Get us in your inbox

Search
Installation view of Takuro Kuwata, at Strange Clay: Photo: Mark Blower. Courtesy the Hayward Gallery.
Installation view of Takuro Kuwata, at Strange Clay: Photo: Mark Blower. Courtesy the Hayward Gallery.

Top 10 art exhibitions in London

Check out our critics’ picks of the ten best art shows coming up in the capital at some of the world’s best art galleries

Written by
Eddy Frankel
&
Time Out London Art
Advertising

This city is absolutely rammed full of amazing art galleries and museums. Want to see a priceless Monet? A Rothko masterpiece? An installation of little crumpled bits of paper? A video piece about the evils of capitalism? You can find it all right here in this city. London’s museums are all open as normal again, and the city’s independents are back in business. So here, we’ve got your next art outing sorted with the ten best shows you absolutely can’t miss. 

The ten best art exhibitions in London

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Bankside

An ancient petrified forest has creaked forebodingly into life at Tate Modern. Polish artist Magdalena Abakanowicz’s huge, towering forms hover around you as you walk around this show of her work, enormous fabric sculptures that have emerged from some bog, and now hang in the dark, threatening to envelop and smother you. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Soho

Chris Killip might not be as well known as Martin Parr or have the cult kudos of Tony Ray-Jones, but the work he produced in the 1970s and ’80s arguably stands above either of them. Killip was born on the Isle of Man and returned there after quitting commercial photography in the early 1970s to concentrate on the communities he grew up amongst.

Advertising
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • South Bank

Ceramics aren’t meant to be in an art gallery. They’re the pots your plants are in, the plates your dinner’s on, they’re your bathroom tiles, your toilet. Ceramics are domestic, utilitarian, and that thing art is never meant to be: craft. And obviously that’s all bollocks because the Hayward’s put on a whole show of work by artists who use clay and it’s just as valid as any painting or marble sculpture. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Strand

It can’t be pleasant being Richard Mosse. The Irish photographer has spent his career documenting the ravages of war and the pain of migration, and now he’s turned his high tech scientific imaging cameras on the devastation of the Amazon. Can’t be a lot of laughs in his life. 

Advertising
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Barbican

The Barbican Curve is full of ghosts, the spectres of bold, creative, amazing women from pre-revolution Iran, captured on fragile vellum in painstaking detail by Soheila Sokhanvari. These 28 cultural figures worked, created, lived and loved with a freedom that was taken away with the 1979 revolution, and still hasn’t been won back. 

Advertising
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Chalk Farm

In video games, you can be whoever you want to be. By day, you might be Tim from accounts, but once you get home, you’re an ancient assassin, a Norse god, an orc or an elite Marine. You can create an avatar, you can choose a new body, a new nose, a new gender. 

Advertising
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Millbank

A cheeky smile can get you pretty far in life, and even further in art. Just ask Mona Lisa, her semi-smirk has helped make her the most famous painting ever. That’s because that smile is enigmatic: we don’t know why it’s there or what it represents. English painter Lynette Yiadom-Boakye pushes that idea – the enigma of the portrait – to an extreme.

Recommended

    More on Love Local

      You may also like
        Advertising

        The best things in life are free.

        Get our free newsletter – it’s great.

        Loading animation
        Déjà vu! We already have this email. Try another?

        🙌 Awesome, you're subscribed!

        Thanks for subscribing! Look out for your first newsletter in your inbox soon!