Arts & Entertainment

Your complete guide to Kuala Lumpur's art exhibitions, theatre plays, musicals, comedy, movie reviews and film trailers

Hidden Figures
Film

Hidden Figures

As inspiring as the red glare of rockets heading into space, this huge-hearted crowd-pleaser has a sophisticated idea running through it: by and large, busy scientists don’t have time for racism or sexism

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
The best film screenings in KL this month
Film

The best film screenings in KL this month

When the latest blockbusters just wouldn't cut it, head to these film screenings for documentaries, local films and festival picks.

Sneak peek: 'Afterwork' exhibition at Ilham Gallery
Blog

Sneak peek: 'Afterwork' exhibition at Ilham Gallery

Ilham Gallery welcomes the New Year with a group exhibition – in partnership with Hong Kong’s Art Para Site – titled ‘Afterwork’.

Dain Said interview
Film

Dain Said interview

The charismatic filmmaker talks identity, literature and his distaste for nostalgia

The best Japanese anime shows for beginners
Film

The best Japanese anime shows for beginners

Japanese anime’s long and varied history makes the genre a tough nut to crack for most beginners. Ken W picks the best starter anime series to sink your teeth into.

Latest film reviews and releases

Logan
Film

Logan

America lies on the brink of ruin in this bleak and bruising comic-book road movie. It’s 2029 and Logan aka James Howlett aka The Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) is working as a limo driver in El Paso, Texas, occasionally hopping over the Mexican border to deliver much-needed pharmaceuticals to his Alzheimer's-stricken former mentor Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart). The mutant race has been all but wiped out thanks to a combination of shady government interference and Charles's own inability to control his powers. But when Logan is tasked with looking after Laura (Dafne Keen), the first mutant child born in decades, he's forced to make a decision: keep running, or gear up for one final stand. Jackman has repeatedly suggested that 'Logan' will mark his farewell to a character he's been tied to for 17 years and seven films. If so, it's a fitting swansong: in stark contrast to most Marvel movies, particularly last year's peppy but pointless 'X-Men: Apocalypse', this feels more like a wake than a party. The colours are muted, all rust-red and glowering grey, and the themes are weighty: loss, ageing and deep, almost unbearable regret. We're never given a full picture of how the world got so messed up, just glimpses of institutional brutality and corporate power, of ordinary people ground under the heel of an increasingly uncaring system. Given that the film went into production well before the earth-shaking events of November 2016, it all feels frighteningly prescient. It's also, with

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Hidden Figures
Film

Hidden Figures

As inspiring as the red glare of rockets heading into space, this huge-hearted crowd-pleaser has a sophisticated idea running through it: by and large, busy scientists don’t have time for racism or sexism. So it proved at Virginia’s Langley Research Center when, at the height of the 1960s space race (would ‘Space Race’ have been a better title?), African-American female mathletes were promoted to positions of critical importance to the Mercury programme, years before the flowering of the civil rights era. ‘Hidden Figures’ takes this underreported chapter of black history and makes it big, overplaying an already powerful scenario. Teetering bespectacled whiz Katherine Johnson (Taraji P Henson) finds herself correcting the calculations of scowling white men, while aspiring supervisor Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer) learns computer language in her spare time, and engineer Mary Jackson (Janelle Monáe) campaigns to attend college classes. They’re a trio of incredibly likeable nerds. If the movie puts them on equal footing with the astronauts and capsule designers themselves, it’s a corrective that can be forgiven. In its best moments, ‘Hidden Figures’ supplies the same work-the-problem thrills of ‘Apollo 13’ (if not the reach-for-the-stars rapture of ‘The Right Stuff’), and benefits enormously from Kevin Costner in full lefty righteous-rage mode as the Nasa director who smashes the sign off a segregated bathroom: ‘Here at Nasa, we all pee the same colour!’ To get to these stan

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
The Lego Batman Movie
Film

The Lego Batman Movie

The breakout star of 2014’s 'The Lego Movie' now gets his own action-packed, completely batshit superhero spinoff.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Split
Film

Split

M Night Shyamalan still takes himself deadly seriously, as if none of the flops after ‘The Sixth Sense’ ever happened. His latest thriller is ‘Split’, one of those sombre, cello-scored dramas about a clever psychopath

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
See all Time Out film reviews

Film and TV features

Dain Said interview
Film

Dain Said interview

The charismatic filmmaker talks identity, literature and his distaste for nostalgia

U-Wei Haji Saari interview
Film

U-Wei Haji Saari interview

Director U-Wei Haji Saari talks about his latest film, ‘Hanyut’, and the lost art of storytelling

Everything you need to know about ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’
Film

Everything you need to know about ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them’

From trailers to casting news, details about sequels and the release date – here’s everything you need to know about JK Rowling’s new movie set in the wizarding world of Harry Potter

Umapagan Ampikaipakan interview
Film

Umapagan Ampikaipakan interview

Umapagan Ampikaipakan strolls along eight of the city’s most prominent streets in his new TV show ‘Every Street Tells a Story’