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John Marshall

John Marshall

Articles (32)

The best painting classes in NYC

The best painting classes in NYC

For anyone wanting to unleash their inner Picasso, New York City offers any number of painting classes where you can master some of the same techniques used by art history’s most famous artists or just kick back, chill out and sip your favorite chardonnay as you swirl your brush around the canvas. We can’t guarantee that your work will find its way into the collection of one of NYC’s art museums, but we can say that you’re probably going to have a good time and maybe even learn something. If nothing else, discovering the ins and outs of the medium may give you a finer appreciation for the masterpieces you’ll see on your next tip to The Metropolitan Museum, MoMA or the Guggenheim. And lest you’re wondering where to find the class best suited to your particular talents or aspirations, well, wonder no more: Just check out our guide to the best painting classes in NYC. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best classes in NYC

The best road trips from NYC

The best road trips from NYC

We’re huge fans of all things NYC, but sometimes even we need a break from the city and all it entails. Fortunately, New York City provides one of the best bases in the country to use as a jumping-off point for some incredible day trips or even longer road trips. Whether you're taking someone special on a romantic getaway, or are looking to disconnect from your devices with a serious dose of nature, these road trips from NYC serve as an ideal weekend getaway. Once you’ve explored all five boroughs, there are loads of scenic drives, charming towns, hikes and gorgeous natural scenery to explore. Each destination offers a nice counterbalance to the frenetic pace of the city. Maybe you're looking to escape the heat of NYC in the summer, or you’re just wanting to discover a nearby destination you've never been to before. Here are the best road trips from New York City, from the most scenic corners of New England to charming Catskills enclaves. If these trips spark an infatuation with the open road, opt to go cross-country and check out the best road trips in America. RECOMMENDED: Find more weekend getaways RECOMMENDED: The best treehouse Airbnbs near NYC RECOMMENDED: The best Airbnb cabins near NYC RECOMMENDED: The best beach houses near NYC

The best Halloween stores in NYC

The best Halloween stores in NYC

It’s the spookiest time of year, and if you’re like us, you’re ready to deck the halls with skeletons and bats and all things creepy and crawly. Finding the right costume is key too, and it’s never too soon to start shopping. Where to go for the best seasonal supplies? A Halloween store in NYC will have everything you need, and we’ve compiled a list of the best. Here you’ll find costumes of all sorts, excellent creepy decor and other Halloween knick knacks you’re surely going to want. Once you’re set with Halloween trimmings, get in the spirit by checking out a haunted house or all the NYC-area Halloween events on tap. You can even pay a visit to some of the city’s real-life haunted places. But before all that, make sure your costume is on point and your decorations are spot on with a trip to the best Halloween stores in NYC.

The 12 best Angelina Jolie movies

The 12 best Angelina Jolie movies

At this point, Angelina Jolie is perhaps better known as a humanitarian and all-around ultra-famous person than an actor. She’s stingy with her roles these days, and doesn’t always choose material worthy of her abilities. But make no mistake: she’s one of Hollywood’s highest-paid stars for a reason. No matter what she appears in – whether it’s a prestige drama or schlocky action vehicle – you may not walk away remembering the movie, but you always remember her. These 13 roles represent the best of Angelina Jolie. Recommended: 🔥 The 100 best movies of all-time💣 The 101 best action movies of all-time🦸 All the Marvel movies ranked from worst to best

The 13 best Harrison Ford movies

The 13 best Harrison Ford movies

Suddenly, Harrison Ford is in his ninth decade (he turned 80 in July) and everyone feels a whole lot older. Then again, part of his on-screen appeal came via his natural gift for seeming that bit slyer, cooler and more savvy than everyone else in the room, archeological dig site, Death Star or presidential airliner – so perhaps he’s always been eighty-something on the inside. Since breaking through with bit parts in American Graffiti and The Conversation (even his minor roles are in masterpieces), he’s rarely put a foot wrong in the roles he’s taken and films he’s picked. Who else can lay claim to playing three of the most iconic characters in cinema history? Here’s his finest, most evergreen performances to revisit. 

The best Veterans Day songs

The best Veterans Day songs

Veterans Day is a holiday dedicated to honoring those who have served in the United States Armed Forces. But like 4th of July, Memorial Day and, to an extent, Labor Day, it’s also a time to reflect on what it means to be American. This list of the best Veterans Day songs touches on those themes of patriotism and sacrifice, reflecting the breadth of the American experience, past, present and future. Some of these songs are anthemic and exuberant, whereas others offer a more thoughtful (and perhaps even slightly critical) meditation on what it means to be an American. They’re songs to play with a kind of conscious pride as we celebrate the USA without glossing over its faults and inequalities. Quite simply, the best Veterans Day songs will make you feel something deep inside. RECOMMENDED:🇺🇸 The best patriotic songs⚡️ The best songs about power💫 The best inspirational songs🎸 The best classic rock songs🎉 The best party songs

Find the best ornament shop in NYC

Find the best ornament shop in NYC

So you’ve picked out your Christmas tree (maybe you even cut your own at a Christmas tree farm) and managed to get it set up properly. Now it’s time for decorations. While we all aspire to achieve the kind of ornamental excellence displayed by the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, we know that's a bit of a stretch. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try. Lights and ornaments make or break a holiday tree, and we have the spots to check out for all your tree and hall-decking needs. If you’re looking for the best ornament shop in NYC, look no further: these shops have all the holiday goods, from twinkly little balls to shiny new tree-toppers. Whether you’re on the hunt for a whole new set of ornaments for a themed tree or looking for a few baubles to complement your holiday keepsakes, these shops have plenty of options for you to browse. Check them out to get inspired, then keep the holiday spirit going with the best NYC caroling, ice skating, sledding and holiday lights. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Christmas in New York

The most gorgeous libraries in NYC

The most gorgeous libraries in NYC

Whether you're a bookworm or an architechture addict, you're certain to fall in love with the most stunning NYC libraries. Because you have to admit: Libraries are some of the most beautiful NYC buildings to visit. Gotham has no shortage of great architecture, but our libraries make for some of the most interesting lesser-known NYC attractions. One of the best things to do in Manhattan is visit the New York Public Library, which ranks as one of the most famous book dens in the world. But there are plenty more lesser known—yet equally jaw-dropping—libraries worth getting to know. From Jefferson Market to the Morgan Library, these are the most gorgeous libraries in NYC. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to New York attractions

The best NYC hotels for a staycation

The best NYC hotels for a staycation

Have you ever had a staycation right here in NYC? With the advent of apps like Hotel Tonight, more and more New Yorkers are taking a break from their pads (and perhaps their roommates) and booking a night in the city’s best hotels. But with more than 250 to choose from, how do you decide which one will give you the best staycations? Whether you’re looking for the best dishes, the wildest parties or the best spas to lounge around in, we’ve pinned down the right place for your staycation. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best hotels in NYC

The best smoke shops in NYC

The best smoke shops in NYC

At a smoke shop in NYC, you can find anything you need to satisfy your smoking needs. These are the best tobacco stores and vape shops in the city, so head here the next time you want to light up (or find an alternative to cigs). Whether you want to look classy AF at a cigar bar or you’re already shopping for a new bong for 4/20 events, you should know the choice smoke shops in New York. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to shopping in NYC

The best organic grocery stores in NYC

The best organic grocery stores in NYC

It can be difficult to avoid New York’s dollar slices and food trucks, but organic grocery stores are here for you when you crave freshness. To help satisfy your need for clean eats, we’ve assembled a list of New York’s best organic grocery stores and health food stores so you can keep your insides pristine even when it’s a grimy grind outside. Don’t forget that healthy food can be delicious, too. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to shopping in NYC

The cheapest car services in NYC right now

The cheapest car services in NYC right now

Getting a quick, cheap ride when you need one is essential to New Yorkers. And the recent advent of ride apps has made it even easier to get an efficient lift with good value. But in an increasingly crowded market, which apps for New York City are really the easiest on your wallet? Whether you’re planning a weekend getaway or just want the easiest NYC commute possible after work, we found the best ones to download. Don’t just take our word for it—the app Open Street Cab, created by Cambridge University computer scientists, compares the prices offered by most of these services for your particular road trips or visits to the best New York attractions. Read on for a definitive list of the cheapest available car services and their pricing structures. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to cheap things to do in NYC

Listings and reviews (51)

Pure Tanning

Pure Tanning

If you want consistently bronze skin and a good value, this spot will hook you up—there are multiple package deals for spray tans ranging from one to 10 sessions, and even more options for custom tans. And for $79 per month, you can sign up for a Platinum Membership here and get unlimited access to both spray and bed tanning.

Gotham Glow Airbrush Tanning

Gotham Glow Airbrush Tanning

While this joint only offers spray tans, the employees are gifted painters—and deliver a thoroughly au natural look. Don’t worry about leaving here with an orange complexion or anything resembling those orange streaks you had after attempting self tanner at home.

O’live Organic Spa

O’live Organic Spa

The prevailing atmosphere at this location is one of relaxation and sophistication, with wrought iron furnishings (including candelabras) and a vaguely European feel. The spray tans here are organic, and as a day spa, this spot also offers massages.

Bronze Boutique & Spa

Bronze Boutique & Spa

This pamper-perfect locale has top-notch tanning offerings—plus manicures, waxing and pretty much anything you would want from the best spas in NYC. A joint nail salon and tanning salon that gets your beautifying done in one shot? We’re sold.

Urban Tanz

Urban Tanz

This spot sells both UV and airbrush tans, giving the best New York beaches a fierce competition. It also offers group packages, in case you want the whole gang to glow before a night out.

Park Slope Tanning

Park Slope Tanning

If you’d rather not sprawl out in Prospect Park next to loud families picnicking or twentysomethings ineptly playing Frisbee, head here for a faux glow. You can also get a free tan with the purchase of a (generously sized) lotion kit.

Sunspan

Sunspan

This tanning salon provides the option to stand up or lie down while you soak up some rays. It also has low-intensity beds if you’re a fake-tan newbie or are aiming for just sun-kissed instead of Ross Geller levels of orange.

LS Men’s Clothing

LS Men’s Clothing

Back in 1954, this shop’s owners were minting their haughty heritage at haberdasheries on Madison Avenue. They are still around today because they prioritize the high quality of the older world stuff found at vintage clothing stores without sacrificing new trends and technology.

Proper Suit

Proper Suit

This franchise has locations everywhere from Portland to Chicago. In New York, the Flatiron storefront employs two resident Fit Specialists, Melissa Watson and Richard Alan Hall, both of whom will meet with you and design something suave and sharp just for you. Just give them a ring to schedule your hour-long fitting whenever, uh, suits you.

Bhambi’s Custom Clothiers

Bhambi’s Custom Clothiers

For the past 40-odd years, father-and-son team Lal and Harry Bhambi have been making sure every single hand-sewn garment under their banner is made precisely to look attractive. When you pick up garbs from them, you have the advantage of their veteran touch.

Video Free Brooklyn

Video Free Brooklyn

Movie guru Aaron Hillis and his wife, Jennifer Loeber, curate this Brooklyn boutique, which they furnish with the very best in film. For a regular dose of his tastemaker talk, check out Aaron’s popular podcast, DVD Is the New Vinyl.

VideoRoom

VideoRoom

Since 1978, this spot has been catering to New Yorkers’ cinematic cravings. Nowadays, it stocks more than 17,000 titles (which is, in case you were wondering, more than triples the current selection on Netflix). Plus, for $3 a month, you can become a Gold Member—that means free delivery and pick up.

News (17)

The 12 coolest things not currently on display in NYC museums

The 12 coolest things not currently on display in NYC museums

One of the biggest advantages of living in (or visiting) this city is access to the art museums. And it’s certainly a gift to be able to see master works in the best museum exhibitions—but what happens to the city’s best paintings when they’re taken off the wall? Sometimes they go into storage, sometimes they move to a different country and sometimes they disappear forever—find out where our favorite art formerly on display in New York has gone (and hope it comes back soon).   1. Three Flags, Jasper Johns, at the Whitney Museum of American Art Jasper Johns is most famous for his 1954 painting Flag, a rustic depiction of the Star-Spangled Banner that he said came to him in a dream. Three years later, he created Three Flags, a further mimesis on the same subject—one that deconstructs the American flag as a symbol and accentuates its aesthetic merits in a single artistic gesture. 2. Turning Road at Montgeroult, Paul Cézanne, at the Museum of Modern Art When we think of Paul Cézanne, we often think of apples greeting our eyes—he’s probably best known for his fruity still-life paintings. But this piece doesn’t fit that bill: In contrast, it’s a moody rendering of a house on a hill. This was the last painting Cézanne made while in the small French village of Montgeroult before he returned to his hometown of Aix-en-Provence, where he would reside until his death in 1906. 3. Mummy of Nesiamun, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Ancient Egypt produced remarkable pieces of art with rem

The five most gorgeous libraries in NYC

The five most gorgeous libraries in NYC

While the advent of the Internet has meant public libraries are not quite as popular as they once were (sniff), there are still very many in New York that are gorgeous places to read and study. Yes, you can download over 300,000 books on your phone, but wouldn’t you rather sit somewhere pretty and quiet to read?   1. New York Public Library This iconic location, proudly guarded by regal-looking marble lions, is among the city's most ornate public spaces. And now that the gorgeous Rose Reading Room has reopened, this wins the beauty contest, hands down.   A photo posted by David Beahm (@davidssnaps) on Oct 13, 2016 at 5:34am PDT     2. The Morgan Library This lavish location, originally the private library of J.P. Morgan Chase, was first dedicated to bookish pursuits in 1910, and it now includes a museum and scholarly research center.   A photo posted by The Morgan Library & Museum (@themorganlibrary) on Oct 10, 2016 at 4:59am PDT     3. New York Public Library of the Performing Arts Whether you’re looking for some worthwhile literature on your favorite ballroom dancer or would rather gawk at beautiful people, this library will not disappoint.   A photo posted by Brad Romano (@bradromano) on Aug 16, 2016 at 3:18pm PDT     4. Jefferson Market Library While the building was first a courthouse, the Jefferson Market Library has been an important part of the Greenwich Village community for more than four decades. Also, it looks like a freakin’ castle.   A

The best corn mazes near New York City

The best corn mazes near New York City

What makes the corn maze exciting? Is it that they remind us of prowling monsters or a crazed, axe-wielding Jack Nicholson? Maybe it’s that they’re so similar to crop circles (conspiracy?) and can be even scarier than haunted houses. In any case, corn mazes are one of the best things to do in the fall (albeit also a good way to get lost), and they’re popping up everywhere. Here are the best ones near New York—the cream of the crop, you might say.      RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Halloween in NYC     Queens County Farm Museum Every year, several sights are selected to host the Amazing Maize Maze, a series of themed corn mazes designed by the American Maize Company. It has graced the grasses of the Queen County Farm Museum for years—a site that dates back to 1697. And, at 47 acres, it compromises New York City’s largest tract of remaining farmland. 75-30 Little Neck Parkway, Floral Park, NY   Happy Day Farm Each year, a new shape is carved into 10 acres of labyrinthine delight at this New Jersey farm. For 2016, the maze is shaped to form the seal of Rutgers University, which is currently celebrating its 250th anniversary.  97 Daum Road, Manapalan, NJ   Ellms Family Farm This year marks the 100th anniversary of Saratoga Springs, and the town is celebrating in predictably pastoral style. Ellms Family Farm provides some cornier diversions, and its grounds include seven separate mazes, not all of which are actually made from corn—for example, the Hedge Maze claims to be a relaxing

This giant chocolate expo is returning to New Jersey

This giant chocolate expo is returning to New Jersey

Perhaps you enjoy chocolate. Perhaps you enjoy it so much, you’ve long hoped to consume it on an extraordinary level—like the bearer of a Golden Ticket at Willy Wonka’s factory, but with less personal risk.   If that sounds like you, then set your sights on the Garden State. Next month, the Chocolate Expo will be held at the New Jersey Convention Center in Edison on Sunday November 13 from 10am until 7pm.   Attendees will get to sample and buy all manner of chocolate—we’re talking gelato, brownies, fudge, cheese and whatever chocolate-y things you can imagine. Around 50 vendors (many of which are local) will provide the sweet stuff.   As if that weren’t reason enough to go, there will be celebrity chefs who have run the gamut of food-based reality TV shows with alarming names (Cupcake Wars, Hell’s Kitchen, etc.).   Oh, and there’s a bar, and tickets start at just $10—see you there.   The polls are open! Vote for your favorite spots that deserve a Love New York Award.

The first map to include New York harbor is also the most expensive map ever

The first map to include New York harbor is also the most expensive map ever

The oldest map of North America—including New York—is slated to go on sale at TEFAF, an Amsterdam-based arts fair, for a cool $10 million. Of course, the vintage map is basically completely inaccurate, but it’s still cool, right?   Here’s the history of the map: In 1531, a Genoese cartographer named Vesconte Maggiolo sketched out the first known map of America’s eastern seaboard on goatskin parchment. This was a few years after Giovanni da Verrazzano sailed into New York Bay, becoming the first European to see the Hudson River. (Henry Hudson, who arrived some 80 years after, gets all the fame and glory. Not fair.) Some historians think Maggiolo must have been a shipmate of Verrazzano, but there is no direct evidence for this claim.   At any rate, Verrazzano has been largely forgotten, and an attempt in the ‘70s to reintroduce him to the collective memory of New York failed miserably—the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge is a misspelling of his name (there are supposed to be two Zs). While a campaign to correct the typo of the beautiful bridge launched this June, it’s gathered little support.   And though there are a comedy of errors on Maggiolo’s map—including the non-existent Sea of Verrazzano and unicorns—it is a significant historical document nonetheless. If it sells for $10 million, it will be the most expensive map ever. And hey, it’s still more realistic than that subway map with the Second Avenue subway on it.   The polls are open! Vote for your favorite spots that deserve a L

Apply for an apartment in Brooklyn’s tallest building for $833 a month

Apply for an apartment in Brooklyn’s tallest building for $833 a month

You read that right. You can cop an apartment in Brooklyn’s tallest building, located downtown at 333 Schermerhorn Street. The Hub, as it’s called, is offering 150 of its 750 apartments for affordable rates.   Photograph: Courtesy Dattner     While the official price points are not yet released, apartments that meet this designation range from $833 to $1,082 per month for a studio (there are 46), which can you apply for so long as your annual income is in the range of $29,898 to $38,100. There are also 85 one-bedrooms and 19 two-bedrooms available, which will cost $895 and $1,082 a month, respectively.   The 610-foot building, located in Downtown Brooklyn and developed by the Douglas Steiner firm, will include a swimming pool a gym, a terrace and a children’s playroom. The deadline to apply for its affordable units is December 15, 2016.   But beware: if you land one of these pads, you won’t be able to call your home part of the tallest building in Brooklyn for long—two other buildings, one at 340 Flatbush Avenue and another tower at 9 Dekalb Avenue—will both surpass its height when they completely re-do the skyline in the next few years.   The polls are open! Vote for your favorite spots that deserve a Love New York Award.

FiDi now has as many millennials as Williamsburg

FiDi now has as many millennials as Williamsburg

Eat your heart out, Williamsburg. The millennials have moved on. (Sort of.) According to a recent survey conducted by the Downtown Alliance, 30,000 people between the ages of 18 to 44 now call Lower Manhattan home. The report indicated that this figure was more than the amount in both the East Village and Williamsburg, although the latter neighborhood does have nearly the same number of millennials, so it’s a close race.   Approximately 70 percent of Downtown residents (that’s below Chambers Street) are now considered millennials—at least by the Downtown Alliance. According to their report, the median income of this group is around $160,000 annually, and they spend near $356 million on things categorized as entertainment.   None of this is terribly surprising—there has been an aggressive campaign to educate New Yorkers about how cool Lower Manhattan is. (You may have seen the posters screaming about how Questlove lives there.)   So does that mean FiDi is the new Brooklyn? Not quite. Yes, the High Line of the Financial District did just open this summer. But here’s the reality of young people moving to Lower Manhattan: They are there because, for several years now, the rents have been cheaper than in many other parts of the borough. These residents choose this area for its price, not its scene. Sorry, FiDi.   The polls are open! Vote for your favorite spots that deserve a Love New York Award.

There are back-to-back ramen festivals in NYC next week

There are back-to-back ramen festivals in NYC next week

This is the 36th year of the JAPAN Festival, an annual celebration of Japanese culture and its intersection with New York. There are precisely two reasons you should definitely check it out next week: ramen and more ramen.   JAPAN Fes will include not one but two nights where you can get your fill of these spectacular noodles. After the first fest, you can go back and gobble up some more Japanese food the next day.   On Sunday October 16, the Fall Fes & Ramen Competition will be held on the Upper West Side from 10am to 6pm and will conclude with the attendees voting on the best bowl served that day. To try some yourself, stop by Broadway between 92nd and 94th Streets.   Then, on Monday October 17, the Japan Fes Midtown Bazaar will be at 4 West 43rd Street from 11am to 9pm. The competitors from the day prior will be selling bowls of their ramen for an easy five bucks each. There will also be sake and beer to drink, performances to watch and more ramen to devour, of course.   The polls are open! Vote for your favorite spots that deserve a Love New York Award.

Seven things you can’t have because you live in NYC

Seven things you can’t have because you live in NYC

For all that living in New York has to offer, there are a lot of sacrifices that accompany it. Sure, you get 24-hour restaurants, Broadway shows and that insane skyline view that still impresses even the most jaded New Yorkers every once in a while. But we’ve had to make some cuts to make it here. Read on for a list of things you have to give up if you want to live here. 1. An automobileThe average cost of parking in NYC is about $430 a month (that’s $5,160 a year). Sure, some New Yorkers from Staten Island or Queens are able to have a car, but the daily hassles they face—from daily traffic jams to opportunistic graffiti—probably mean they wish they didn’t. In any case, none of us can have a car in the traditional American sense of a liberating portal to the open road (at least until we escape to upstate New York). 2. Cheap shoesIf you buy cheap shoes in New York, you’re going to buy a lot of them. No other city is as hard on your footwear. From clomping up subway stairs to walking along a flower bed to avoiding a pool of what you think is vomit—God, you hope it’s just vomit. 3. Really big dogsWe love our dogs in New York. But those of us who can’t afford a personal dog trainer or don't have a multi-story penthouse also can’t afford to keep a large dog. Or—at the very least—we shouldn’t try. Because no dog cares about how trendy his neighborhood is or how near he is to choice brunch spots. 4. A pool tableThe idea of a rec room is not something New Yorkers are familiar with—th

Apartments in Brooklyn and Queens are the most expensive they’ve ever been

Apartments in Brooklyn and Queens are the most expensive they’ve ever been

As much as we hate to admit it, rent continually gets more expensive, especially in New York. But twice this year, Manhattan rents actually declined, and the median rent is now $3,396 per month, or 1.2 percent lower than last quarter. However some of the outer boroughs are setting sales records—specifically, Brooklyn and Queens have never been this expensive. Time to start entering those affordable housing lotteries, people.   In Brooklyn, for example, the median price for a home increased by 8.7 percent and is now up to $735,000; the average sales price also increased by 14.8 percent, up to $983,511. Both jumps are new records for the borough. Yay….   Housing in Queens is also soaring in price. Median home sales there are up by 10.7 percent ($499,000), and the average price increased by almost eight percent ($562,216). And—you guessed it—both broke the current record.   But perhaps the most jarring statistic is that luxury properties in Brooklyn (read: the top 10 percent of the market), are being sold at an average of $3 million. That’s 25 percent higher than last year alone. If the price of luxury homes is changing that fast, you can bet the feeling of the neighborhood is changing, too. The new Apple Store and Whole Foods in Williamsburg aren’t helping, either. So does this mean Manhattan is the new Williamsburg?     The polls are open! Vote for your favorite spots that deserve a Love New York Award.

2,000 golden daffodils to be planted in Hell’s Kitchen to honor 9/11 victims

2,000 golden daffodils to be planted in Hell’s Kitchen to honor 9/11 victims

Stay gold, New York. After the attack on the city in 2001, New Yorkers for Parks launched the Daffodil Project as a 9/11 memorial. Since 2001, the advocacy group for public spaces has overseen the distribution of free golden daffodils. On October 22, the Daffodil Project will return to its inaugural site at DeWitt Clinton Park in Hell’s Kitchen, where it plans to plant 2,000 new flowers. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the 9/11 Memorial and Museum in NYC CultivateHKNY, a Hell’s Kitchen community organization, will supply the bulbs and host the event. It’s hoping to recruit New Yorkers to help with the project, so if you want to volunteer, head to the park between 10am and 1pm. (You’ll get refreshments as thanks!) The gesture is meant to honor the victims of 9/11 and is responsible for the millions of bright yellow blossoms that show up in the city every spring. In support of the movement, former mayor Michael Bloomberg actually declared the daffodil New York City’s official flower in 2007. The polls are open! Vote for your favorite spots that deserve a Love New York Award.

Seven secrets of Central Park that you don’t know about

Seven secrets of Central Park that you don’t know about

Sure, you know that Central Park is the biggest park in Manhattan, but you don’t know all the lesser-known spots hidden in its winding paths and mysterious forests. There are secret gardens, relics from the 1800s and tricks to help you not get lost while trying to walk crosstown. After stopping by the secret section that just opened after 82 years, go on a scavenger hunt to find these seven things. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Central Park, New York 1. There’s an artifact from 1811 There’s a rock in Central Park with a large metal bolt protruding from it. The story? It’s believed that this is one of the original survey bolts from the Commissioner’s Plan of 1811, when the New York City grid was first mapped out. There are none anywhere else in the entire city, as these bolts marked where two streets would intersect. But because Central Park was added to the plan later, the bolt remains (so the legend goes). 2. You can orient yourself with the lampposts Here’s what you do: On each light post in Central Park, there are four numbers. The first two indicate the nearest cross street, and the second set tells you if you’re on the east or west side—odd means west, even means east. Easy! 3. There are the decayed ruins of an old tavern Behind the Conservatory Garden at 105th Street, there are the dilapidated remnants of a century-old stone structure. Today, these ruins are called McGown’s Pass, named for McGown’s Pass Tavern, which closed in 1915. Before that, there was the Academy of St

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