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BFI Southbank

Cinemas, Independent South Bank
5 out of 5 stars
(19user reviews)
BFI Southbank

Time Out says

Formerly the National Film Theatre, this much-loved four-screen venue on the South Bank in Waterloo became the BFI Southbank in 2007. For film lovers who know their Kubrick from their Kurosawa, this is London's best cinema. Certainly, it's the city’s foremost cinema for director retrospectives and seasons programmed to showcase international work or films of specific genres or themes. It’s the flagship venue of the British Film Institute and plays home each year to the BFI’s London Film Festival and to the BFI’s seasons, such as 2014’s celebration of sci-fi. BFI Southbank also regularly hosts Q&As with some of the world’s leading filmmakers. The venue itself is a hot spot, with two bar-restaurants (one overlooking the river, nestled under Waterloo Bridge), a bookshop (good for DVDs too) and a library.

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Details

Address: Belvedere Rd
London
SE1 8XT
Transport: Tube: Waterloo
Price: £6-£19
Contact:
Opening hours: Check website for show times
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    Users say (19)

    5 out of 5 stars

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