LGBTIQ

Your guide to queer life in Sydney, from friendly places to the best parties in town

Queer eye on Sydney

Meet the crew: Heaps Gay
Clubs

Meet the crew: Heaps Gay

Whether you're gay, straight or somewhere in between, you'll have a heaps good time at one of Sydney's favourite queer and inclusive parties.

The Bearded Tit
Bars

The Bearded Tit

If you want to see Sydney at her absolute best, go for a drink at Redfern’s neighbourhood art bar, the Bearded Tit.

Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Slyfox
Gay and lesbian

Slyfox

Come here for regular queer nights, fresh band gigs, and the legends from Bad Deep doing a bi-monthly party.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Sydney's nightlife, now
Blog

Sydney's nightlife, now

Sydney’s nightlife scene has shifted dramatically since the controversial lockout laws were first imposed in March of 2014. The changes have been felt in a myriad of ways for punters, promoters, partygoers, DJs and musicians and, most visibly, the venues. Since Time Out initially reported on reforms, the Flinders, Soho, Trademark, Q Bar, Hugos Lounge and the Backroom have all closed.   The lockout laws were introduced in March 2014 by the state government in an attempt to curb alcohol-fuelled violence, following a number of fatalities. The suite of reforms mainly have affected the ‘entertainment precinct’, which stretches across the CBD, Surry Hills, Darlinghurst, the Rocks, Kings Cross and Cockle Bay, and include 1.30am venue lockouts, the 3am cessation of alcohol service at bars, pubs and clubs and the state-wide take-away alcohol must not be sold after 10pm. As a result the laws have affected the way Sydneysiders go out… What were once bustling nightspots are now much quieter, there’s been as dispersing of revellers to the fringes of the city, and generally there is a lot less positivity towards late night culture in what could and should be a vibrant and functional, 24 hour city.   Tyson Koh is someone who’s entrenched in music and nightlife in Sydney. The producer and programmer of the ABC’s long-running Rage, Koh also DJs and has thrown a few parties in his time. He heads up the alliance Keep Sydney Open, which is fast gaining momentum.   “We’re aiming to get publ

You might also like...

Here's what it's like to try opera for the first time
Theatre

Here's what it's like to try opera for the first time

Opera is one of our most revered forms of culture. But with great reputation comes a high intimidation-factor. At Time Out, we’re lucky enough to have seen plenty of operas, so we know it’s not all valkyries in horned helmets and heavy breast armour. But we also know not everyone has been so lucky. Like Shakespeare, The Iliad and The Odyssey or Jane Austen, opera has worked itself so deeply into our pop-cultural imaginations that most of us can probably recognise Bizet’s ‘Habanera’ aria, or the twisty plotting of Cosi Fan Tutte without necessarily knowing where it came from. Given this sense of familiarity, we figured that for most people, seeing a famous opera for the first time will feel more like reconnecting with an old friend than meeting someone new. To test the theory, we gathered together four young creative types, with very different backgrounds, from three different cities, with one thing in common: they’d never been to the opera as an adult. We brought them all to Sydney for Opera Australia’s production of Puccini’s La Boheme and filmed the results.   Melburnian Ali Barter may make grungy guitar pop now, but the Girlie Bits singer is also a classically trained soprano. As a kid, she’d actually appeared on stage in an opera, but she’d never seen one performed before. “I imagine I’m going to be blown away by their technical ability,” she told us before the show. True to her word, she came out impressed. “Just their breathing ability… it was incredible. Now I kn

Sky Terrace
Bars

Sky Terrace

At the first sign of summer in Sydney we’re on the look out for a place to kick back with a couple of friends, cocktail in hand, and views of our beautiful harbour. The Star's Sky Terrace has one of the most impressive views in the city, from the Harbour Bridge to the skyscrapers, and it’s open every weekend until March.  From Friday nights to Sunday sessions, you’ll find DJs playing a soundtrack to your summer. This year, they have pop-up bars from Heineken, Grey Goose, Country Club Tequila and Tanquery Gin, so no matter what your tipple there’ll be a cocktail list to match your mood. There’s also giant jenga and foosball – perfect for a Sunday arvo catch-up.  Peckish? You can choose from a range of casual dining fare including: lobster rolls with crisps, philly cheese steak, brie and jalapeno quesadillas and more.

Ten dishes you have to eat on The Streets of Barangaroo
Restaurants

Ten dishes you have to eat on The Streets of Barangaroo

For years the waterfront north of Darling Harbour was home to, well, not much. You might exit right at the King Street ferry and plunge into the tourist morass therein. Exit left nowadays and you’ll find yourself in, arguably, Sydney’s best dining district. Midweek, The Streets of Barangaroo hum with the CBD’s lunching masses. At the weekend, Wynyard Station deposits foodies at the doorstep of this hub of outposts from Sydney’s top restaurants. Today, cult eats right on the water’s edge – from Spanish to Vietnamese cuisine, Louisiana-style barbecue to sushi, bakeries, gelaterias, cocktail bars and coffee shops – woo you in. The precinct’s plan to create a place where you can work, eat, shop, live and play all within a few hundred metres along Sydney’s glittering harbour edge has coalesced into buzzing reality. And you have to taste it.

Landmarks
Art

Landmarks

Blue Mountains City Art Gallery presents Landmarks, a major contemporary exhibition featuring works by some of the world's most prominent land and environmental artists. Landmarks features work by some of the most significant artists of the late 20th and early 21st century, including Christo & Jeanne-Claude, Simryn Gill, Andy Goldsworthy, Andreas Gursky, Richard Long, Perejaume, Imants Tillers, and internationally renowned Blue Mountains artists Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro, who contributed a brand new commission titled 'The Ugly Stick Orchestra'. Drawing upon the John Kaldor Family Collection at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Landmarks is an important exhibition developed in partnership with the Art Gallery of New South Wales for the fifth anniversary of the Blue Mountains Cultural Centre, an outstanding regional gallery and a visitor drawcard of increasing importance.