Manhattan restaurant guide: Where to eat in Manhattan

Discover the best places to eat with our critic-approved selection of Manhattan restaurants, including trusty favorites and the latest hot spots.

The breadth of the Manhattan restaurant scene is truly something to behold, ranging from internationally renowned fine-dining establishments to tasty cheap eats, and boasting a cosmopolitan range of cuisines to choose from, including Thai, Spanish, Italian, Middle Eastern and Indian. Find a Manhattan restaurant with our roundup of the most popular places to eat; you can also browse by neighborhod or find an affordable option.

RECOMMENDED: Complete guide to Manhattan

Best Manhattan restaurants by neighborhood

Chelsea

The Chelsea restaurant scene is constantly shifting—our critic-approved selection includes trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. The arrival of The NoMad, a block away from cult hits The Breslin Bar & Dining Room and The John Dory Oyster Bar, has boosted the Chelsea restaurant scene and cemented the neighborhood’s northeast corner as a hot dining destination. You’ll also find top-notch barbecue and tapas spots, plus plenty of cheap eats and great brunch places.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Chelsea, New York Boqueria Given that Boqueria is named for Barcelona’s centuries-old food market, you might expect the menu to lean toward the classics. Not quite. Chef Seamus Mullen’s bacalao (salt cod), a standard tapas ingredient, is served here as an airy and crisp beignet. The most successful sangria is an unorthodox beer-based version that mixes lager, pear puree, lemon juice and triple sec. The Flatiron location is small and the bar area packed; a better bet is the 16-seat communal table, where you can nibble shaved jamón under the glow of filament bulbs. Meanwhile, the Soho branch is a less manic scene, more than twice as big and nearly twice as inviting. There, diners can see into the open kitchen, where exceptional classics like fluffy salt-cod croquetas, and dates oozing cabrales cheese are realized. Caveat emptor: While the big flavors that made the first spot a sensation have successfully transitioned farther downtown, so too have the minuscule portions. The Breslin Bar & Di

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Chinatown

Our Chinatown restaurant guide points you to critic-approved places to eat in the neighborhood, including trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. Between Kenmare and Worth Streets, Mott Street is lined with restaurants representing the cuisine of virtually every province of mainland China and Hong Kong; the Bowery, East Broadway and Division Street are just as diverse. The choice is overwhelming, but our Chinatown restaurant guide will help you narrow it down, whether you crave fiery Szechuan cuisine or Peking Duck; also check out our picks for cheap eats and brunch.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Chinatown, New York Grand Sichuan Grand Sichuan’s comprehensive menu comes with an annotated booklet describing the history and cooking process for each of the 100-plus dishes. Szechuan cuisine is based on heat, so prepare for a meal that is not only mouthwatering but eye-watering as well. The dandan rice-noodle starter, loaded with dried peppercorns, will open your sinuses. Waiters routinely caution those who order the memorable braised beef in chili sauce—it’s an inferno on a plate. Panfried au zhao chicken offers equally addictive flavor with less heat. Experiment, because gems abound on the menu, and you have nothing to lose but your fear of fire. Peking Duck House Your waiter parades the roasted duck past your party beforeplacing it on the center show table. A chef brandishes his knives dramatically, then slices the aromatic, crisp-skinned, succulent meat with great flair. Folks

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East Village

Our East Village restaurant guide points you to critic-approved places to eat in the neighborhood, including trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. The East Village has a knack for sprouting reasonably priced eateries that draw cult followings. No East Village restaurant guide would be complete without mention of David Chang’s enduringly popular Momofuku Noodle Bar, which spawned his mini empire, and other top toques—including Peter Hoffman with Back Forty and Daniel Boulud with DBGB Kitchen and Bar—have set up shop in the nabe. Northern Spy Food Co. has become a locavore staple for its earnest (and delicious) devotion to seasonal cooking. Also consult our curated lists of cheap eats and great brunch places.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to East Village Back Forty Chef-restaurateur Peter Hoffman (Savoy) is behind this seasonal-eats tavern, where farmhouse chic prevails in the dining room (vintage tools adorn the walls) and on the menu. Gastropub fare—like the pleasantly gamey grass-fed hamburger or pork jowl nuggets, frozen in a crisp jacket of batter—is uniformly solid. Veggies shine too: Baby cauliflower gratin is layered with leeks and Gruyère, and the exemplary brussels sprouts are slicked with cherry butter and served with shallot puree. Desserts uphold the pub end of things: Conclude with a creamy stout float. DBGB Kitchen and Bar Chef Daniel Boulud doesn’t do decent, so-so or almost great. Even as he branches out around the world—with outlets in Palm Beach, Beijing a

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Gramercy and Flatiron

Our Gramercy and Flatiron restaurant guide points you to critic-approved places to eat in the area, including trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. Over the past several years, this area has emerged as a dining hot spot. Our Gramercy and Flatiron restaurant guide includes critically acclaimed chefs’ flagships such as Eleven Madison Park and down-to-earth eateries like carnivore paradise The Cannibal. In 2010, Mario Batali—along with Joe and Lidia Bastianich—chose the Flatiron District as the location for their massive food and drink complex, Eataly.RECOMMENDED: Gramercy and Flatiron guide ABC Kitchen While plenty of New York restaurants have lately made the environment a priority—sourcing their ingredients locally and crafting dining rooms from salvaged materials—none have done so with quite as much visual and gastronomic panache as chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s new ABC Kitchen. The chef’s “hippie” restaurant, as he’s taken to calling it—a joint venture with his home furnishings landlord—is a stunner, as artfully merchandised as the shop that surrounds it. Everything, including the antique armoires, reclaimed-wood tables, porcelain plates and chandeliers entwined with flowering vines is gathered from area artisans. Though the restaurant’s sustainable ethos is outlined on the back of the menu like an Al Gore polemic, the cooking, based on the most gorgeous ingredients from up and down the East Coast, delivers one message above all: Food that’s good for the planet

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Greenwich Village

Discover the best restaurants and cafés in Greenwich Village in New York City, including critics' picks and affordable options. Greenwich Village boasts a wide range of fine restaurants, from hot spot Minetta Tavern (home to one of the best burgers in NYC) to Thai restaurants Kin Shop and Lotus of Siam. In a nod to NYU's presence, there's also a profusion of cheap eats, like pizza joint Artichoke Basille's.RECOMMENDED: Greenwich Village guide Critics picks in Greenwich Village Ushiwakamaru It’s no surprise that Japan-philes flock to this austere restaurant: Those new to the cuisine might not know what to make of the tiny cube of green-tea tofu that’s served as an amuse-bouche, or the shrimp heads floating in the miso soup. Entrées feature classic maki (no Elvis roll here), sushi and sashimi, and little else. Put yourself in the hands of chef-owner Hideo Kuribara and you’ll be richly rewarded. A special might include sushi pieces topped with burstingly fresh salmon roe, the choicest slice of fatty tuna or a generous mound of shredded, fresh crab. Kuribara’s attention to quality and detail is ferocious: The wasabi is real (a rare luxury), and the intensely flavored, almost bitter, green-tea ice cream is house-made. Blue Hill More than a mere crusader for sustainability, Dan Barber is also one of the most talented cooks in town. He builds his oft-changing menu around whatever’s at its peak on his Westchester farm (home to a sibling restaurant). During fresh pea season br

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Harlem

Our Harlem restaurant guide points you to the best places to eat in the neighborhood, from trusty favorites to the latest hot spots. Known for soul food and the West African eateries of “Little Senegal” (W 116th St between St. Nicholas Ave and Morningside Park), the neighborhood’s restaurant scene has been revitalized by the arrival of Marcus Samuelsson’s eclectic hot spot Red Rooster Harlem, which spawned a subterranean lounge, Ginny’s Supper Club. Our Harlem restaurant guide also includes cheap eats and select brunch places.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Harlem, New York Chez Lucienne Harlem gains an ambitious French bistro from Daniel alums Jerome Bougherdani and chef Matthew Tivy. The 60-seat space, with its globe lights and powder-blue banquettes, evokes a classic bistro, while dishes from the Lyon, France-born executive chef, Thomas Obaton, range from the traditional (beef bourguignonne) to the bold (calf’s-foot croquettes). Dinosaur Bar-B-Que Weathered gas-station signage and barbershop mirrors constitute the artfully gritty decor at this honky-tonk saloon. The old Harlem meatpacking warehouse sees a heady parade of low-country favorites like fried-green tomatoes, chicken wings and beer-boiled shrimp. But true ’cue lovers should go straight for the meat: Fork-tender beef brisket, succulent ribs and juicy pulled pork get a dry rub, up to 18 hours of smoking over hickory, apple and cherry woods, and are finished with a slather of sweet-spicy secret sauce. Lido The team

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Hell’s Kitchen

Our Hell’s Kitchen restaurant guide points you to critic-approved places to eat in the neighborhood, including trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. Daisy May’s BBQ USA Southerners know that the best barbecue comes from run-down shacks in the worst parts of town—so don’t let the location of Daisy May’s BBQ USA, on a desolate stretch of Eleventh Avenue, or its college-town atmosphere deter you: Daisy May’s, despite a few missteps (the pulled pork is overstewed in its own sauce), is the real down-home deal, a masterful barbecue survey. The Kansas City Sweet & Sticky Pork Ribs are meaty and just tender enough, while the creamed corn tastes like ballpark nachos—and that’s a good thing. The sweet tea with mint leaves will make you long for a front porch. Skip the desserts for a side of bourbon peaches, which calls to mind a drunken cobbler. Don Antonio by Starita While tourists bumble into Sbarro looking for a New York slice, pizza aficionados have been busy colonizing this pedigreed newcomer—a collaboration between Kesté’s talented Roberto Caporuscio and his decorated Naples mentor, Antonio Starita. Start with tasty bites like the frittatine (a deep-fried spaghetti cake oozing prosciutto cotto and béchamel sauce), before digging into the stellar wood-fired pies, which range from standards such as the Margherita to more creative constructions like the Rachetta, a racket-shaped pizza with a “handle” made of ricotta-stuffed dough. The main event, however, should be the habit-f

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Little Italy and Nolita

Which restaurants in Little Italy and Nolita stand out from the sea of red-sauce joints and trendy eateries? Check out our critic-approved selection. Though Manhattan’s traditional Italian stronghold is being squeezed out by Chinatown and Nolita, there are still some good Italian restaurants in Little Italy, including a venerable pizza joint, and new-school spots like Torrisi Italian Specialties and Parm are revitalizing the locale. There are also some culinary gems in Nolita.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Little Italy and Nolita Café Habana Nolita’s fashion-forward crowd storms this chrome corner fixture for the jumping scene and addictive grilled corn: char-grilled golden ears doused in fresh mayo and generously sprinkled with chili powder and grated cotija cheese. Staples include a respectable Cubano and crisp beer-battered catfish with spicy mayo. For dessert, try the eggy caramel flan. Those not willing to suffer the wait for a table can hit the takeout annex next door—you can get that corn, on a stick, to go. Da Nico If out-of-town guests insist on visiting Little Italy, steer them toward charming Da Nico. The solid red-sauce fare includes spaghetti with a chunky bolognese and entrées like hearty veal chops and salmon, simply grilled and spritzed with lemon. Keep an eye on the brick oven in the restaurant’s foyer—crisp pizzas emerge from it, topped with sweet sauce and plenty of melted mozzarella. If that doesn’t quell your rumbling belly, the gratis plate of piping-hot zep

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Lower East Side

Our critic-approved roundup points you to the best restaurants on the Lower East Side, including trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. Lower East Side pioneers wd~50 and Freemans paved the way for many a hot table in the neighborhood—San Francisco import Mission Chinese Food has joined the list of best restaurants on the Lower East Side. But don’t dismiss classic eateries from the pre-hipster era, including one of the city’s best Jewish delis.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Lower East Side Frankies Spuntino 17 Clinton Street The Manhattan outpost of Frankies is as beloved as the Brooklyn original. The no-reservations policy keeps a steady crowd angling for a table most evenings, and though there are just 26 seats, the restaurant feels cozy—not cramped. Nibble on cheeses, cured meats and salads, including a stellar combo of watercress, caramelized apple and Gorgonzola, while sipping one of 12 wines by the glass. If grazing isn’t your thing, more filling fare includes fork-tender porchetta with gigante beans and fennel agrodolce. Freemans This Lower East Side restaurant has come to be regarded as the tastemaking cabin-in-the-’hood at the end of the now-legendary alley. In the oft-copied taxidermied environs, the hearty menu additions include a charred tender quail atop buttery grits, and a generous rabbit roulade entrée of boneless bacon-wrapped bunny (the signature bar snacks remain—there wasn’t even a question of tampering with the cult artichoke dip). Simple desserts—caramel

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Soho

The Soho restaurant scene is constantly shifting—our critic-approved selection includes trusty favorites and the latest hot spots. Spanning everything from iconic brasserie Balthazar to more recent arrivals like Andrew Carmellini’s instant classic The Dutch and Michael White’s popular Bolognese tavern, Osteria Morini, the Soho restaurant scene is thriving. Whether you crave Jamaican jerk chicken or a standout lobster roll, you’ll find it here. There are also plenty of cheap eats and great brunch places.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Soho, New York Balthazar Not only is the iconic Balthazar still trendy, but the kitchen rarely makes a false step. At dinner, the place is perennially packed with rail-thin lookers dressed to the nines. But the bread is great, the food is good, and the service is surprisingly friendly. The $99 three-tiered seafood platter casts the most impressive shadow of any dish in town. The frisée aux lardons is exemplary. Roasted chicken on mashed potatoes for two, délicieux. Skate with brown butter and capers, yum. Don’t hate the patrons because they’re beautiful; just join them. Blue Ribbon Sushi Whether you settle on a $4 bowl of make-it-yourself miso soup and some California rolls, or opt for the top-of-the-line $125 chef’s choice sushi platter, you’ll find the service equally friendly and enthusiastic at this below-street-level Soho fave. The cooked dishes (like the miso-cured aged black cod) are worthy alternatives to the sushi, which, short of dining

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Affordable Manhattan restaurants

Chelsea

Cheap eats abound in Chelsea, but which stand out from the rest? Fuel up at our critic-approved budget food spots. Whether you want to line your stomach before hitting the bars (or soak up the damage afterwards) or grab an inexpensive bite while shopping, there are plenty of cheap eats in the neighborhood. Among our favorite cheap eats are the cult slice at Artichoke Basille’s Pizzeria and the eponymous Asian snacks at Rickshaw Dumpling Bar.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Chelsea, New York Artichoke Basille's Pizza and Bar The owners of the perpetually packed East Village slice shop have expanded to Chelsea. City Bakery Pastry genius Maury Rubin’s loft-size City Bakery is jammed with Chelsea shoppers loading up on unusual salad-bar choices (grilled pineapple with ancho chili, bean sprouts with smoked tofu, excellent salmon salad). There’s also a small selection of soups, pizzas and hot dishes. But to heck with all that: The thick, incredibly rich hot chocolate with fat house-made marshmallows is heaven in a cup (replaced by fruit-infused lemonade in the summer), and the moist “melted” chocolate-chip cookies are better than a marked-down pair of Prada pumps. Joe the Art of Coffee West Siders have experienced a restaurant revolution, and now they can boast grade-A espresso too, thanks to the most recent location of the boutique-coffee chain. In addition to espresso-based drinks, a single-cup, drip-coffee bar dispenses a rotating selection of brews, while baked goods from companies l

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Chinatown

Cheap eats abound in Chinatown, but which stand out from the rest? Fuel up at our critic-approved budget food spots. Chinatown excels at cheap eats. Whether you want to line your stomach before hitting the Lower East Side bars or grab an inexpensive bite while perusing local shops or nearby galleries, you can fill up on dumplings, noodles or more exotic fare for just a few bucks.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Chinatown, New York Mei Li Wah Bakery This tried-and-true mainstay continues to offer some of the freshest steamed buns in the city, each less than $1.64. If you only have a buck to your name, you can’t do much better than the classic pork bun (80¢), still one of the best deals in town. New Green Bo Since the windows to this tiny, cramped dining room have been plastered over with accolades from English-language press, it’s impossible to gauge the wait-time for this popular Shanghai restaurant unless the line snakes onto the sidewalk. Once inside, beware: the clunky oversized soup dumplings are strictly overrated, as are regional specialties such as suspiciously meatless “lion’s head” pork meatballs and greasy stir-fried rice cakes. Go esoteric instead with lip-smacking bamboo shoots, chunks of meat-like vegetarian kao fu and the juicy ginger crab. New Malaysia Restaurant The menu at New Malaysia Restaurant resembles those found in many Indian, Thai, Chinese and other Asian eateries—and with good reason: Malaysian cuisine comes from an amalgam of those cultures. So you’ll hav

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East Village

Cheap eats abound in East Village, but which stand out from the rest? Fuel up at our critic-approved budget food spots. Whether you want to take a break from shopping to refuel with an inexpensive bite, line your stomach before hitting the local bars (or soak up the damage afterwards), or embark on a full food crawl, there are plenty of cheap eats in the neighborhood. Feast on everything from cult slices and hot dogs to superlative slow-roasted pork for less than $15.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to East Village Artichoke Basille's Pizza & Brewery Early hype has led to long lines at this East Village pizzeria named after its specialty, a slice covered in a creamy artichoke-and-spinach spread. Bobwhite Lunch and Supper Counter Blue Smoke alum Amanda Beame dishes out at Southern classics updated with sustainable ingredients at this homestyle eatery. On the menu: fried free-range chicken, Hudson Valley collard greens and pimento cheese sandwiches. The simple 17-seat space features an L-shaped reclaimed-wood bar and exposed brick. Caracas Arepa Bar Surely, there’s no more cultured a substitute for a grilled cheese sandwich than a piping-hot arepa filled with juayanes, a handmade cheese. This endearing spot, with flower-patterned, vinyl-covered tables, zaps you straight to Caracas. The secret is in the arepas themselves: Each patty is made from scratch daily. The pitalike pockets are stuffed with a choice of 18 fillings, like chicken and avocado or mushrooms with tofu. Top off your snac

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Harlem

Cheap eats abound in Harlem, but which stand out from the rest? Fuel up at our critic-approved budget food spots. Whether you want to line your stomach before hitting the bars (or soak up the damage afterwards) or grab an inexpensive bite while shopping, you don’t have to resort to fast food. Cheap eats in Harlem include one of the city’s best fried chicken joints.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Harlem, New York Country Panfried Chicken Fried chicken has made quite the comeback, and now the guru of moist flesh and crackly skin, Charles Gabriel, is making his triumphant return to Harlem with this all-you-can-eat restaurant. In addition to the poultry, there will be barbecued ribs, mac and cheese, yams and other Southern favorites. Beurre & Sel Beloved cookbook author, blogger and baking maven Dorie Greenspan and son Josh are behind a pair of cookiecentric bakeshops. Snag Greenspan’s elegant treats: classic French vanilla sablés (shortbread), blueberry jammers topped with streusel, and her signature World Peace Cookies (Valrhona cocoa and extra-bitter chocolate with Guérande fleur de sel). East Dumpling House Columbia students can sate their dumpling cravings at this tiny eatery, whose cherrywood floors and brick walls dress up its cheap-eats mission. The purses come with mostly classic fillings like pork-and-chive, though a few original versions—such as “ugly” dumplings, buns stuffed with veggies and vermicelli—are also available. El Aguila This 22-seat outpost of a New Jersey tor

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Hell's Kitchen

Cheap eats abound in Hell’s Kitchen, but which stand out from the rest? Fuel up at our critic-approved budget food spots. Whether you're looking for an inexpensive pre- or post-theater bite, or want to line your stomach before hitting the local bars (or soak up the damage afterwards), there are plenty of cheap eats in the neighborhood. Feast on everything from authentic tacos to superior ramen for less than $15.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Hell's Kitchen Amy's Bread The hookup was bound to happen eventually: Beloved baker Amy Scherber has set up shop downtown right near Murray’s Cheese. It’s a dynamic duo if there ever was one. Scherber will offer her famous loaves—including that addictive raisin semolina—along with a full spread of breakfast pastries; grilled sandwiches, salads and soups for the lunch crowd, plus giant cookies and old-fashioned layer cakes. Blossom du Jour The 12-seat location of this café proves that vegan cuisine and comfort food aren't paradoxical terms. Look into the open kitchen, where chefs cook up meatless dishes, like the Midtown Melt (Cajun-spiced seitan, agave guacamole, vegan cheddar and chipotle aioli on rosemary focaccia) and a vegan burger with soy bacon and onion rings. Healthy organic fruit and vegetable juices are blended on site, including the Field of Green, which combines spinach, kale, ginger, lemon, apple, cucumber and parsley. City Sandwich Portuguese sandwiches are the specialty of this casual Hell's Kitchen restaurant. Donna Bell's Bak

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Little Italy and Nolita

Of course, Little Italy is known for its traditional Italian fare, but for the best cheap eats in the area, you may want to broaden the ethnic scope. Fill up on an Asian-accented hot dog or gourmet felafel. Alternatively, grab a superior sub or a slice of pizza, or head to Chinatown.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Little Italy and Nolita Where can you get the best cheap eats in the area? Bypass the tourist traps and head for one of these wallet-friendly spots. Asiadog The Brooklyn Flea favorite has set up permanent digs for its beloved East-meets-West hot dogs. As at their pop-up stalls, owners Melanie Campbell and Stephen Porto give classic American junk food an artisanal Asian spin at this tiny takeout shop. Toppings like kimchi, Japanese curry and Asian sesame slaw finish off beef, chicken and veggie dogs tucked into soft buns. This location's expanded menu also includes a deep-fried Korean pancake corn dog, salads and yam fries. Café Gitane Lingerers are welcome at this Parisian-style café, whether they’re outside smoking and sipping lattes or inside gossiping over salmon tartare in the cool blue- and orange-painted space. The clientele is almost too hip for an activity as mundane as eating. Too bad for them. The menu is full of appealing bites, such as merguez with raisin-and-pine-nut couscous, plus affordable beer and wine. Parm Rich Torrisi and Mario Carbone started small with their first project together, a sandwich shop that opened in 2009, serving hoagies by day and tas

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Lower East Side

Cheap eats abound on the Lower East Side, but which stand out from the rest? Fuel up at our critic-approved budget food spots. Whether you want to take a break from shopping to refuel with an inexpensive bite, line your stomach before hitting the local bars (or soak up the damage afterwards), there are plenty of cheap eats in the neighborhood. Feast on everything from superlative lox on a bagel to nouveau Chinese food for less than $15.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Lower East Side Congee Village There is comfort (and folk-medicinal healing properties) in congee, the Cantonese rice porridge that is the focus at this multilevel, always-packed LES standby. Choose among 29 versions—like the sliced pork with preserved egg, or chicken with black mushrooms, cooked over a low fire until bubbling. The rest of the expansive menu yields such finds as tender razor clams in black-bean sauce and impeccably fresh crabs. ’inoteca Friends gather at this LES haven and its sister spots, always abuzz with chatter, to share great food and affordable wine. The truffled-egg toast is the signature dish, but salads and antipasti (tender grilled calamari with borlotti beans and fennel; dense, delicious meatballs) are equally compelling when paired with a bottle from the list of small-producer Italian wines. The tables are tightly packed—diners seeking privacy can gather six or more friends and reserve a seat in the downstairs wine cellar. At the Flatiron location, in addition to the usual panini, there a

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Soho

Cheap eats abound in Soho, but which stand out from the rest? Fill up at our critic-approved budget food spots. Whether you want to take a break from shopping to refuel with an inexpensive bite, or line your stomach before hitting the local bars (or soak up the damage afterwards), there are plenty of cheap eats in the neighborhood. Feast on everything from tasty tacos to nicely priced Asian fusion fare.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Soho, New York Caffe Falai Iacopo Falai’s third downtown outpost melds the former pastry chef’s diverse skills: The place is at once a restaurant, a bakery and a café. Daytime diners linger over cappuccinos and crusty panini oozing with fillings like fontina and speck; at night, heartier offerings include charred baby octopus tossed onto slices of roasted potato. Rounding out the Renaissance man’s oeuvre are the artful desserts, including a citrus-and-strawberry bombe,plucked from the display case up front. The Ear Inn When it opened in 1830, the historic Ear Inn was popular with colorful characters ambling in from the docks of the Hudson. The basic decor (dark-wood bar, wobbly tables and chairs, lots of retro ephemera) hasn’t changed much since, but locals continue to pack the place thanks to its relaxed vibe and historical charm. Free snacks such as fried chicken and sausages can be had weeknights from 4 to 7pm, mitigating any wallet damage wreaked by a few $6 pints of Guinness. Fanelli’s Cafe Fanelli’s has stood at this cobblestoned Soho intersecti

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Tribeca

Cheap eats can be found alongside Tribeca’s upscale restaurants, but which stand out from the rest? Fuel up at our critic-approved budget food spots. Sure, there are plenty of pricey chefs’ flagships here, but we’ve sleuthed out the neighborhood’s standout cheap eats. Take a break from shopping with artisanal coffee and locally baked pastries, or take your sweetie to one of the area’s best date spots without damaging your wallet.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Tribeca, New York Capri Caffe A Mediterranean-tiled interior and Christmas-light-trimmed awning have attracted Tribeca’s daytime workforce to this popular luncheonette. But it’s the toothsome Caprese fare, such as tramezzini sandwiches layered with grilled vegetables and house-made mozzarella, that keeps the 17 seats filled. It’s also a good option for dinner. Pastas, prepared on a two-burner stove, include perfectly al dente rigatoni lightly coated in bolognese. It’s just a matter of time before the lunch crowd starts returning at night. La Colombe Torrefaction This Philadelphia-based coffee company roasts all of its beans—which are often sourced through direct trade—and sells pastries from Ceci-Cela. Pakistani Tea House The bright lights and linoleum at this Pakistani eatery may not be sexy, but the alluring fragrance of freshly baked nan and South Asian home cooking is plenty seductive. A mere six bucks buys you any of three saucy dishes, like chicken curry, chicken makhani (butter chicken), saag panir (spinach with chees

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West Village

Cheap eats abound in the West Village, but which stand out from the rest? Fuel up at our critic-approved budget food spots. Whether you want to line your stomach before hitting the bars (or soak up the damage afterwards) or grab an inexpensive bite while shopping, there are plenty of cheap eats in the neighborhood, from Corner Bistro’s lauded no-frills burgers to some of the city’s best burritos.RECOMMENDED: Full guide to West Village Amy’s Bread The hookup was bound to happen eventually: Beloved baker Amy Scherber has set up shop downtown right near Murray’s Cheese. It’s a dynamic duo if there ever was one. Scherber will offer her famous loaves—including that addictive raisin semolina—along with a full spread of breakfast pastries; grilled sandwiches, salads and soups for the lunch crowd, plus giant cookies and old-fashioned layer cakes. It’s open until midnight on weekends for a late-night sugar fix. Corner Bistro The burgers at this dimly lit Village standby are legendary, and the New Yorkers who love them legion. You may have to wait in line for a good hour to get your hands on one (and you will need both hands). Fortunately, several $2.50 drafts (including McSorley’s Ale) will help you bide your time, as will the Yankees on the tube, and a jukebox that plays everything from Calexico to Coltrane. Go for the Bistro Burger, a fat patty of broiled beef, cheese and smoky bacon on a sesame-seed bun for $6.75. A plate of crisp shoestring fries will run you $2.50, but they’re to

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