Get us in your inbox

Single All the Way
Photograph: NetflixSingle All the Way

The 30 best feelgood movies on British Netflix right now

Brighten your spirits with some of the best feelgood films Netflix has to offer

Written by
Andy Kryza
Written by
Phil de Semlyen
&
Alim Kheraj
Advertising

After anothe long year, a good feelgood movie is comfort food. Thankfully, Netflix is a goldmine for the warm and fuzzies.  of feelgood films that will leave you all warm and fuzzy, should you need a pick-me-up.

Our list of the best feelgood movies to stream includes everything from Netflix originals like To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before and Set It Up, to favourites such as Mamma Mia! and even a stealthily uplifting Borat successor. Oh, and for a little extra holly-jolliness, we’ve included a few holiday flicks too. Whether you’re in the mood for a musical or a romcom, here’s our guide to the 30 best feel good movies streaming on Netflix UK that are guaranteed to cheer you up.

Recommended: Not a Netflix fan? Here are the 30 best films streaming on Amazon Prime UK right now.

Feelgood movies on Netflix

Single All the Way (2021)
Photograph: Netflix

Single All the Way (2021)

Director: Michael Mayer

Cast: Michael Urie, Philemon Chambers, Jennifer Coolidge

Easily the best of Netflix’s avalanche of original holiday content in 2021, this might also be the year’s best romcom: the story of a man who convinces his best buddy to pretend to be his boyfriend in order to placate his matchmaking family. Any film featuring cinematic treasure Jennifer Coolidge as Glinda the Good Witch in a community theatre Christmas pageant is instantly watchable, but it’s the great big heart at the centre that positions Single all the Way for perennial status.

Matilda (1996)
  • Film
  • Family and kids

Director: Danny DeVito

Cast: Mara Wilson, Danny DeVito, Pam Ferris

Danny DeVito's snappy, kinetic visual adaptation of this Roald Dahl classic fits the cartoon feel of the source material, and the cast is great. It’s a modern-day pantomime about childhood solidarity and self-empowerment: the real joy here is the view of generational war, the children’s assumption of zero tolerance for injustices inflicted by absurd adults, and the recognition that the big meanies should be punished, by fair means or foul.

Advertising
Set It Up (2018)

Set It Up (2018)

Director: Claire Scanlon

Cast: Zoey Deutch, Glen Powell, Taye Diggs, Lucy Liu

Director Claire Scanlon resurrects that tragically neglected genre, the romcom, with this amiable caper. The premise – two put-upon assistants (Glen Powell and Zoey Deutch) try to trick their bosses-from-hell as payback for their own stresses – is relatively well-trodden territory, but it’s executed deftly and boasts no little heart. There are even a few genuine laugh-out-loud moments sprinkled among the romantic fare, with Lucy Liu proving that when it comes to comedy she knows how to deliver.

  • Film
  • Drama

Director: Lulu Wang

Cast: Awkwafina, Shuzhen Zhao

On paper, Lulu Wang’s deeply personal The Farewell sounds like a heartbreaker: It centres on a Chinese-American girl (Awkwafina) traveling to China to say goodbye to her grandmother, who is blissfully unaware that she has terminal cancer. Under the guise of a fake wedding, the family gets together for one last celebration with their matriarch. It sounds grim, but what unfolds is a stirring and affirming story of family, one that finds vibrant life among its ensemble even as the spectre of death looms. This is a film about embracing individualism and celebrating life, and it’s a joy from beginning to end… especially when the mid-credits stinger pulls the rug out from under viewers in the best way imaginable. 

Advertising
To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before (2018)
Photograph: Masha Weisberg/Netflix

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before (2018)

Director: Susan Johnson

Cast: Lana Condor, Noah Centineo

To deal with her intense crushes, Lara Jean (Lana Condor) writes secret love letters to the boys she lusts after, which no one is ever meant to see. Of course, these letters end up being sent out and Lara Jean must deal with her feelings, and the implications of the letters, head on. The sequel to the sequel –To All the Boys: Always and Forever – landed on Netflix earlier this year. The romcom is officially back, baby.

Paddington (2014)
  • Film
  • Family and kids

Director: Paul King

Cast: Sally Hawkins, Nicole Kidman, 

Paul King’s adaptation of the lovable Peruvian bear’s adventures as an immigrant in London has become internet shorthand for feelgood entertainment (even if some curmudgeonly critic recently took the sequel down a peg), but the films more than live up to their hype. The first Paddington, like its more vaunted sequel, is a silly, sincere tale of a curious critter whose dedication to kindness and decency are downright infectious, a film that is as bighearted as its hero and as sweet as a marmalade sandwich. Bring on the threequel!

Advertising
  • Film
  • Comedy

Director: Richard Curtis

Cast: Hugh Grant, Emma Thompson, Bill Nighy, Colin Firth

Feel that in your toes? That’s right… Christmas is all around us, and that means the inevitability of watching Love Actually, Richard Curtis’s sprawling tale of big holiday feelings. And while some of the stories are decidedly less sunny than we like to remember – somebody please get Andrew Garfield to therapy, and Hugh Grant before an ethics committee – little Thomas Brodie-Sangster’s mad dash through the airport in the name of true love is enough to soften even the most cynical heart.

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
  • Film
  • Comedy

Directors: Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam

Cast: Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Eric Idle

It may lack the satire-with-a-purpose edge of Life of Brian, but Holy Grail is the sillier, funnier film, packed with goofy laughs rather than hey-I-get-that cleverness. It’s aged better too, less beholden to notions of revolutionary politics and more reliant on slapstick violence, sudden explosions, surrealist wordplay and scatological asides. You’d be an empty-headed animal food-trough-wiper not to tee it up asap.

Advertising
  • Film
  • Comedy

Director: Chris and Paul Weitz

Cast: Hugh Grant, Nicholas Hoult, Toni Collette

Hugh Grant goes full grinch as a layabout manchild living off the royalties from a Christmas song that his father wrote (it’s called ‘Santa’s Super Sleigh’ and it’s an absolute banger). In a twist of fate, he meets a tween (Nicholas Hoult) from a troubled household who melts his icy heart. It sounds schmaltzy, but this is the ideal compromise between cynics and true believers thanks to the Nick Hornby adaptation’s acerbic humour.

Kiki's Delivery Service (1989)
  • Film
  • Animation

Director: Hayao Miyazaki

Cast: Kirsten Dunst, Phil Hartman (English dub)

Like My Neighbour Totoro, Hayao Miyazaki’s fleet, whimsical tale of a young witch coming of age in Scandinavia is a rare animated adventure almost completely void of conflict, peril or villainy: It is, in essence, a hangout movie about a young girl and her smartass talking cat making friends, exploring nature and getting into mischief. As such, it’s a pure delight. And lest that description make things sound slightly dull, there’s a climactic incident involving a runaway blimp that ranks among Studio Ghibli’s most exciting action set pieces, full stop.

Advertising
The Holiday (2006)
  • Film
  • Comedy

Director: Nancy Meyers

Cast: Kate Winslet, Cameron Diaz, Jude Law

Like a box of chocolates that you gobble up before Christmas dinner is even served, this cutesy romcom from feelgood queen Nancy Meyers – in which Cameron Diaz romances Jude Law in an English country cottage – should make you feel queasy. But there’s something unbearably lovely about The Holiday that reels you in. It doesn’t hurt that the LA-set secondary plot features Kate Winslet on top form as a British journalist who forges an unlikely friendship with an ageing Hollywood director and gets cosy with Jack Black.

Bad Trip (2020)
Photograph: Netflix

Bad Trip (2020)

Director: Kitao Sakura
Cast: Eric André, Lil Rel Howery, Tiffany Haddish

Bad Trip takes its cues from prank movies Bad Grandpa and Borat in telling the story of a lovestruck loser (Eric André) road-tripping across the American south in pursuit of true love. But something truly unexpected happens amid the gushes of blood and vomit André unleashes on unsuspecting bystanders who have no idea they’re in a movie: he finds genuine compassion. Unlike Sacha Baron Cohen, André doesn’t end up exposing the creeps lurking in America’s dark underbelly. He unearths kindness and helping hands in even the most ludicrous set-ups. That he does so while spraying bodily fluids everywhere is some kind of miracle that borders on genuinely moving. No film this gross should make you feel this good about humanity.

Advertising
  • Film

Director: Jim Henson

Cast: Jennifer Connelly, David Bowie

Jim Henson’s finest Muppet-less hour – with apologies to the Fraggle Rock diehards out there – this rollicking fairy tale adventure is almost impossible to resist. If you’re new to it, it has teenage Jennifer Connelly negotiating myriad dangers to reclaim her baby brother from the talons of the Goblin King (David Bowie). Bowie gyrates with puppet goblins. Baby is rescued. Everyone goes home happy. Trust us, it’s a joy – and the songs are underrated, too.

Someone Great (2019)
Netflix/Sarah Shatz

Someone Great (2019)

Director: Jennifer Kaytin Robinson

Cast: Gina Rodriguez, Brittany Snow, DeWanda Wise

This romcom might not be the most original or groundbreaking addition to the genre, but sometimes if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Instead, focus on friendship and the chemistry that this film’s three female leads have in abundance. 

Advertising
Falling Inn Love (2019)
Nicola Dove / Netflix

Falling Inn Love (2019)

Director: Roger Kumble

Cast: Christina Milian, Adam Demos, Jeffrey Bowyer-Chapman

The concept of this film is preposterous: an American woman loses everything but then happens to win a New Zealand inn (?!) which she attempts to renovate and flip with the help of her hunky contractor. Naturally, their relationship gets complicated. Essentially it’s a hit of sugar and who can complain about that? 

The Little Prince (2015)
  • Film
  • Animation

Director Mark Osborne

Cast Rachel McAdams, Jeff Bridges, Mackenzie Foy (voices)

This sweet, faithful adaptation of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s much-loved book skipped the cinema and landed straight on Netflix. It’s a charming mix of computer animation and stop-motion, as it follows a young girl who is told the familiar tale by the book’s now elderly pilot, who recalls crashing in the desert where he meets the titular alien.

Advertising
  • Film

Director: Nahnatchka Khan

Cast: Ali Wong, Randall Park

Netflix continues its romcom reign with this touching and funny film about childhood friends Sasha and Marcus (played by Ali Wong and Randall Park) who have a falling out and don’t speak for 15 years. Brought back together when Sasha, now a celebrity chef, returns to her hometown of San Francisco to open a new restaurant, she finds her former friend to be a happily complacent musician still living at home and working for his dad. Naturally, things become complicated... especially when an unexpected actor makes one of the best cameos of the 21st century.

  • Film
  • Fantasy

Director: Steven Spielberg

Cast: Henry Thomas, Dee Wallace, Drew Barrymore

The ultimate Spielbergian family adventure is the perfect summer blockbuster for melting cold winter hearts. It doesn’t matter how old you are or how many times you’ve seen it, each beat of this classic is perfectly calibrated for maximum awe. From the soaring lunar bike-ride to the tear duct-decimating croak of ‘I’ll be right here,’ E.T. is further proof that while Spielberg is often imitated (lookin’ at you, Stranger Things), he’ll never be bettered. 

Advertising
  • Film
  • Comedy

Director Ari Sandel

Cast Mae Whitman, Bella Thorne

Mae Whitman has oodles of charm as the down-to-earth lead of this harmlessly predictable high school comedy. Realising she’s known as the ‘duff’, a Designated Ugly Fat Friend, guys talk to to get to their hotter mates, she sets about reinventing herself. But a message of acceptance wins out in the end.

  • Film
  • Comedy

Director: Will Gluck

Cast: Emma Stone, Penn Badley, Stanley Tuccci

Will Gluck’s twenty-first-century take on Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter is a film that brings the spunk back to the teen comedy. Stone plays Olive, a straight-A student who taps into her school’s rumour mill for social clout and financial gain. If you like your teen comedies with real jokes and skewed morals, this one is for you.  

Advertising
  • Film
  • Comedy

Director Phil Traill

Cast Felicity Jones, Ed Westwick

Rogue One star Felicity Jones is at the heart of this fluffy, fun British romcom. She plays Kim, a working-class skateboard champion who becomes a chalet girl after her mum’s death – and ends up falling for a wealthy (and taken) client. 

  • Film
  • Comedy

Director: David Dobkin

Cast: Will Ferrell, Rachel McAdams, Dan Stevens

This is one of those films that on paper really should not work. And, depending on your taste, you might feel that Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga is, in fact, a disaster. If you’re able to take it at face value, though, then this very sweet musical about two aspiring musicians from Iceland whose life-long dream is to represent their country at the Eurovision Song Contest is a real delight. It features cameos from previous Eurovision contestants, and the songs are genuinely good. Don’t believe us? Play ‘Jaja Ding Dong’!

Advertising
  • Film
  • Fantasy

Director: Steven Spielberg

Cast: Dustin Hoffman, Robin Williams, Julia Roberts

While not critically adored at the time of release, this rejigged tale about an all-grown-up Peter Pan and his ongoing feud with Captain Hook has become a cult classic. Robin Williams is great, as is a campy Dustin Hoffman, and we challenge you not to want to run away with the Lost Boys. Yes it’s sweet and sentimental, but it’s also a lot of fun. 

  • Film
  • Comedy

Director: Richard Linklater

Cast: Jack Black, Joan Cusack, Mike White

Jack Black stars in this musical comedy that’s proved so popular that it's been adapted for the stage and spawned a TV reboot. Black plays Dewey Finn, a washed up musician who gets kicked out of his band only to be informed by his roommate that if he can’t pay the rent he’s out. Desperate, he impersonates said roommate and takes on a job as a substitute teacher, only to recruit a class of school kids to compete against his former band in the local Battle of the Bands contest. Think Sister Act 2, but with added guitars.

Advertising
Enola Holmes (2020)
Photograph: ROBERT VIGLASKI /LEGENDARY ©2020

Enola Holmes (2020)

Director Harry Bradbeer

Cast Millie Bobby Brown, Henry Cavill, Helena Bonham Carter

Do we need another film set in the world of Sherlock Holmes? Is it weird for Sherlock to take a back seat in it? Is Millie Bobby Brown a movie star? This light-footed caper answers all those questions – yes, no and hell yes – over two hours of giddying, female-led crime-solving. It’s an action-packed, super-sleuthing rush.

The best films on Netflix UK

The 30 best movies on Netflix UK
  • Film

Feeling overwhelmed or uninspired by the choice on Netflix UK? We’ve all been there. If you can’t decide what to watch, try one of these solid gold winners – and take your pick from hilarious comedy movies, reach-for- the-tissues heartwarmers and Oscar-winning nail-biting dramas.

Recommended

    More on Netflix

      You may also like
        Advertising