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Sydney welcomes back bohemian food and music festival Lost Picnic

Written by
Madeleine Thomas
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After a three year hiatus, boutique food and music festival Lost Picnic is returning to the Domain in October. The eclectic, family friendly festival features musicians from Australia and New Zealand and food from well-known Sydney restaurants in one huge picnic in the park. All brought to you by the people who run NYE fest Lost Paradise.

Headlining the music program is NZ reggae-soul-techno group Fat Freddy’s Drop, plus performances from ARIA award-winning artists Sarah Blasko and Montaigne, as well as Melbourne band the Teskey Brothers and Sydney’s country ladies, All Our Exes Live in Texas. Cover band the Beatle Boys will join the Australian Symphony Orchestra to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the classic Beatles’ album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club.

While you’re listening to the music, you can snack on dishes from Malaysian restaurant Mamak, Chur Burger, organic restaurant Agape, Middle Eastern pop-up food company the Tel Aviv Issue and Woolloomooloo Italian restaurant Puntino Trattoria, who will be providing picnic hampers that you can preorder for $50. For the sweet toothed, you’ll find KOI Dessert Bar’s food truck selling Asian inspired desserts by former Masterchef contestant Reynold Poernomo.

Crowds dancing to music in the park
Lost Picnic is a day out for the whole family
Photograph: Lost Picnic

Lost Picnic is a family friendly event, so there’ll be plenty of kids’ entertainment acts including the Gramophone Man, Wind up Ballerina and the Blue Tongue Brass Band. Kids will find roaming magicians, giant games of checkers and balloon sculptures throughout the day, too.

The last Lost Picnic, in 2014, took place in Centennial Park with sets from the Rubens, Megan Washington and Emma Louise, bringing together 3,000 people. This version in the Domain will take place on October 15, from noon-8pm.

Tickets are $89-$120 per person and you can start booking from July 21.

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