.

Time Out says
80
Restaurants, Global

Palissade

icon-location-pin 10e arrondissement

Who’s it for? The easily bored.

What should I order? Beryx, pickleweed and daikon tartare.

How much? €18.50-22.50 for the weekday set lunch menu.

Led by a Japanese chef, this bar and restaurant is one for those wth a discerning palate. Sip on a cocktail made by the Mexican bartender, nibble on cuttlefish ink and charcoal bread before moving onto Jean-Paul Guernier’s Utah Beach oysters. This is a lesson in doing apéro with style. Portions aren’t massive and prices are quite high (especially for Belleville) if you don’t go for a weekday lunch.

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81
© Jill Cousin
Restaurants, Bistros

Bouillon Pigalle

icon-location-pin 9th arrondissement

Who’s it for? Anyone who wants to live the picturebook Paris dream.

What should I order? Everything. But especially the oeuf mayonnaise and beef bourguignon.

How much? Think €1.90 oeuf mayonnaise, €4.50 herring potatoes and a beef bourguignon under €10. Wine is equally wallet-friendly: a very drinkable côtes-du-rhône is €2.90 per glass, or €35 for a jeroboam.

A mix of Parisians and tipsy tourists hang out at this new-age Clichy brasserie. Think staff in black tie, red leather booths, white paper placemats for each of the 300-strong capacity. Jean-Luc Poujauran bread is more than welcome when you’ve struggled through the queue for a table (which can be up to two hours long). Service might be a little slow, but dishes come quickly and you really can’t argue with a classic Parian two-course dinner (with wine) for under €20. Long live the bouillon!

Time Out says
82
© Zaoka
Restaurants, Fusion

Zaoka

icon-location-pin 5th arrondissement

What should I order? The gua bao, steamed pillowy buns stuffed with melt-in-the-mouth braised pork belly.

Three minutes from rue Mouffetard, in the heart of the Latin Quarter, is a turquoise façade with frosted glass. Step into this little cocoon to see the two young chefs grafting over a tiny open kitchen to make dishes packed with interesting flavours, somewhere between haute-cuisine and street food. The gua bao, steamed buns stuffed with melt-in-the-mouth braised pork belly, elicit all kinds of appreciative moans. The pillowy bun is garnished with marinated mustard leaves and grilled, before being sprinkled with crushed peanuts and an astonishing mashed carrot vinegar. This Taiwanese-Chinese fusion is your new Friday night feed go-to - but don't bother without a reservation.

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83
© Tina Meyer
Restaurants, Bistros

Au Passage

icon-location-pin 11th arrondissement

Who’s it for? Someone who likes their bistro experience with a contemporary twist.

What should I order? Melt-in-the-mouth lamb tongue, with smoked eel cream and capers

How much? The menu is always changing, but dishes range from €5 to €25.

The devil is in the details here: Frank Zappa on the sound system, Opinel knives, a friendly, tattooed waiter and of course the dream team of young Texan chef Dave Harrison and the Swedish Mans Engberg. Tucked away from the hustle and bustle of boulevard Filles du Calvaire, Au Passage is a real go-to destination for oenophiles – and offalophiles.

Time Out says
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Restaurants, Japanese

Pontochoux

icon-location-pin Le Marais

Who’s it for? Anyone who thinks the only good Japanese dish is sushi.

What should I order? The Japanese fried chicken curry with tamago sauce

How much? €11-12.80 for mains, and potato croquettes for €2.

There are only eight seats and four tables in this pint-sized Japanese joint, but the squish is worth it for Mama Taeko’s legendary fried chicken curry.

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