Toku Nori
Photograph: Toku Nori

Best new restaurants in Singapore: June 2024

New food haunts to dine at this month

Adira Chow
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Whether we like it or not, June is upon us. As we enter the halfway mark of the year, we also welcome plenty of promising joints that have sprung up across the island. From a classy Korean establishment headlined by a three-Michelin-starred chef, to (even) more pizza joints by illustrious pizzaiolos, and a new spot serving Japanese handrolls, there’s much to be excited – and hungry for – as we ring in the second half of this year. Here are our picks of the best new eateries to dine at this June. 

RECOMMENDED: The 50 best restaurants in Singapore you must try and The 50 best bars in Singapore

Hot new restaurants and cafés to dine at this June

  • Korean
  • Jurong West

Korean chef Corey Lee is known for his flagship restaurant Benu in San Francisco which has three Michelin stars, making him the world’s first Korean chef with the accolade. This June, he will be collaborating with the Korean automobile conglomerate Hyundai to unveil his first restaurant in Southeast Asia, Na Oh. The farm-to-table will be housed in the new, futuristic Hyundai Motor Group Innovation Centre at Lakeside. It will tap on the building’s two-storey vertical smart farm that produces over 30kg of fresh produce daily. While a menu has not been released, Chef Lee has stated that Na Oh will be a “casual family restaurant”. Guests can expect exquisite and delicate hansik dishes executed with modern flair while drawing inspiration from traditional Korean cooking techniques.

  • Italian
  • Raffles Place

Among the many renowned pizza establishments that have popped up recently, we have Il Clay Supper Club – the new Italian-Mediterranean outfit by acclaimed chef Ciro Sorrentino. It has bagged many awards, and most recently made it on the 50TOPpizza Italia Guide. Glitzy art deco meets modern chic in this restaurant, and its interiors are as vibrant as the plates it serves. Get started with the burnt roasted cabbage ($18) and coppa ham with puff bread ($25), before you wolf down slices of the bestselling Pizza Napoletana ($38) and Regina Margherita ($28). These pizzas (only available till 6pm) are crafted with 48-hour proofed dough to achieve a moist yet airy crust. Still hungry? The restaurant whips up a unique cajun oyster pasta ($32) with garlic, cocktail onion, and light cream that’s sure to satiate.

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  • Japanese
  • Tanjong Pagar

Singaporeans seem to be big fans of Japanese handrolls, but not so much of its price tag. At Toku Nori, the restaurant offers a set menu of five handrolls ($38) with the option to add on a flight of sake pairings ($18). Nom on lighter, cleaner-tasting seafood to start, before progressing to fattier cuts of sashimi, with premium ingredients like Hokkaido scallop with yuzu kosho, hamachi with nikiri glaze, and engawa with miso glaze. If you’re after a more luxurious experience, top up to enjoy the signature uni handroll ($32), adorned with caviar and gold leaf flakes; or go for the rich seared foie gras handroll ($16) brushed with a garlic soy glaze and a touch of spicy leek. On the cooked food section, Toku Nori offers twists on izakaya classics like the chicken ribs ($14) in place of the regular chicken karaage. The dish uses a specific cut of bone-in chicken thigh for a mix of textures, and comes topped with a sweet yaki sauce glaze.

  • Italian
  • Tanjong Pagar

Adding to the Italian restaurant counter, Fortuna Singapore – the Asian branch of the popular Sydney establishment – is set to debut this month. Dubbed Singapore’s first Sicilian-Neapolitan restaurant, the joint brings together renowned pizzaiolo Giorgio Sorce who’s ranked #87 worldwide, together with Chef Omar Tutino who trained under the Michelin-starred Masterchef Antonio Cannavacciuolo. Menu items to look forward to include the homemade spaghetti with mazzara king prawns ($38), cooked perfectly al-dente, topped with breadcrumbs, and doused with an addictive bisque. 

The pizzas here are fermented for 50 hours in-house, and all your quintessential Italian classics are represented, from Marinara (from $22), Margherita (from $23), Diavola (from $25) and the likes. And you simply can’t leave without trying the fried gambero and stracciata pizza ($38). The dough is gently fried and then cooked in the oven again to achieve an extra crunchy texture, before it’s topped off with shrimps, cheese, pesto, tomatoes, a cured egg yolk, and lemon zest.

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  • Indonesian
  • Rochor

Among the crowd of glamorous restaurant debuts, we have the humble Waroeng Anak Indo which quietly sprouted up in Haji Lane last month, and managed to rally a solid fan base in just a few weeks. The casual, friendly Indonesian street food joint blasts all-time favourite Indonesian hit songs while serving up warm, comforting bowls of mi bakso (an Indonesian noodle soup dish with beef meatballs) and bakmi (a wheat-based noodle dish). Regulars rave about the Bakso Anak Indo ($8) which comes with homemade beef broth, beef balls, bawang goreng and noodles; as well as the Bakmi Anak Indo ($8) which has mee kia topped with sweet soy chicken, bok choy and drizzled with garlic oil. Make sure to add to your chosen dish a dollop of the housemade sambal for a much-needed spicy kick.

  • French
  • Sentosa

Located in the new 1-Flowerhill establishment in Sentosa, Camille is a French-Japanese restaurant that oozes romance – it’s named after Monet’s lover and muse after all. Needless to say, it makes for an ideal date spot for a quiet evening away from prying eyes. The A5 Hokkaido beef and tuna akami tartar ($42) comes delicately plated with a tray of condiments such as grated wasabi and crispy puffed rice. And the restaurant puts a spin on the usual pan-fried foie gras ($32) by incorporating zesty passion fruit gel, simmered turnip, as well as genmaicha and kombu to the dish. For mains, opt for the white miso-glazed black cod ($48) which comes with tender asparagus and salted cod croquette; or the full blood wagyu flat iron ($62) that promises bold, deep flavours, complemented by a pleasant balsamic teriyaki and sweet confit banana shallot. 

Hot new restaurants and cafés to dine at this May

  • Korean
  • Tanjong Pagar

South Korea’s largest craft beer and fried chicken chain – with over 370 outlets in Korea – sets foot in the Telok Ayer neighbourhood this year. The chain has garnered a steady following among craft beer lovers, and among their fans are Korean celebrities like the cast of Running Man and actor Kim Da Mi. Expect to see a range of seven craft beers exclusively produced in partnership with small-batch Korean breweries. These are all served from the tap and in the brand’s iconic beer glasses. There are also Singapore-exclusive beers like the Telok Hazy IPA ($15), Telok Pale Ale ($14), and the K-Ginseng Lager ($13). The restaurant will serve crowd-favourite dishes like its popular Angry Bird fried chicken (from $27.90) which comes in four flavours – spicy; sweet garlic with aged soy sauce; kimchi; as well as sweet and spicy corn flakes with garlic seasoning.

  • Peranakan
  • Rochor

While there’s no shortage of Peranakan restaurants on our island, we’re always more than ready to welcome one more to the table. Nana Dolly’s menu is a spread of the owner’s family recipes, ranging from unmissable classics like Nonya chicken curry ($17) and sambal brinjal ($7), to innovative plates of laksa pasta ($10) and even an otak croffle ($15) topped with a sunny side up egg and sambal mayo. No meal here would be complete without ordering the signature mengkabao – succulent pork belly braised in a sweet and spicy tamarind sauce. You can choose between the sharing plate ($16), or opt for the individually portioned mengkabo don ($15.90) that comes with rice, achar, sambal egg and fish keropok. To complete the experience, wash it all down with an ice cold glass of ondeh ondeh latte ($7) infused with gula melaka.

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  • Contemporary European
  • Tanjong Pagar

Nook is a multi-storey restaurant and bar that just launched at Craid Road – but it could very well double up as a contemporary art gallery. The otherworldly space is gritty and industrial, mixed in with thrifted vintage furniture and artworks done by the brand’s in-house artist. On the first floor, try plates of modern European and Asian-inspired dishes, like the heirloom tomatoes and burrata ($24), which sees an interesting use of aromatic tarragon sorbet and quinoa puffs for added texture. The Aqina organic chicken ($42) with Koshihikari rice ($18) is the chef’s reinterpretation of chicken rice. The chicken is dry-aged for seven days for a greater depth of flavour, and the rice is topped with torched pieces of chicken cockscomb. The second floor of the establishment houses the cocktail bar Nowhere, which shakes up fresh tipples like Garden ($23) with Hendricks, apricot, elderflower, green apple, cucumber, mint and lime; and Chichi ($23) which mixes vodka with watermelon, coconut, pineapple and lime.

  • French
  • Chinatown

Alongside the launch of the Mercure Icon Singapore City Centre hotel, is the debut of La Table d’Emma, a sprawling 130-seater French restaurant within the establishment. And while French restaurants are a dime a dozen in Singapore, this one specialises in Alsatian cuisine from the Alsace region in northeastern France. Signatures include the tarte flambée or flammekueche – a traditional Alsatian flatbread covered with crème fraîche (from $20). The dish comes in four variations for sharing, with toppings like caramelised onions, sautéed mushrooms, fatty bacon, emmental cheese, and smoked salmon. Another must-try is the Bouchée à la Reine ($34) where delicate butterfly-shaped puff pastries are paired with veal, chicken and a creamy mushroom velouté.

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  • Chinese
  • Geylang

The people behind Boeuf – the beef steakhouse serving dry-aged meats – now bring us Ducking Good at Geylang, their latest venture focusing exclusively on duck. Here, you’ll find duck dishes of all types whipped up with a variety of cooking techniques to show the versatility of the protein. Try traditional Asian duck dishes like herbal roast duck ($69), the restaurant’s signature braised duck ($69) or the signature salted duck ($69). Spoilt for choice? Get the triple ducking platter ($49) which features tasting portions of all the three. Other duck variations include claypot duck, braised duck, double-boiled duck soup, duck fat garlic rice, and deep-fried duck confit style.

  • Contemporary Asian
  • Tanjong Pagar

Another exciting concept awaits at Craig Road. Nou Noodle Bar is a reimagination of diverse Asian flavours and cooking methods – fermentation, marinades, umami and spices – in the form of noodle dishes. Slurp up soulful bowls of noodles like the signature Nou Umami Noodles ($18) which are tossed in olive scallion sauce and topped with pickled jalapeno, tea marinated egg and doused with a koji fermented hot sauce. Give the cocktails a try as well – the head bartender is Bernadine Chan who used to be at Underdog Inn and Neon Pigeon. Try creative mixes like the Tomato Tomato ($24) – a savoury cocktail incorporating repurposed tomato brine from the kitchen into a unique twist on the dirty martini.

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  • Mediterranean
  • Outram

The folks behind the popular Siri House are back with Moxie, a modern Mediterranean restaurant inspired by the Mediterranean coast. The restaurant’s located at an unsuspecting location near the Singapore General Hospital, but is reminiscent of a beautiful, secluded beach house. In the spirit of communal dining, multiple sharing options are available, down to the mezzes. You’ll find a Moxie Dip Platter on every table (from $18). Served with pita or sourdough, graze on an assortment of dips like the black garlic hummus, brown butter roasted kabocha squash, whipped ricotta with sundried tomatoes and more. And for the mains, order a portion of the Umami Rice ($28), featuring a rich shellfish bisque swimming with clams, mussels, octopus and grilled tiger prawns. 

Hot new restaurants and cafés to dine at this April

  • Grills
  • Tiong Bahru

The Tiong Bahru neighbourhood welcomes its newest tenant to the iconic Moh Guan Terrace enclave – Dirty Supper. Run by chef-owner Peter Smit who was previously at Sago House, Adrift and Underdog Inn, the new joint marries Smit’s mastery of whole animal cooking and his love for the grill. Expect a modest and ever-evolving menu ranging from small to large plates, depending on the produce available that day.

Must-order snacks include the pig head nuggets ($16) with white anchovy, and the smoked mackerel ($18) which sits atop layers of addictive fried chicken terrine. As for large plates, go for the olive-brined lamb rump ($44) with caramelised cauliflower or the barbecue squid ($36) served with pork fat relish and pickled tomato. And if you’re spoilt for choice, the Dirty Feast menu ($88) is a fuss-free option that takes you through the kitchen’s best in one dinner sitting. The joint also runs a wallet-friendly drink menu, with tipples like the Wagyu Boulevardier ($18) that features wagyu fat-washed rye, and a delightful Apple Highball ($18) with scotch whisky, apple and lemon juice.

  • Korean
  • Chinatown

Gu:um brings Korean flavours to the table in Chef Louis Han’s newest contemporary grill concept. The joint is the casual offshoot of one-Michelin-starred Naeum, which is known for its contemporary Seoul cuisine. Take your pick between grilled beef, pork, lobsters and more, before choosing a homemade marinade to go with it. There’s even a fermented fish sauce marinade, which is reminiscent of the fish sauce that accompanies Jeju black pork barbecue. 

Veggies aren’t let off the hook here too – get your fibre in with flame-kissed grilled parsnips, vegetable skewers, and a corn cream and brioche dish. And if you’re up for something different, order the yukhwae jeon –  a Korean pancake topped with beef tartare – or the subsanjeok, a twist on the traditional Korean meat patty served with a side of sauerkraut.

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  • Pizza
  • Chinatown

This pizza joint has been around since 1870 and is one of the most popular pizzerias in Naples. It’s been touted by Gordon Ramsay as a must-visit for any pizza lover, and was even featured in the 2010 movie Eat Pray Love starring Julia Roberts. It will open its first Southeast Asian outpost at 8 Club Street, bringing along time-honoured Italian recipes and the signature pizza a ruota di carro or wagon wheel pizza to Singapore. This type of pizza is known to have a base dough that stretches over the plate underneath it. While the original store in Naples only offers two menu items – the pizza marinara and margherita, we can expect more classic Italian dishes and specialties on top of pizzas at the Singapore store.

  • Ramen
  • City Hall

Another popular ramen brand is set to open in town and it’s none other than the Tokyo-based ramen chain Mashi No Mashi, known to serve “the world’s first 100% wagyu ramen”. It’ll be the first and only restaurant in Singapore to serve wagyu tsukemen, a dry noodle dish with a dipping sauce. The chain also exclusively uses Ozaki wagyu – a type of premium black cattle raised in a small farm in Miyazaki prefecture.

Slurp up bowls of wagyujiro ramen, made with a 24-hour stewed Ozaki beef bone stock and eight-year barrel-aged soy sauce that adds a greater depth of flavour to the broth. Other items to look out for include the ever-popular wagyu gyozas with four different cuts of Ozaki beef, and the Wagyu Tsukemen Death which is a spicier version of the tsukemen. The chain will also debut a Singapore-exclusive item – a peppery bak kut teh ramen – inspired by the chef-founder’s love for the dish.

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  • Pizza
  • Rochor

Beyond the Dough made waves when it recently opened in Arab Street, and the new 28-seater hole-in-the-wall is already seeing bookings months ahead despite having just launched. Tokyo-Neapolitan slices are the main draw here, with each pizza handcrafted with precision by master pizzaiolo Eddie Murakami. Murakami trained at Pizza Strada and Pizza Studio Tamaki in Tokyo – ranked 82 and 88 respectively on the Top Pizzas in the World list for 2023. 

The restaurant exclusively uses flour, salt, and water filters that are imported from Japan, olive oil from Italy, and adheres to a strict 30-hour proofing time, resulting in a perfectly fluffy and chewy pizza crust. You can’t go wrong with classics like the margherita ($30), but we highly recommend ordering the Singapore Rampage ($39) and the 5 Formaggi ($39). The former boasts a spicy sauce base made with over 100 prawns cooked for a day, while the latter is a decadent mix of five cheeses topped with honey – an absolute dream for cheese lovers.

  • Izakaya
  • Tanjong Pagar

Chef Desmond Fong from the popular omakase restaurant Sushi Yujo now presents a casual sushi-izakaya concept with aburi and charcoal grill specialties from $6.80. On the menu are a range of appetisers, sushi, maki, and skewers. Chef signatures include the salmon carpaccio ($16.80) featuring a homemade truffle sauce and truffle caviar, and the Shinrai Royal Maki ($23.80) – the restaurant’s signature torched salmon and tiger-prawn roll, brushed with a special miso sauce. And no izakaya joint would be complete without must-have items like tsukune ($6.80), chicken wing ($3.80) or scallop ($7.80) skewers. The restaurant also offers lunch sets starting from $16.80, with 10 different mains to choose from, including crowd-pleasers like the bara chirashi don and salmon mentaiko don.

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  • Thai
  • Raffles Place

Thai food remains popular as ever in our food scene, and Fi puts a modern, wood-fired spin to the age-old cuisine. A double-ventilated charcoal oven with bicho-tan coal and lychee wood is the pride of the kitchen, and most dishes are prepared and coaxed over flames. Nestled in the quiet residential enclave of Robertson Walk, the restaurant dishes out elevated versions of street food like moo ping ($42). Bone-in ribs are marinated in a special blend of spices, slow-cooked and finished off in the charcoal oven to achieve a satisfying char and smokiness. The grilled French poulet ($28) is similarly marinated and grilled, before serving with chicken liver jaew for an extra layer of savouriness.

  • Bakeries
  • Bukit Timah

Fans of the popular Kamome Bakery which sells out daily at its Paragon outlet now can get fresh, quality bakes at its newly opened Bukit Timah store. Founded in 2019 by Chinami Date, a Japanese baker, the bakery incorporates air-flown ingredients from Japan in all its bakes and cakes. The new Bukit Timah outlet is also furnished with a large seating area for diners to grab a quick breakfast or mid-afternoon bite. Shelves are lined with classics like the toasted red bean and butter buns ($3.20), milk cream buns ($3.40) filled with fresh cream, hot dog buns ($5.50), and the signature Kamome Toast ($3.80). The bakery also makes fruit sandwiches ($5.40) which comes with generous portions of fresh fruit like strawberries or mangoes, and heaps of fresh cream.

Hot new restaurants and cafés to dine at this March

  • Fusion
  • Tanglin

Air is Dempsey Hill’s newest tenant, occupying a massive 40,000 square feet of space. The compound is home to a two-storey restaurant, an expansive lawn area, a research and development space, and even its own working garden with fresh produce. The brainchild of renowned chefs Matthew Orlando and Will Goldfarb from Noma and Room4Desserts respectively, the restaurant plates up contemporary Southeast Asian and European dishes with freshly farmed ingredients from its edible garden. 

With food, Orlando insists that deliciousness and accessibility is key, and sustainability comes closely after. Which is why you can get a five-course Chef’s Choice meal with desserts at a relatively reasonable price of $88 per person. The fermented cassava flatbread is a great starter, and comes with a generous serving of savoury whipped mushroom XO butter for you to lather onto the slices. Be expectant for the crispy oyster mushrooms too – the batter is light and airy, giving way to firm, fleshy mushrooms beneath. As Air opens up in phases, there are plans for the lawn to become a picnic space, where diners can grab picnic baskets from the restaurant and order food items from the lawn menu.

  • West African
  • Tanjong Pagar

African restaurants in Singapore are unfortunately still few and far between, so the opening of Tamba – the new West African joint in Duxton Hill – is much deserving of celebration. The owner Kurt Wagner is also the man behind the popular Kafe Utu, Singapore’s first African café-restaurant. You can expect the same air of homecoming and warmth at Tamba, with interiors decked out in rustic decor and thoughtful details. But unlike Kafe Utu’s menu which takes inspiration from across the entire continent, Tamba shines the spotlight on West African food. Take your pick between Jollof rice with sofrito, sakura chicken and smoked pork belly; the Tapalapa bread with goat’s milk ricotta, smoked honey and bacon butter; or Suya – a grilled Angus tenderloin skewer with kachumbari and smoked kuli kuli. 

The drinks menu is equally exciting, comprising 60 percent African spirits. Award-winning bartender Joma Rivera takes the stage here, shaking up imaginative cocktails like the savoury tomato-based Dry Boney, and the clarified milk cocktail Vita which features cacao butter and fat-washed Mhoba rum from South Africa.

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  • German
  • Tanjong Pagar

Kick back at this grungy joint straight out of Berlin. We’re talking graffiti-ed walls, metro motifs, and solid grub to boot. The co-founders wanted to replicate the chill, understated vibe that Berlin embodies, as well as its history of immigration – so don’t be surprised to see a fusion of Berlin staples with Asian and Middle-Eastern touches. The currywurst ($18) is simply a must-try – it’s a pork sausage served with curry ketchup, kewpie mayo and fries. You can also take your pick between seven döner kebabs, with the 1972 Berlin Original ($18) featuring rotisserie chicken being the most classic of them all. And of course, no German meal would be complete with a pint or two. Berlin65 imports craft beer from BRLO, brewed right in the heart of Kreuzberg.

  • Cafés
  • Bukit Timah

We’ve been seeing lots of new openings in Holland Village recently, but Frankie & Fern’s is located at a quieter side of the area. The new hidden rooftop café-terrace is at Holland Road Shopping Centre, and to get there, you’ll have to take the lift beside UOB up to the fourth floor. Once you arrive, you’ll be greeted with beautiful Scandinavian-inspired interiors, and a homey, inviting space flooded with natural light. 

The menu offers typical brunch fare like avo toast, granola and acai bowls, a big breakfast and the likes – alongside coffee. But there are also more unique offerings like the roasted short rib toast ($22) with provolone, chimichurri, and chilli-pickled cucumbers; and housemade green tea mint kombucha ($9). A kids’ play area out on the terrace is also in the works, making it an ideal spot to while away a weekend afternoon, since the young ones would be kept sufficiently entertained for some time.

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  • French
  • Marina Bay

Adding to Marina Bay Sands’ restaurant hall of fame is Maison Boulud – the restaurant’s second outlet after its Montreal flagship. Internationally acclaimed chef-restaurateur Daniel Boulud is most known for his two-Michelin-star namesake restaurant Daniel in New York, but at Maison Boulud, he aims to bring soulful French food to the table. Executive Chef Rémy Carmignani executes Boulud’s vision in creations like the lobster pastilla ($78) – succulent lobster encrusted in a crisp pastilla pillow and served with confit fennel, as well as the seafood salad ($26) with seasonal ingredients tossed in an anchovy garlic dressing. 

The restaurant takes over Db Bistro & Oyster Bar – Boulud’s previous MBS concept which closed to give way to Maison Boulud – but some of Db’s offerings will remain. These include the signature seafood platter (from $135) with oysters, Maine lobsters, crabs, and more. The crowd-favourite Original Db Burger will also be available on the alfresco menu.

  • Middle Eastern
  • Tanjong Pagar

Fat Prince is gone, and in its place, The Dandy Collection debuts The Prince. Arabian cuisine with a contemporary twist is the focus here, inspired by the concept of ‘karam’ or the spirit of generosity in Arab culture. Fittingly, the Karam menu ($75 per person) presents a communal dining experience, including a sharing mezze platter, soup, mains, and dessert. 

A dazzling array of nine dishes is served as part of the mezze platter – think cashew hummus and pumpkin walnut baba ganoush among other decadent spreads and sides. And before the mains are rolled out, the Lobster Shorbat Addas is served – a fragrant lobster soup with spices and lentils. Then, feast on the lamb loin skewer, which is flambéed by the table, or the whole Mediterranean Seabass for two, which is deboned, tangerine and sumac-crusted and served with a zingy zaatar yoghurt. The karak tea served with fig earl grey ice cream should round things off nicely. 

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  • Fusion
  • Raffles Place

Michelin-starred chef Andrew Walsh behind the illustrious Cure is now the Culinary Director at Kee’s – the newest addition to the luxury heritage hotel 21 Carpenter. The building dates back to 1936 where it was once a remittance house for migrants. At Kee’s, modern European fare meets Pan-Asian influences, paying homage to the history of the site. Start with fresh and clean flavours in the tuna tartare with a Vietnamese coconut dressing, before diving into heavier mains the Japanese red seabream that’s doused with a fragrant green curry emulsion and served alongside coconut rice. 

The drinks programme is equally impressive. Carefully designed craft cocktails tell the history of the area, featuring spices and fruits that were once sold by peddlers along Carpenter street in the 1930s. Standouts include the Spice & Sips, which is a blend of Los Arcos agave spirit and passionfruit; as well as the Calamansi Melange, which uses Canerock spiced rum, calamansi and candied winter melon to achieve a sweet but zesty flavour.

  • Indian
  • Raffles Place

Ammakase fuses the concept of omakase with the tradition of mothers (amma in Tamil) passing down their most prized recipes to the next generation. Indian dishes are the highlight here, but the techniques used to prepare them are borderless, taking inspiration from Japan, France, Italy, Korean and other Asian cuisines. There’s no menu, so expect things to be switched up by the day according to Executive Chef Abhijit Saha’s recommendations and the seasonal produce that the restaurant receives from local farms. Opt for a four course lunch menu ($79), a six course all-day menu ($139), or go all out with the eight course ($189) menu for a more comprehensive experience. We hear that they shake up an excellent masala gin cocktail as well.

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  • Thai
  • Chinatown

Singaporeans can’t get enough of Bangkok, and the folks behind Fourgather know it. The restaurant is Amoy Hotel’s newest tenant, boasting a vibey, eclectic space and modern Thai street food. During the day, it offers reasonably priced lunch sets like the Khao Khai Jiao or omelette with rice ($9.90), and the classic basil pork or chicken rice with scrambled egg ($12.90). But if you’ve more time to spare, we recommend heading down with friends so you can share the Fried Fish Miang ($44.90) – featuring deep fried fish chunks with an assortment of herbs and vegetables. Other interesting options include the lesser seen Thai watermelon salad ($16.90) or the tangy but addictive Gaeng Som ($20.90) – Thai assam tamarind soup. The Fourgather Matchstick Wings ($11.90) also makes for a great snack while knocking back some beers.

  • Indian
  • City Hall

Another Indian restaurant joins the roundup this month, and this one’s Bombay Brasserie – an iconic restaurant chain from India with outlets in London, Cape Town and Dubai. Bombay and Indian cuisine is served with the backdrop of an elegant Parisian-inspired brasserie, hence the name. Signature dishes include the Chatka Crab Legs ($60) served with a coriander chilli butter glaze, and the ever-popular butter chicken ($40). But turn your eyes to the chaat section of the menu – it presents refreshing takes on chaat, which are savoury snacks from roadside stalls or food carts in India. Try the avocado and salmon papdi chaat ($29) out for size. The Tandoor section is also unskippable and features an array of crabs, prawns, salmon and chicken that are fired up in the restaurant’s clay oven, all accompanied either with mint chutney or other pairing sauces.

Hot new restaurants and cafés to dine at this February

  • French
  • Tanglin

Roia at the E.J.H Corner House of Singapore Botanic Gardens marks Chef Priyam Chatterjee’s first foray into Singapore. French and botanical influences are strong here, explained by Chef Priyam’s background in French fine dining and the restaurant’s iconic locale. The six ($188) and eight ($288) course menus include artistic creations like Corner’s Flowers, which sees the rare appearance of Japanese Ginpo fish, along with smoked almond, beetroot extraction and yuzu calamansi. Meanwhile, the dish Fungi and Corner shifts the spotlight to seasonal mushrooms, which sit atop a bed of potato rosti and a warm mushroom velouté. Vibrant, fresh, and tinged with a playful elegance characteristic of Chef Priyam, a meal at Roia will leave you with a newfound appreciation for the beauty of the gardens. 

  • Korean
  • Orchard

The opening of Cote Korean Steakhouse in COMO Orchard generated much buzz around town when it was first announced – no surprise as the restaurant is the first and only Korean steakhouse with a Michelin star. The Singapore outlet is also the first international outpost of the American-based joint. Conceived in New York, Cote elevates the traditional Korean barbeque experience with elements from classic American steakhouses, using the highest grade of USDA Prime and American wagyu beef to pair with refreshing banchan. But it doesn’t just stop at the food – Cote is clearly out to set diners up for a night of revelry. The restaurant boasts a jungle-themed bar at the entrance, a music room with a stage for performances, and even a cigar lounge which projects noir films.  

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  • Tapas bars
  • Kallang

Word on the street is that a new Hong Kong bar concept just launched in the heart of Jalan Besar. As you step into Cha Chaan Teng, the moody and enigmatic interiors will transport you right into the set of a Wong Kar Wai film. The main draw is Hong Kong cuisine done with a twist and in the style of tapas. Expect to see wu tau you ($8.90), a savoury yam cake dish presented as fries and dusted with chilli powder, and har cheong tin gai ($13.90) made with frog legs instead of chicken. Drinks here are named after famous characters and movies from Hong Kong’s golden age of cinema. Take Mo Wan ($25) for example. Named after Tony Leung’s character from ‘In the Mood for Love’, the cocktail is served warm, infused with herbaceous notes and topped with tea egg air foam. 

  • Contemporary Asian
  • Raffles Place

Old-timers will know the 1920s heritage warehouse on Jiak Kim Street as the former home of Zouk. The building has since been transformed into an elegant fine dining establishment – Jiak Kim House, which presents Modern Asian and Southeast Asian flavours with a tinge of history, as a nod to its storied past. The Tingkat of Memories ($36) is ideal for sharing and features light bites like herbed crab cake, lamb goulash croquette, otak otak made with Spanish mackerel and a chilli crab pie tee. And to go with it, sip on Sips Of The Silk Road ($26), a mezcal and whisky infusion paired with spiced bitters, ginger liqueur and kaffir lime. For previous Zouk regulars, we can imagine how a visit to Jiak Kim House might be as disorienting as it is fascinating – an unforgettable experience either way.

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  • Japanese
  • Queenstown

Adding to Singapore’s already strong arsenal of Japanese restaurants, Ginkyo by Kinki – by the same folks behind Kinki at the Customs House – is the newest to hit the scene at One Holland Village. Inspired by the Japanese Ginkgo Festival where crowds gather to admire stunning autumn foliage, Ginkyo exudes a similar beauty both in its ambience and food. Small plates and yakitori sticks are available, but exclusive to the restaurant are the Ginkyo Crispies (from $14), which see delicate rice crispies topped with luxurious ingredients from uni and caviar, to tuna belly, foie gras and scallops. Lunch sets are also available, such as the Ginkyo sashimi set ($40) which includes a chef’s selection of 10 pieces of seasonal fish fresh from Tokyo’s Toyosu Market.

  • Barbecue
  • Queenstown

An offshoot concept of the popular steakhouse Bedrock Bar & Grill launches at One Holland Village, and this one’s called Fireplace. The restaurant prides itself on its use of an open wood fire grill that allows the original flavours of its produce to shine. Feast on the 8 hours wood-fired roasted whole lamb ($42) or the 6 hours wood-fired crispy pork (from $35), which come with a medley of sauces like smoked apple ketchup, chimichurri, green chilli relish and pommery mustard. Another unique offering: the bone marrow toast ($28), which sees a rich and fatty bone marrow spread paired with caramelised onions, parsley, capers and pickled shallots for a splash of acidity. Vegetarian options are also aplenty at this meathouse: the smoky coal-roasted sweet potatoes ($12) and spicy brussels sprouts ($14) are some good choices for sharing.

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  • Cafés
  • Marina Bay

A Wall Street style bistro opens in Singapore’s very own ‘Wall Street’. Market Bistro at Marina Bay Financial Centre is the CBD’s new gem, launched by the same team behind successful concepts like Meadesmoore, Fat Belly (FBG) and Elixir Coffee and Wine. Two distinct menus are available: the takeaway ASAP Lunch menu for time-strapped hustlers, or the all-day dine-in menu for those with more time to spare (currently only available after 4pm). The takeaway lunch menu covers all grounds with a wide selection of proteins for various diets. Fish options include the battered cod ($17) and Scandinavian salmon ($15), the grass-fed steak ($18) and 40 Garlic Roasted Chicken ($14) for meat lovers, and not forgetting the vegetarians, who can opt for the jackfruit shish kebab ($12) or the Big A** Falafel ($10).

  • Japanese
  • Tanjong Pagar

Some might scoff at the idea of a meatless omakase, but the opening of Ki Su is a big win for vegetarians and vegetable lovers alike who now have the opportunity to savour the art and experience of omakase without any restrictions. The restaurant is the latest concept by the people behind Joie by Dozo. Inspired by shojin ryori, which is a traditional style of cooking practised by Buddhist monks in Japan, Ki Su’s plant-based menus feature both refreshing and rich flavours as well as diverse textures to keep things interesting. Look out for the Air Flown Tonburi Caviar which is spotlighted in the appetiser – a vegan delicacy consumed in Japan’s Akita Prefecture which is reminiscent of fish caviar. The lunch ($88) and dinner ($168) sets come with eight and ten courses respectively, all with a strong focus on dishes that are healthy and nourishing.

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  • Japanese
  • Chinatown

Another wildly popular restaurant makes Singapore home for its first international outpost – Moss Cross Tokyo. Hailing from Japan, the restaurant specialises in shokado omakase, which see small, delicately plated dishes arranged around a picture-pleasing wooden box, each focusing on a particular seasonal ingredient. Highlights include the Hyogo oyster doused in camembert mousse, milk foam and served with caviar and kombu, as well as the indulgent Kyoto wagyu sushi paired with uni and truffle shoyu. The structured presentation of food encourages a more mindful and intentional eating experience where diners can savour the quality and freshness of each dish. Lunch omakase courses are available at $68 and $80 options, while dinner menus are priced at $128 or $150.

Hot new restaurants and cafés to dine at this January

  • Steakhouse
  • Orchard

Acclaimed Australian chef-restaurateur Josh Niland of Saint Peter restaurant and Fish Butchery in Sydney has brought a slice of his artistry to our sunny shores with the launch of Fysh, located at the Singapore Edition hotel. A pioneer of whole fish cookery, chef Niland is renowned for championing the scale-to-fin culinary philosophy, where he uses all parts of the fish in his cooking, ensuring there is minimal to zero wastage. His first overseas restaurant outside Australia, Fysh stays true to his sustainable steakhouse-inspired seafood concept, offering ethically sourced seafood and fish creations cooked over a charcoal Josper grill. 

Notable highlights to try include the popular cheeseburger, where a Mooloolaba yellowfin tuna replaces the traditional beef patty; the 15-day 400g dry-aged Mooloolaba yellowfin tuna ribeye; and the Fysh egg tart comprising trout roe, crème fraiche and chives. Save some space for desserts – the Valrhona chocolate macaron with yellowfin tuna eye ice cream promises a surprising end to your meal.

  • Chinatown

Joining the growing list of stellar fine-dining restaurants along Keong Saik is Hevel, helmed by chef-owner Stefan Liau. The renowned chef is no stranger to the scene – he most recently held the position of head chef at Mandala Club, which brought culinary powerhouses like Yoshihiro Narisawa, Gaggan Anand and Manish Mehrotra to Singapore. Prior to his stint at Mandala Club, Liau cut his teeth at a handful of Michelin-starred restaurants like Cure by Andrew Walsh, Terra in Tokyo, Japan, and Spoon by Alain Ducasse in Hong Kong.

Hevel marks his debut as a restaurateur and is inspired by his upbringing and experience leading some of the region’s most celebrated kitchens. The food, rooted in European techniques but drawing inspiration from around the world, is designed to offer a refined communal dining experience. Setting the tone for the meal is a trio of snacks: orange doughnuts crowned with caviar and smoked crème fraiche, maguro tuna choux topped with bonito and nasturtium, and a crispy chicken liver parfait perfumed with granny smith apples and sherry wine vinegar.

The small plates continue to excite, featuring artfully plated dishes that offer a delightful combination of flavours and textures. Highlights include the mackerel with passionfruit and the potato hash layered with pickled leek.  For mains, diners can pick from a selection of meats like the porcini-rubbed pork presa, grilled short rib, and duck with roasted barley.

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  • Indian
  • River Valley

Adventurous diners seeking new culinary experiences in the new year should definitely bookmark this spot along Mohamed Sultan Road. Helmed by head chef Saumya Prakash, who trained under acclaimed chef Dave Pynt at the Waldorf Astoria at Ithaafushi Maldives, The Curry Club Signature is a casual-fine dining restaurant serving Indian cuisine prepared with a modern and creative flair. Think dishes like smoked frog leg biryani served with beetroot raita; pork sandos done vindaloo style; and “puri bombs”, a twist on the classic Indian street food stuffed with avocado relish and garnished with pickled cucumber. Other notable offerings include the stuffed squid curry served with mango apple salad and blue pea rice, as well as the Josper-roasted lamb chop biryani.

  • Sri Lankan
  • Rochor

For a taste of authentic Sri Lankan cuisine, visit Kunthaville, a new Ceylonese restaurant and tea room situated in a charming two-story shophouse along Veerasamy Road. Incepted by chef-owner Kuntha Chelvanathan, the establishment serves up vegan Sri Lankan fare prepared with imported Sri Lankan ingredients like cinnamon, spice mixes and Sri Lankan rice. If you want to learn more about Sri Lankan cuisine, feel free to ask Kuntha or one of the waitstaff – they will be more than happy to explain while you dig into the deftly prepared dishes. Must order dishes include the spicy beetroot cutlets, the curry leaf coconut rice with jackfruit curry and mango chutney, and the gundappam or fat appam, comprising fermented rice treats served with roasted coconut chambal and a drizzle of coconut milk. End off a hearty meal with sweet treats like vegan brownies paired with freshly brewed tea made with tea leaves grown on her family’s tea plantations in Sri Lanka.

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  • Tanjong Pagar

Opened by homegrown F&B company Ebb & Flow, who is also behind award-winning restaurants like Sommer and Willow, Tribal is a modern Asian grill located within Mondrian Singapore Duxton. Led by executive chef Keith Wan, the 58-seater establishment shines the spotlight on wood-fired cooking and familiar Asian flavours. To start, order a few items from the small plates section of the menu to share, especially the yellowtail umai, featuring fresh sashimi tossed in a bright Sarawakian inspired dressing of lime, chilli, garlic and kaffir lime. Alternatively, the bincho scallops – gently seared then placed atop smoked buttermilk with homemade XO sauce, basil oil and pear – is sure to whet your appetite. 

To fill up, the meats are a must-try. The pure black dry-aged OP rib boasts a nutty aroma and intense flavours, while the satsuma striploin features exquisite melt-in-the-mouth marbling. While the meats are a high point, the star of the menu is easily the sharing rice pots, available in three variants: wild mushroom, Wagyu and seafood. All three options come with a nasi ulam base that mixes fluffy Thai Jasmine rice with fresh aromatic vegetables and herbs. Made to order and simmered in a cast iron pot, each pot will require 30 minutes cooking time, with portions that could satiate up to three pax just on its own.

Still hungry? Check out these hot spots

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