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Mary Quant: Fashion Revolutionary

  • Art, Design
  1. Mary Quant (Photograph: Mary Quant and Vidal Sassoon, 1964. © Trinity Mirror / Mirrorpix / Alamy Stock Photo)
    Photograph: Mary Quant and Vidal Sassoon, 1964. © Trinity Mirror / Mirrorpix / Alamy Stock Photo
  2. Mary Quant (Photograph: Kellie Wilson modelling  shirtdress and shorts, 1966. Photo Duffy © Duffy Archive )
    Photograph: Kellie Wilson modelling shirtdress and shorts, 1966. Photo Duffy © Duffy Archive 
  3. Mary Quant (Photograph: Mary Quant tights and shoes, about 1965. Image courtesy Mary Quant Archive / Victoria and Albert Museum, London)
    Photograph: Mary Quant tights and shoes, about 1965. Image courtesy Mary Quant Archive / Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  4. Mary Quant (Photograph: c,1967. Mary Quant at the V&A (06 April 2019 – 16 February 2020). © Victoria and Albert Museum, London)
    Photograph: c,1967. Mary Quant at the V&A (06 April 2019 – 16 February 2020). © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  5. Mary Quant (Photograph: Mary Quant at the V&A (06 April 2019 – 16 February 2020). © Victoria and Albert Museum, London)
    Photograph: Mary Quant at the V&A (06 April 2019 – 16 February 2020). © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  6. Mary Quant (Photograph: Mary Quant and Alexander Plunket Greene, 1960 Courtesy of Terence Pepper Collection. © John Cowan Archive)
    Photograph: Mary Quant and Alexander Plunket Greene, 1960 Courtesy of Terence Pepper Collection. © John Cowan Archive
  7. Mary Quant (Photograph: Jill Kennington,1963. Ernestine Carter Archive, Fashion Museum Bath. Photograph by John Cowan © John Cowan Archive)
    Photograph: Jill Kennington,1963. Ernestine Carter Archive, Fashion Museum Bath. Photograph by John Cowan © John Cowan Archive
  8. Mary Quant (Photograph: Jean Shrimpton modelling ‘Rex Harrison’, 1962 © John French / Victoria and Albert Museum, London)
    Photograph: Jean Shrimpton modelling ‘Rex Harrison’, 1962 © John French / Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  9. Mary Quant (Photograph: Celia Hammond modelling ‘Coal Heaver’ (left) and Jean Shrimpton (right), 1962 Photograph by John French © John French / Victoria and Albert Museum, London)
    Photograph: Celia Hammond modelling ‘Coal Heaver’ (left) and Jean Shrimpton (right), 1962 Photograph by John French © John French / Victoria and Albert Museum, London
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Time Out says

British fashion revolutionary, Mary Quant, gets her own exhibition at Bendigo Art Gallery

When you think of 1960s fashion, you think of Mary Quant. The revolutionary designer changed the way young people dressed forever, encouraging them to be playful with fashion and to disregard the style of their parents and grandparents while also being one of the driving forces behind the Mod fashion movement. Heck, Quant is even credited as one of the designers who made mini skirts and hot pants a thing. 

Bendigo Art Gallery pays tribute to the influential British designer with a new, exclusive exhibition, Mary Quant: Fashion Revolutionary. The exhibition showcases Quant's work between 1955 and 1975, a time when she changed the way women dressed by making clothes fun and more readily available through mass production techniques. 

The exhibition comes direct from London's Victoria and Albert Museum, following a social media call out (the WeWantQuant campaign) that saw 800 women who wore Quant's clothes share their personal stories. The Bendigo Art Gallery exhibition features more than 110 colourful garments, plus accessories, cosmetics, sketches and photographs. No doubt guests will also see plenty of Quant's signature stylised daisy, which you've almost certainly seen.

Bendigo Art Gallery director, Jessica Bridgfoot, says: "Mary Quant is an icon whose fashion business emerged as a response to gloomy Post War Britain – and it comes to us at a time when we could all also use a lift."

Mary Quant: Fashion Revolutionary runs March 20 until July 11. Tickets are available now.

Nicola Dowse
Written by
Nicola Dowse

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