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The 50 best restaurants in Paris right now

From bistros and brasseries to Michelin fare – and everything in between – our local editors rank the best restaurants in Paris right now

Written by
Time Out editors
,
Tina Meyer
&
Antoine Besse
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At Time Out Paris, we’ve been eating and drinking our way around the City of Light for a long time. So we know what we’re talking about when it comes to good food – and right here, you’ll find our absolute favourite spots for 2023.

We’ve scoured the streets of Paris, reviewing every restaurant worth its salt in the capital. The result: our definitive ranking of the 50 best restaurants in Paris right now. (Unsurprisingly, lots of them also won big at our latest Time Out Food and Drink Awards.)

This year, fine-dining restaurant Le Clarence has taken our top spot for its intricate seasonal menu, and the newly-managed Grande Brasserie (taken on by Adrien Spanu in 2022) has made its way into the rankings for the very first time. But there’s no need to clutch your purse: this list isn’t just about the finer things in life. Whatever your budget, you’ll find something worth eating here – from sausage and mash in homely bistros to the best ham sandwich you’ve ever tasted for €5.

From classic French cooking to Japanese noodles, fresher-than-fresh seafood to best-in-class döner kebabs, these are the very best restaurants in Paris right now. Your table awaits…

This article was written by the editorial team at Time Out Paris. At Time Out, all of our travel guides are written by local writers who know their cities inside out. For more about how we curate, see our editorial guidelines.

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Best restaurants in Paris 2023

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Restaurants
  • Haute cuisine
  • Champs-Elysées
  • price 4 of 4

Le Clarence is more than just a meal; it's an extraordinary journey to a parallel world, full of crystal chandeliers and neoclassical paintings. It's the kind of place you imagine important figures from history might have dined once, taking place in a luxurious private mansion, overflowing with wood panelling, mouldings and velvet. Chef Christophe Pelé serves up an incredible seasonal menu – we loved the tempura shrimp, the baby eels and grilled red mullet with bone marrow. This is an unforgettable sensory experience in twenty-or-so dishes, paired with several bottles of natural wine. Once you’ve finished eating, end your evening cosying up by the fireplace in the restaurant’s private hideaway bar with a glass of wine (or three).

James Edward Henry and Shaun Kelly escaped to the countryside in the renovated outbuildings of a chateau in Essonne to create an exquisite restaurant in a beautiful setting. The delicate dishes include veal steak – perfectly grilled on the wood fire – with sides to share around the table, like purslane and grilled green beans and cabbage salad. The kitchen garden provides most of the vegetables and herbs, and small local farms supply the meat. The setting will make sure your soul feels just as nourished.

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Le Servan
  • Restaurants
  • Bistros
  • Roquette
  • price 3 of 4

The Levha sisters, Katia and Tatiana, have been lighting up their corner spot on Rue Saint-Maur since 2014. The setting is drop-dead gorgeous: ceiling mouldings, a vintage fresco, and a bouquet of flowers on the massive brass bar. The cuisine, which hops freely between France and Asia, is boldly innovative and very now: check out the grilled sweetbreads boosted by phrik phao (spicy Thai sauce). Oh, and the carefully selected wines are grea too, heavy on Burgundy reds and whites.

Clamato
  • Restaurants
  • Seafood
  • Charonne
  • price 3 of 4

At the helm of this cool bar mixing wood, glass, concrete, and steel, Bertrand Grébaut (of Septime) is your captain on a voyage of seafood. The menu changes based on the day's catch (which is always sustainably sourced). The delicious dishes include spicy Oléron cuttlefish and mullet ceviche with butternut squash. Just watch out: the bill can rise as quickly as the tide. And that’s quick.

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Giovanni Passerini has got to be the best Italian chefs in Paris. Hell, we reckon he's one of the top chefs in the city full stop. His modern trattoria is a beaut with a terrazzo floor, white walls, and sleek light fixtures. The menu is a perfect balance of classic Italian comfort food (think duck ragu tagliatelle and ricotta-spinach ravioli with sage butter) and insanely good gourmet dishes, like the two-course pigeon, which might just have you dreaming about it for weeks after you've paid the (admittedly steep) bill.

  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Roquette
  • price 2 of 4

Septime hasn't aged a bit since it opened in 2011. This is fine dining in a London pub-type setting; think weathered wood tables, blackened steel and dim lighting. Another thing that hasn’t changed? Bertrand Grébaut's Michelin-starred cuisine, which remains fresh, innovative and delicious (and features a seven-course menu that knows how to build up to a crescendo). It changes every three weeks, but previous highlights include little gem with a micro-thin slice of bacon, pearly scallops paired with bone marrow, and an incredible grilled sweetbread and harissa dish served with a couscous broth. To fully appreciate these dishes, the expertly curated wine pairings are practically a must. Trust us.

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Looking for a starched-tablecloth meal with genteel service and some friendly vegetarian options? Yeah, this isn’t the place. At this Parisian market counter, you eat standing up in the open air (it does get chilly in winter), with jovial Michael Grosman as your endearing host and sommelier. He was named the ‘Best Host in Paris’ at the Time Out Food and Drink Awards (we like him). The bold and meaty plates from Japanese chef Shunta Suzuki are just as satisfying as they are pricey, from the charcuterie offerings to the iconic Groix mussels in a gorgonzola sauce.

A typical 8th district brasserie setting, Le Mermoz looks like something out of the 60s, with bistro-style furniture, a mosaic floor and opaline chandeliers. Its impeccable contemporary cuisine is the brainchild of the gifted Californian chef Thomas Graham and his brilliant team (awarded a prize at the Time Out Paris Food and Drink Awards!). Think mackerel nestled in a zucchini flower, roasted lamb medallions with chanterelle mushrooms and wild blueberries, and samphire risotto with sheep's milk yoghurt. The wine list, curated by Robin Gurgui, is in perfect harmony with these exceptional dishes, featuring a load of natural wines. It's a feast of creativity, skill, pure joy and deliciousness.

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Opaline lighting, a marbled counter, and basket-woven service... Châteaubriand invented the codes of bistronomy in 2006 and has been breaking boundaries ever since. From its kitchen, the iconic chef Iñaki Aizpitarte always strays from the mainstream. It's a true author's cuisine; vibrant, energetic, and almost punk. Sometimes you miss the mark a bit, sometimes it hits the bull's-eye. But however it turns out, everything he sends out is innovative, fresh and exciting.

Les Arlots
  • Restaurants
  • Bistros
  • SoPi (South Pigalle)
  • price 2 of 4

This bistro may have officially opened in 2016 and not cost much, but it has an old soul. It sort of feels like the kind of place where figures from history have sat, and where your favourite author may have enjoyed some snails back in the 80s. Of course, Les Alorts serves its iconic sausage and mash, unbeatable at the top of the bistro pantheon, but everything else on the menu is finely crafted and perfectly executed. Take our word for it: this is the best bistro in Paris.

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  • Restaurants
  • Diners
  • Charonne
  • price 2 of 4

At first glance, Mokonuts appears to be a modest coffee shop, where you can unexpectedly enjoy a top-notch cookie baked by the brilliant Japanese firefly Moko Hirayama. And you certainly will, but you’ll also probably have the best lunch of your life if you’re lucky enough to grab a spot. Mokonuts’ Franco-Lebanese head chef Omar Koreitem creates dishes that will blow your mind, from scallops crudo to cavatelli and cuttlefish puttanesca. Mokonuts is one of our most beloved restaurants at Time Out, year after year.

This timeless Parisian bistro setting is hiding something special. You might think it’s all just steak and fries, but you’ll be blown away by the beautifully crafted plates of the Japanese chef Masaki Nagao (formerly of Clarence) with his crispy sardine tempura and pearly hake drizzled in chorizo sauce. The experience wouldn't be complete without sommelier Marco Pelletier (formerly of Bristol), who manages the small room and one of the most beautiful wine cellars in Paris with some extremely rare bottles. To top it off? The prices are still reasonable. Folie-Méricourt is immune to inflation.

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Eels
  • Restaurants
  • Bistros
  • Poissonnière
  • price 3 of 4

Chef Adrien Ferrand cuts through the noise of the Parisian restaurant scene by doing things a little differently. Eels is a cosy little bistro in Poissonnière, where every single dish is crafted with impeccable technique. Plates here are presented beautifully with precise little touches, like the raw scallops with turnip ravioli, or the guinea fowl with grilled cuttlefish, green beans and padrón peppers. There’s no trickery here; Eels is just a great restaurant.

Dark wood bistro furniture, 19th-century bourgeois paintings and Belle Epoque tiling make this dream of a Parisian tavern what it is, nestled away in the Passage des Panoramas. Sardinian chef Simone Tondo cooks from an open kitchen so you can watch the action unfold, and the food is proper Italian grub. Think old, reassuring Italian classics, passed down from Tondo’s nonna. Simple, delicious. Just watch that bill – Racines is pricey.

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  • Restaurants
  • Moroccan
  • Folie-Méricourt
  • price 3 of 4

Le Tagine gets its character from openwork lanterns, zelliges and pleated fabrics on the ceiling. The radiant owner Marie-Josée Mimoun sources the crème de la crème of products to cook some seriously good food, including literally the best couscous in the world – yes, we went there – with spices from Thiercelin, suckling lamb from the Pyrenees and olive oil from a local store. Plus Mimoun was one of the first to switch to an all-natural wine list (a win in our books). 

Okay, so the name sounds a little scary, but trust us, this place is actually chill AF. Opened by the French-Brazilian couple Ninon Lecomte and Lucas Baur de Campos, the service here is friendly AF, and the setting insanely cosy. The dishes are definitely meaty but still delicate, like the cloud-like mashed potato crowned with bone marrow, served with perhaps the softest and most tender flame-grilled rib you’ve ever tasted. And if you’re lucky enough to visit on a Sunday, it would be a crime not to order the roast chicken.

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In charge of this tiny tiled galley is Olive Davoux, a Belgian-Ugandan who used to work at L'Ecailler du Bistrot, and who delights diners with a menu of small plates inspired by the day's (artisanal) catch. Dive in headfirst to taste the likes of black mullet ceviche and Basque country lean carpaccio, and don't forget the well-shucked oyster baskets (Monsieur Jean-Paul's Utah Beach and Cadoret family's specials). Unreal.

While we continue to mourn the closure of the beloved Abri by chef Katsuaki Okiyama, we find solace in his second location, an izakaya dedicated to soba noodles in the beautiful Montmartre. The decor is all wooden walls and concrete floors, and the noodles will blow you away. The buckwheat noodles are to be slurped in a hot or cold broth, and are undoubtedly the best soba noodles in Paris. In the evenings, there are some sharp additions to the menu: clams cooked in sake steam, pork roll salad with miso, and the legendary karaage chicken. Extra kudos are awarded for the short but well-thought-out wine list.

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This old-school horse butcher shop – with its chicken tile, stainless steel hooks, and golden horse head  hides the best sandwich shop in Paris. Here you’ll find around 20 enticing options in small plastic baskets (€5-8.50) on the mini marble counter; highlights include classics like the Prince de Paris ham and the original chicken pot-au-feu (meat and veg) with dill and mayo, as well as veggie options like the butternut squash, tapenade and feta.

  • Restaurants
  • Haute cuisine
  • Folie-Méricourt
  • price 3 of 4

The chefs at Le Dauphin experiment with creative tapas in a modern and clean-looking space, full of glass and Carrara marble. The restaurant was designed by legendary architect Rem Koolhaas, and its now the kind of place where fashionable people snack on small plates and snap Instagram pics, but in a good way. The dishes are focused on high-quality ingredients in their purest form, like mussels marinières and the trademark sea snails, served with a little jar of mayo. Heads up: at lunchtime, Le Dauphin has a special set menu for €20, and it's great.

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Café du Coin is a charming, old-fashioned bistro, complete with brass-rimmed counter, formica tables, and belle époque cement tiles. And while it might have a name as common as they come for a French dive bar, you’d be foolish to dismiss it. Created by chef Florent Ciccoli (previously of Jones, Cheval d'Or, and Recoin), this neighborhood watering hole in the 11th arrondissement is buzzing from morning coffee to dinner time. Our recommendation? Their affordable lunch menu, featuring irresistible bistro plates like the Mont d'Or cheese cordon bleu. And for drinks, Café du Coin has got you covered with plenty of natural wines to choose from and small pizzettes to munch on. It’s our go-to spot.

This place is more Parisian than the Eiffel Tower – old zinc bar, Formica tables and globe lights – providing the perfect backdrop for some refined bistronomy. Chef Christopher Edwards delivers a bold, daring and flavorful cuisine. And to complement these impressive dishes, the brilliant propriétaire Daniela Lavadenz has curated one of the city's finest wine lists.

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Since 2015, the Tuscan chef Michele Farnesi – who worked at legendary Paris restaurants Rino and Heimat – has been making his mark in the quirky dining room of this small address in Ménilmontant, which is more like an osteria than a palace. The five-course meal takes diners on a lively journey through the Italian terroirs with precise and spirited cooking. Highlights include the Venetian-style pasta and the opaline mullet with hollandaise sauce and sea urchin (and of course the all-Italian wine list).

Grande Brasserie was brought back to life in 2022 by director Adrien Spanu – and elected the same year as Paris’s best restaurant at the Time Out Paris Food and Drink Awards. Spanu was on a mission to restore the heritage of this Parisian landmark, which shows in the decor: '20s mosaics, post-war frescoes, and starched tablecloths. This all makes for a cosy space to enjoy the timeless cuisine from chef Grégoire Simon. Make sure to try his world-class deviled eggs (at a high price).

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Get stuck into small plates and big glasses (the wine list is as thick as a summer novel) at number 6 on the well-polished Rue du Nil, our favourite address from French chef Grégory Marchand (Frenchie, Frenchie to Go). The venue is small – you'll be elbow to elbow with the mostly English-speaking clientele – but worth it for the scotch eggs and kimchi aioli, veal sweetbread nuggets and salsify tagliatelle with yellow wine slalom. Plus, it's the perfect spot to come alone, as you'll no doubt end up chatting with everyone at the bar.

  • Restaurants
  • Haute cuisine
  • Rennes-Sèvres
  • price 4 of 4

Antonin Bonnet, the talented and reserved chef from Cévennes, is impervious to trends. He focuses instead on high-quality ingredients, and serves up his outstanding dishes in the rather minimal dining room here at Quinsou. It's expensive, but worth every cent. Try the lobster with pickled beets, Vendée monkfish with sake, or veal sweetbreads from Anne-Laure Jolivet's farm with black truffle cream. It's pure talent on a plate.

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Founded all the way back in 1890, this old-school establishment fell into the hands of pioneering, always-lively chef Alain Ducasse at the beginning of this century. These days it still ticks all the boxes of a Balzac-era brasserie, full of mirrors, sculptures, opals and floral pottery. The kitchen is exotically traditional: chicken liver cake, veal blanquette, sweetbreads and brains, trout and fermented cabbage. Yum. 

Behind a deep red storefront lies La Maquis: a sleek, minimalist, deeply fashionable food spot, its chairs, tables and benches slotting perfectly into a snug space. From this unassuming base, two chefs formerly of brasserie institution Le Châteaubriand have launched a culinary offensive that has conquered the surrounding neighbourhood. The affordable lunch menu features only bombshell plates that combine disarming simplicity and watchmaker precision.

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After top-notch culinary science? Few places do it better than Batignolles. A few steps from Saint-Lazare station, Marc Cordonnier (formerly of art-food hub Ze Kitchen Galerie) and super sommelier Louis Langevin have taken up residence in a discreet, stylish white address. The market-inspired menu leans heavily towards Asia (like the hake with Paimpol beans and Thai broth) and changes almost daily, but balance and creativity are always on point. And they've got the best natural wine list in the neighbourhood.

Just a few strides away from the crowds of the Place de la Contrescarpe, Japanese chef Kazuma Chikuda serves up his delicate cuisine in a haven of tasteful kilim armchairs. Mind-blowing leek tartlet, Granny Smith gel and cabbage-stuffed veg with yellow wine emulsion... The menu changes all the time, but the delight stays the same. Whether it's for lunch or dinner, on weekdays or on Sundays, it’s always time for Narro.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Tapas bars
  • Saint-Germain-des-Prés
  • price 3 of 4

An izakaya with the luxurious twists and flair one would expect of celeb chef Cyril Lignac, Le Bar des Prés has chic marble tables, trendy wicker lighting and plush peacock banquettes. Here you can indulge in Japanese cuisine with a hint of southern France. Try their scrumptious crab meat and avocado galette with a Madras curry kick, or maybe splurge on the pricey but perfectly executed marinated sea urchins and sushi. And, while you’re at it, don't forget to quench your thirst with one of the expertly crafted cocktails.

  • 4 out of 5 stars

The premier outpost of Roman-style pizza (which boasts a thinner crust than its Neapolitan cousin) in Paris also has plenty of style. With its bar made of white bricks, bare walls, mirrored ceiling and trendy servers, the finest dishes are the delightfully simple margherita (made with buffalo mozzarella, tomato, and basil) and parma rossa (22-month aged Parma ham, buffalo mozzarella, tomato and basil). And from noon to 1pm, Tuesday to Friday, they're sold at affordable prices (from €6 to €10).

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  • 4 out of 5 stars

With its ceiling featuring century-old Circassian ceramics, this venerable bistro was once the canteen of the neighbouring Cirque d’Hiver’s acrobats. These days it delivers exciting cuisine that is without pretence and very much in its own lane. Korean chef Jung Yonghoon delights his audiences with a balancing act of small plates, supported by one of the most beautiful natural wine lists in all of Paris.

Just a couple of strides from the Paul-Bert market, tiled bistro Bonne Aventure stands out as one of the area’s best lunch spots. On flea market days, the chalkboard menu offers comforting dishes such as stuffed cabbage or sausage and mash. Wash it down with some sulphite-free wine before heading back to the flea market. In the evening, the menu shifts to punchy tapas. In short, no matter what time it is, Bonne Aventure is a treat.

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  • 5 out of 5 stars

A big advocate of retro gastronomy, restauranteur Édouard Vermynck has transformed the site of the old Gaspard de la Nuit into something from a hundred years ago. Adorned with vintage framed photos, antique mirrors and a hand-painted sign on the storefront, the menu keeps the theme with timeless, household French dishes. Artisanal andouillette with a bushel of excellent matchstick fries, roast chicken with fluffy mashed potatoes, cordon-bleu with fries... nostalgia has never tasted so good.

  • 5 out of 5 stars

An exceptionally cool, icy blue retro joint, Le Cadoret rules its corner of Belleville from the first morning croissant all the way to the last post-dinner digestif. Chef Léa Fleuriot serves up old-school dishes, sometimes with a twist of herbs, condiments or spices, like the pot-au-feu made with tender beef paleron and fermented soy paste sauce. As for Louis-Marie, the man behind the bottles, he uncorks carefully selected natural wines and sakes.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars

Loïc Minel and Christophe Juville are back with a flatshare vibe in Lolo Bistrot, a London-style restaurant just a few pedals away from their main spot, Lolo Cave à Manger. Around a massive heater and flashy neon sign, tuck into spicy tapas like scotch egg merguez-vermouth, temaki with scallops and horseradish and agnolotti with wild garlic. This gastronomy is wild in its inspiration, unyielding in its intentions, and artistic in its plating. And for the wine, trust Lolo to find some bottles you haven't had yet!

  • 4 out of 5 stars

The five-strong crew who run Pantobaguette know how to both party hard and serve up some delicious grub. In a funky and festive space, Antonin Girard (who trained at snug, alfresco eatery Lolo) dishes out crazily good Japanese-inspired plates. We're talking marinated egg with wasabi mayo, extra-large mussels with peppers, and even CBD-infused cookies. To wash it all down, they've got a great selection of natural wines in white, orange and red – plus treats for your ears from the resident DJ.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars

In a high-ceilinged room with a domino counter and neon dragon, the Levha sisters – Tatiana and Katia – blend their Filipino roots with global influences in sharp, precise and unexpected ways. Try the fried bao filled with Comté cheese and dipped in XO mayo or the South American-infused clams in fiery chipotle and chilli broth. This unique, quirky and endearing spot is also staffed by an ultra-friendly team and boasts a soundtrack with a penchant for turn-of-the-century hip-hop.

  • 5 out of 5 stars

The döner kebab's honour is restored! At Ozlem, you won’t find frozen fries or sketchy meat. The team at this Turkish canteen work tirelessly to prepare the ultimate kebab, using a mix of veal and turkey that marinates for hours before being skewered and grilled. It's served in a homemade dürüm (wheat wrap) filled with sliced red onions, a touch of sumac, and parsley. Crispy, tender and perfectly seasoned, this kebab’s an absolute killer.

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  • 5 out of 5 stars

Don't be fooled by its DIY-esque panelling and bulky AC unit: this Japanese canteen is a real treasure trove in Little Tokyo. It's neither stuffy and ceremonial nor a run-of-the-mill beef-and-cheese yakitori joint, but rather a perfect blend of elegance and spontaneity. The star of this place? Chef Toyofumi Ōzuru, who serves up sea urchin or langoustine sushi, creamy miso eggplants and amberjack carpaccio. The journey ends with a seriously sumptuous sake menu.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Restaurants
  • Turkish
  • Le Marais

Just a stone’s throw away from the Rue des Rosiers, this spot is the brainchild of Tel Aviv superstar chef Eyal Shani. It's got a charmingly chaotic vibe, with an open kitchen, blaring music and vegetables hanging from the counter. Even the massive blackboard on the wall lists the menu in a disorderly fashion. Here you'll find top-notch pitas (with chicken that's crispy on the outside and juicy on the inside, ultra-tender lamb-beef meatballs, and comforting ratatouille) accompanied by the legendary grilled cauliflower. It's simple, funky and definitely worth a visit.

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  • 5 out of 5 stars

Thomas Chisholm, who appeared on French TV cooking competition Top Chef and also worked at A.T., has settled in this elegant restaurant with long communal tables, an open kitchen and pendant lights. The French-American chef doesn't skimp on luxury in his tapas. Marinating, grilling, smoking... the recipes use a variety of techniques and textures without being showy. As a result, you’ll joyfully mop up every last drop.

  • 4 out of 5 stars

Schoolfriends Marie-Anna Delgado (in the kitchen) and Olivia Brunet (on decor and service) have set up this lovely canteen where seemingly all of Belleville is a regular. They've got a magic lunch deal with plates that'll transport you to a road trip through the Landes on your way back from Catalonia. Add in wild tapas nights and Sunday bingo, and you’ll leave singing Paloma’s praises.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars

In this tiny, well-decked-out ramen spot (with a counter made of cinder blocks and manga shelves embedded in the wall), get ready to slurp some wonderful homemade noodles. It’s amongst the very best Japanese eateries in Sainte-Anne, where’s there's quite the competition. Those noodles frolic in a bowl of succulent chicken and pork broth, pimped up with dried seaweed, a runny nitamago egg and thin, tender chāshū pork slices. Itadakimasu!

  • 5 out of 5 stars

If you’re in Saint-Ambroise, Recoin is an essential stop. This attractive joint – designed by Florent Ciccoli with light wood, white walls and a blue-tiled floor like a swimming pool – will welcome you whether it’s your first coffee of the morning or last calvados of the night. Finnish chef Marlo Snellman cooks up a fresh and straightforward bistro menu – think pork loin and grilled eggplant, followed by absinthe baba – best enjoyed with Recoin’s highly drinkable wines.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars

Skylights, polished concrete floors, an indoor garden, terracotta walls, a huge wooden table and Nordic furniture make this room stunning. From the open kitchen, chef Sylvain Parisot creates hyper-local and seasonal bistro-style dishes that are seriously delicious. And it's no wonder, with his partners Eric Delbart and Dan Humphris owning Humphris grocery store and the Heurteloup organic farm. At €35, the lunch menu is a real treat and has already won over all the locals – and in the evenings, it gets even more upscale.

  • 5 out of 5 stars

Magma's khaki green facade, puffy banquettes and dark granite bar give off dandy bistro vibes. And that sense of cool extends to the kitchen, where chef Ryuya Ono – formerly of Michelin-starred restaurant Bruno Verjus – sends out plates that are as Instagram-worthy as they are delicious. Guinea fowl with sliced fennel and smoked eel sauce, whole pigeon with sweet pepper, bay leaf ice cream... it’s all best enjoyed with a well-chosen natural wine.

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  • 5 out of 5 stars

This postage stamp-sized Chinese joint sets taste buds on fire with its spicy Sichuan broths. The menu is concise: wheat or rice vermicelli noodle soups loaded with meat, or homemade dumplings with silky fillings. You can adjust the spiciness level from zero to three, and there's no need for false pride – even level one is a scorcher.

  • 4 out of 5 stars

Even though Wolfgang Staudinger only took over Café Content in May 2022, it feels like it’s been around forever. This bright little bistro, with art deco lettering, a mirrored ceiling, tulip chandeliers and vintage furniture, sees Staudinger team up with chef Etienne Hervé (who also worked at the now-closed Café Constant – hence the name). Together they serve up an impeccable set-menu lunch for €22, where classic bistro dishes are given a twist with natural wines. No pretence here, just pure satisfaction.

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