Arts & Entertainment

Your complete guide to Kuala Lumpur's art exhibitions, theatre plays, musicals, comedy, movie reviews and film trailers

Black Panther
Film

Black Panther

For all their global dominance, everybody wants these superhero movies to be better: funnier, smarter, more inclusive, more super. A huge step in the right direction, ‘Black Panther’ is that dream come true.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
New art spaces and galleries to check out in KL
Art

New art spaces and galleries to check out in KL

We check out some of the newest art spaces and galleries around the city – from Kampung Attap all the way to Klang. Now go earn some #CultureVulture points.

Molly's Game
Film

Molly's Game

Aaron Sorkin’s distinct verbal cadences have been so recognisable in so many movies and TV shows, it’s strange to think that he’s never directed any of them himself. Rise-and-fall poker tale ‘Molly’s Game’ finally changes that. It’s a real-life story about a regular high-stakes Hollywood game. Unsurprisingly, the one-upmanship among arrogant gamblers and big cheeses fits effortlessly into Sorkin’s universe, resulting in a wild ride with smarts to burn. We meet soon-to-be-ex-Olympic-skier Molly Bloom (a terrific Jessica Chastain) moments before a freak accident curtails her career. Following her recovery, she halts her law school plans and moves to LA, where a shady businessman (Jeremy Strong) offers an intro to his underground poker games. From there, she takes over, upgrades them and unwittingly gets mixed up with organised crime. When the FBI raids her home, she hires New York lawyer Charlie Jaffey (Idris Elba) to run her defence. Despite an underbaked effort to boil Molly’s defiance down to a father-daughter story – an overindulged Sorkin instinct in ‘Jobs’ too – ‘Molly’s Game’ rips along at pace. A sharply judged edit stitches together three separate timelines, shaping Molly as a complex and razor-sharp character in a world dominated by entitled mansplainers. Forget ‘Rounders’ – here’s a poker movie to go all-in on. 

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
What's the deal with: Malaysia Design Archive
Art

What's the deal with: Malaysia Design Archive

Learn about Malaysia Design Archive's efforts to preserve the visual history of Malaysia

Ten essential books by Malaysians for Malaysians
Things to do

Ten essential books by Malaysians for Malaysians

If you're unfamiliar with Malaysian literature, here are ten books by Malaysian authors ranging from fiction, non-fiction and poetry in both English and Bahasa Malaysia, suitable for beginners

Latest film reviews and releases

Black Panther
Film

Black Panther

For all their global dominance, everybody wants these superhero movies to be better: funnier, smarter, more inclusive, more super. A huge step in the right direction, ‘Black Panther’ is that dream come true. Proudly African – even if its Africa comes in the form of the fictional country of Wakanda, a powerhouse of secret technologies – Marvel’s latest is, from top to bottom, a conscious reversal of racial paradigms. Handsomely mounted by ‘Creed’ director Ryan Coogler and starring an enviable slate of black actors that makes cameoing comics godhead Stan Lee almost seem lost, the film is provocative and satisfying in ways that are long overdue, like its ornate, culturally dense production design and the deeper subtexts of honor, compassion and destiny. Wakanda’s young king, T’Challa (a dignified Chadwick Boseman, well-seasoned after playing onscreen versions of James Brown, Jackie Robinson and Thurgood Marshall), recognizes that the world outside his peaceful realm is a divisive place. Still, even as his own armor-clad excursions as Black Panther set up an internal tension between isolationism and responsibility (yes, this is the rare blockbuster with something on its mind), tensions within Wakanda—fomented by exile-turned-rebel Erik Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan, on fire)—threaten to bring him down. In their script, Coogler and Joe Robert Cole take inspiration from the Black Panther’s 50-year history on the page, including a dazzling current run by author Ta-Nehisi Coates, an

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Molly's Game
Film

Molly's Game

Aaron Sorkin’s distinct verbal cadences have been so recognisable in so many movies and TV shows, it’s strange to think that he’s never directed any of them himself. Rise-and-fall poker tale ‘Molly’s Game’ finally changes that. It’s a real-life story about a regular high-stakes Hollywood game. Unsurprisingly, the one-upmanship among arrogant gamblers and big cheeses fits effortlessly into Sorkin’s universe, resulting in a wild ride with smarts to burn. We meet soon-to-be-ex-Olympic-skier Molly Bloom (a terrific Jessica Chastain) moments before a freak accident curtails her career. Following her recovery, she halts her law school plans and moves to LA, where a shady businessman (Jeremy Strong) offers an intro to his underground poker games. From there, she takes over, upgrades them and unwittingly gets mixed up with organised crime. When the FBI raids her home, she hires New York lawyer Charlie Jaffey (Idris Elba) to run her defence. Despite an underbaked effort to boil Molly’s defiance down to a father-daughter story – an overindulged Sorkin instinct in ‘Jobs’ too – ‘Molly’s Game’ rips along at pace. A sharply judged edit stitches together three separate timelines, shaping Molly as a complex and razor-sharp character in a world dominated by entitled mansplainers. Forget ‘Rounders’ – here’s a poker movie to go all-in on. 

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Darkest Hour
Film

Darkest Hour

Sure, Christopher Nolan’s 'Dunkirk' blew us away with its immersiveness. But if you prefer your WWII movies to have a little dialogue, some shapeliness and a bit of powerhouse acting, director Joe Wright’s tense profile of the rising prime minister Winston Churchill is the war film to beat. Wright, it’s worth remembering, has been on those gory French beaches before with 2007’s ''Atonement', capturing the whole of the British evacuation and its surrounding chaos in a legendary five-minute tracking shot. As if pulling a been-there-'Dunkirk'-that, he now shifts to the tense strategy sessions, bunker hand-wringing and political gamesmanship that fed into England’s finest hour. 'Darkest Hour' is a film of verbal ammunition, and its calibre is high.At first you won’t believe your eyes, seeing Gary Oldman – still, in some perverse way, the alive presence from 'Sid and Nancy' – buried under what must be pounds of prosthetic facial architecture. (The radical makeup work is by artist Kazuhiro Tsuji.) But your mind quickly gets you where you need to be, as we watch Oldman’s Churchill roughing up our expectations: crouching on his bedroom floor to capture a wayward cat, downing a breakfast of Scotch and cigars and mixing it up with his cowed, dutiful secretary Elizabeth (Lily James). The performance is a marvel, not merely leaping over what could have been a stunt, but deepening into a soulful portrayal of wartime leadership, tinged with ego, doubt and the demands of a terrible moment.C

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
The Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Film

The Maze Runner: The Death Cure

Somewhere between the beloved, blockbusting ‘Hunger Games’ and the fizzled-out ‘Divergent’ franchise, Young Adult dystopia has found its uncomfortable middle ground in director Wes Ball’s ‘Maze Runner’ trilogy. Adapted from James Dashner’s novel, this weighty third chapter continues the series’s concerted journey away from the intensely contained, high-concept action-puzzle milieu of 2014’s ‘The Maze Runner’ into less interesting, more familiar genre territory. So where last instalment ‘The Scorch Trials’ took us out of the monster-stalked labyrinth into a parched, depopulated ‘Mad Max’-meets-‘I Am Legend’ wasteland, ‘The Death Cure’ draws us into a skyscraper-packed, ‘Blade Runner’-ish metropolis. ‘I know it’s hard, but act like you’ve seen it before,’ one character says to gawping young hero Thomas (Dylan O’Brien) on arrival. No, not hard at all. Having survived robot-spider-things and raging zombies, the earnest Thomas and his fresh-faced compadres are on a mission to rescue their one-time maze-running bro, Minho (Ki Hong Lee), having lost him to shady white-coat corporation WCKD following a devastating act of betrayal by Thomas’s kinda-girlfriend Teresa (Kaya Scodelario). For Teresa, the end (saving humanity from a killer virus) justifies the means (torturing virus-immune children to extract serum). For Thomas, freedom – from human lab-rat torture, mostly – is paramount. The moral wrangling doesn’t get more complex than that, and takes a back seat to the action, which

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
See all Time Out film reviews

Film and TV features

Saw Teong Hin interview
Film

Saw Teong Hin interview

Director Saw Teong Hin talks about his latest movie and first Penang Hokkien feature film 'You Mean the World to Me'

Dain Said interview
Film

Dain Said interview

The charismatic filmmaker talks identity, literature and his distaste for nostalgia

U-Wei Haji Saari interview
Film

U-Wei Haji Saari interview

Director U-Wei Haji Saari talks about his latest film, ‘Hanyut’, and the lost art of storytelling

Everything you need to know about ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’
Film

Everything you need to know about ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’

From trailers to casting news, details about sequels and the release date – here’s everything you need to know about JK Rowling’s new movie set in the wizarding world of Harry Potter