LGBTIQ

Your guide to queer life in Sydney, from friendly places to the best parties in town

Queer eye on Sydney

Meet the crew: Heaps Gay
Clubs

Meet the crew: Heaps Gay

Whether you're gay, straight or somewhere in between, you'll have a heaps good time at one of Sydney's favourite queer and inclusive parties.

The Bearded Tit
Bars

The Bearded Tit

If you want to see Sydney at her absolute best, go for a drink at Redfern’s neighbourhood art bar, the Bearded Tit.

Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Slyfox
Gay and lesbian

Slyfox

Come here for regular queer nights, fresh band gigs, and the legends from Bad Deep doing a bi-monthly party.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Sydney's nightlife, now
Blog

Sydney's nightlife, now

Sydney’s nightlife scene has shifted dramatically since the controversial lockout laws were first imposed in March of 2014. The changes have been felt in a myriad of ways for punters, promoters, partygoers, DJs and musicians and, most visibly, the venues. Since Time Out initially reported on reforms, the Flinders, Soho, Trademark, Q Bar, Hugos Lounge and the Backroom have all closed.   The lockout laws were introduced in March 2014 by the state government in an attempt to curb alcohol-fuelled violence, following a number of fatalities. The suite of reforms mainly have affected the ‘entertainment precinct’, which stretches across the CBD, Surry Hills, Darlinghurst, the Rocks, Kings Cross and Cockle Bay, and include 1.30am venue lockouts, the 3am cessation of alcohol service at bars, pubs and clubs and the state-wide take-away alcohol must not be sold after 10pm. As a result the laws have affected the way Sydneysiders go out… What were once bustling nightspots are now much quieter, there’s been as dispersing of revellers to the fringes of the city, and generally there is a lot less positivity towards late night culture in what could and should be a vibrant and functional, 24 hour city.   Tyson Koh is someone who’s entrenched in music and nightlife in Sydney. The producer and programmer of the ABC’s long-running Rage, Koh also DJs and has thrown a few parties in his time. He heads up the alliance Keep Sydney Open, which is fast gaining momentum.   “We’re aiming to get publ

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Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue

Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue

Maybe you saw him on HBO's Treme, or one of his appearances on Conan, Leno, Kimmel or Fallon. Now, hot off the back of touring with the Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Trombone Shorty is coming down under to play Bluesfest and some special sideshows. Joined by his swinging band Orleans Avenue, Trombone Shorty brings brass and big band sounds to life on the stage with serious flair. The jazz and soul maestro isn't a stranger to big stages – he's played at the White House, alongside Madonna and helped out pop producer Mark Ronson on his albums – so you can expect some big vibes from him when he plays the Metro Theatre.

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Barangaroo Ngangamay
Things to do

Barangaroo Ngangamay

Barangaroo Ngangamay is an innovative, interactive artwork that gives you the chance to go on an journey of learning and discovery throughout Barangaroo Reserve. Using an app to place you within the context and history of the site, Barangaroo Ngangamay uses geo-locating to reveal intricate stories, songs and rock engravings scattered throughout the Barangaroo Reserve. The Barangaroo Ngangamay app includes five short films, which are unlocked by visiting sandstone artworks handcarved by Aboriginal elders Vic Simms, Steven Russell and Laurie Bimson. Each film shows the resilience and diversity of Barangaroo and the Aboriginal women who used to call the Reserve home. Created by renowned Indigenous multi-media artists Amanda Jane Reynolds and Genevieve Grieves, the work is the result of a collaboration between the pair and local Aboriginal communities and elders, developed to tell ancient and treasured stories of the world’s oldest living culture. The Barangaroo Ngangamay app is available to download for iOS and Android devices.

Help the homeless by eating kingfish poké
Restaurants

Help the homeless by eating kingfish poké

Hawaiian poké is a dish currently sweeping the world and Salmon & Bear seafood eateries in Zetland and Newtown are among the best places in town to eat it.   Poké – basically a delicious raw fish salad – has been a highlight of Salmon & Bear since they opened, with tuna, salmon and sweet prawn varieties designed by chef Mark Jensen (who taught at the Sydney Seafood School for 15 years). Now Salmon & Bear have created a new kingfish poké: diced Hiramasa kingfish in a miso and sesame dressing served on a salad of kale, quinoa, fennel, tomato, sweet potato, carrot, Spanish onion and pepita seeds. To launch this new dish, Salmon & Bear wanted to support the Newtown Neighbourhood Centre’s First Response Program. The program ensures that anybody who is homeless leaves the centre with a pathway towards getting a roof over their heads. The kingfish poké costs $21, and $2 from every one sold will be donated to the First Response Program, until they’ve raised enough money to get 20 people off the streets. You get a tasty meal, plus the warm feeling of having helped someone in need. Nicely played, Salmon & Bear.  

Sculpture at Scenic World
Kids

Sculpture at Scenic World

When art escapes the galleries and gets out into the landscape, magical things can happen. There’s nothing quite like trekking through a Jurassic-era rainforest, rounding a corner and suddenly spying a cloud of red snowballs, a mosaic of mirrors, a convoy of toy trucks, or a squadron of ninja koalas. That’s the appeal of Sculpture at Scenic World – the element of surprise, delight, to have our senses confounded, our minds provoked – and the reason why the event is enjoying a sixth season in 2017. The exhibition, which kicks off on April 7 and goes for just one month, brings another dimension to Scenic World in Katoomba, and makes a visit especially appealing for parents who want to expose their kids to art as well as the great outdoors.   Take the trip down the steepest railway in the world (the Scenic Railway), then make your way along Australia’s longest elevated boardwalk (the Scenic Walkway) to discover the exhibition. Thirty-five local, interstate and international artists have created works specifically to be installed in the rainforest along the Scenic Walkway. As part of this year’s Sculpture at Scenic World, there is a program of workshops for children called Sculpture for Small People that encourages kids to engage with the artists and their works. These are fun, educational workshops on Saturday and Sunday mornings that cost $15, including all materials, in which children can create their own artworks to take home – from ceramics and Easter Eggs to spider web