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Iliyas Ong

Iliyas Ong

Articles (21)

The best supper spots in Singapore for late-night dining

The best supper spots in Singapore for late-night dining

Some calls can't go unanswered – we’re talking about those late-night stomach growls that you can’t shake off with a protein bar or fruit. Well, well, if you're living in Singapore, one thing's for sure. You'll never go hungry at any time of the day, whether it's 4pm or 4am. For something more substantial (and delicious), saunter down to these 24-hour joints and restaurants that open till late for some post-OT or just a dirty supper with friends. There's nothing worse than going to bed hangry and unsatisfied. RECOMMENDED: Guide to Singapore after dark and the best late-night massage parlours in Singapore

The best whisky bars in Singapore

The best whisky bars in Singapore

For those of us who aren't Harvey Specter from Suits with a bottle of Macallan at our desks, turn to the city's top whisky bars for an after-work tipple. Whether you're a fan of smoky and peaty Scotch or sweet and oaky bourbons, these leather-chair saloons have all your dram dreams covered. Visit The Exciseman Whisky Bar for limited edition bottles of Scotch or stick with the ever-reliable La Maison Du Whisky, which stocks a wide variety of bottles from around the world. Whatever your pick, these bars are the places to be for some sipping and savouring. RECOMMENDED The best gin bars in Singapore and the best bars for an Old Fashioned in Singapore

The ultimate guide to Tai Seng

The ultimate guide to Tai Seng

Once a vibrant kampung area rife with gang wars, Tai Seng has cleaned up pretty well. The place takes its name from Tai Seng Rubber Factory which was constructed in the area in 1917. Although it is known for being a dusty industrial estate, Tai Seng now shines with cafés, shops and even an art gallery. Make a trip down to this neighbourhood for venerable char siew, go crate-digging and shop for vintage furniture. Read our guide to discover the things to do while you're in the 'hood. RECOMMENDED: Ultimate guide to Singapore's neighbourhood

The best specialist bars in Singapore

The best specialist bars in Singapore

If you’re one to choose your bars based on your poison of choice, rejoice at these joints dedicated to fulfilling your one-track minded fantasies regarding a dedicated spirit. From American whiskey to Korean makgeolli, there's a place in town for whatever you feel like downing.  RECOMMENDED: The 50 best bars in Singapore and the best natural wine bars in Singapore  

Best bars in Singapore to watch Euro 2016 live

Best bars in Singapore to watch Euro 2016 live

There are few things better than catching live football in the company of friends. And beer. Definitely beer. But when the couch at home doesn’t cut it, you’ll want to check into these bars and pubs that are screening the Euro 2016 tournament.

Interview: Paloma Faith

Interview: Paloma Faith

It’s a few hours before her headlining set at London’s Kew the Music festival, and Paloma Faith hardly looks the part. She’s dressed in a hoodie, has no makeup on, and her tresses are tangled in a half-hearted bun. This is not the British sensation we’re used to seeing light up stages with her fiery blue-eyed soul. And that’s awesome.The 34-year-old has made a name for herself as a new-school diva whose quirky costumes and stage antics belie her salt-of-the-earth charm. It’s no act. Faith is warm, chatty and off-the-cuff in person, never mind the fact that she has three acclaimed albums and was named the British Female Solo Artist of the Year at the Brit Awards 2015.‘I don’t see myself as a role model, but I’m aware that my actions will affect people,’ Faith says. ‘Sometimes I worry and think, “Oh no, I shouldn’t have done or said that.” But, y’know, everyone’s fallible.’ Pop stars, take note.Like the Nina Simones and Bob Dylans of the world, Faith wants her art to catalyse change. Problem is, music is no longer the reckoning force it once was. ‘It shows how conservative [we’ve become],’ she sighs. ‘People aren’t very brave in that sense anymore.’As though to hammer home the point, Faith thrusts a magazine at us. A harrumphing Kanye West is on the cover. ‘Look at this,’ she begins. ‘It says, “Kanye: punk, provocateur, activist.” I think if Kanye’s a punk, provocateur, activist, we’re in trouble. He’s promoting a bad attitude – I just find him a bit grumpy. I look at the peopl

Listings and reviews (11)

Summerlong

Summerlong

3 out of 5 stars

In the expat haven of Robertson Quay, where boozy weeknights tumble into lazy weekends, a restaurant built on ‘chill beachside vibes’ seems obligatory. And with this Mediterranean-leaning small plates joint from the folks behind Neon Pigeon, the neighbourhood finally gets what it deserves – never mind that it’s miles from sea. The decor checks off all the boxes you’d expect: it’s open-air, sunlight-drenched and with enough rattan, bamboo, and burlap to be mistaken for a BritishIndia outlet. Located on the banks of the Singapore River, the space is designed for whiling away hours in. Which, given the well-executed dishes, won’t be a problem. Ordering the char-grilled octopus ($19) is a no-brainer. Summerlong’s version is smoky, slick with honey, and paired with thick parsnip chips that resemble the seafood in both appearance and sweetness. The black cod ($25) is another standout: perfectly pan-fried, with fried capers and Tuscan kale that add crunch to the dish. Not all the seafood works, though. A petite bowl of steamed mussels ($21), swimming in a spicy broth alongside crumbles of lamb sausage, is too clumsy to justify its price tag. And that, unfortunately, sums up Summerlong. Here’s a solid, easygoing restaurant whose dishes are good, but not spectacular enough to warrant a return visit.  Time Out Singapore reviews anonymously and pays for all meals. Read our restaurant review policy here. What the stars mean:★ Poor ★ ★ Promising ★★★ Good ★★★★ Very good ★★★★★ Exceptional 

Crackerjack

Crackerjack

5 out of 5 stars

Crackerjack is not your average local cocktail bar. It isn’t hidden behind cloaks of curtains, doesn’t have an ampersand in its name, and you don’t need a damn password to get in. Instead, the all-day restaurant and bar is drenched in natural light, and long tables encourage communal dining. There’s even a shuffleboard table on one end of the space. But best of all are the bartenders: they’re as casual and unpretentious as the dude in your local pouring you a pint of lager. Except they aren’t. They’re there to shake up solid drinks that don’t try too hard to be different. The 20 or so cocktails ($16-$20) come from the minds of Peter Chua and Zachary de Git; the former worked at 28 HongKong Street while the latter’s known for his time behind Tippling Club’s bar. Split into no-nonsense categories such as ‘Shaken’ and ‘Stirred’, the drinks menu is beautifully concise. Because everything we sip on, as the name of one LEGO Movie-inspired tipple proclaims, is awesome. I begin what would eventually spiral into a long night with a mezcal Negroni. It’s one of the best I’ve had in the city, alternatingly bitter and sweet with the brightness of orange punching through. The Ballgame is more complex, with rye, cinnamon bitters and caramel corn thrown somewhere in the mix, and served with a short glass of beer. Follow a sip from one with a glug from the other and the contrasting notes will hit home runs on your palate. The food isn’t to be outdone, either. Crackerjack takes inspiration fro

PIM PAM by FOC

PIM PAM by FOC

3 out of 5 stars

If Hong Kong street’s FOC is the insouciant hipster of the family, consider PIM PAM the friendlier, more eager-to-please sibling. The latest off-shoot of the CBD restaurant seats hundreds, is right on Orchard Road and swaps the buzzy open kitchen vibe of the flagship for a fast-casual, all-day dining format. But that doesn’t mean the food suffers.  The self-styled ‘gastro-bodega’ takes the modern Catalan slant of the original and condenses it down to dishes that are more familiar (and affordable) to the local palate – read: less tweezer-tweaked food and more hearty plates for sharing. The Iberico pork presa ($30) is a thing of beauty. A sliced slab of meaty heaven, cooked pink and served with black garlic purée, is robust and punches hard with gamey porcine flavours. But a special of beef shortrib ($28) is too stodgy, one-note and gelatinous. Of course, there’s tapas. The croquetas ($2-$2.50) – take your pick from jamon, mushroom, crab, and spinach and pine nuts – curiously arrive as spheres, and you won’t stop at just one. Save room for the pork and cuttlefish meatballs ($12), too. They’re luscious, smothered in an earthy gravy and downright delicious. There’s a section of the menu carved out just for sandwiches ($10-$18), but the housemade loaves leave a lot to be desired – a cracking crust and insides that don’t have the texture of sponge cake among them.  With Dario Knox as the mastermind behind the bottled cocktails on the menu, expectations are high. Yet while my Sherry

Good Luck Beerhouse

Good Luck Beerhouse

3 out of 5 stars

Let’s get the basics out of the way: this is a no-frills craft beer bar along Haji Lane that’s dark, dingy and about the size of a janitor’s storeroom. In other words, it’s a great spot to while away hours. Come evening, there are tables set up on the narrow street, so you’ll be able to quaff al fresco if that’s your thing.  Opened late last year, Good Luck Beerhouse replaced Koi on the first level of a shophouse along Haji Lane. It’s set up by the same folks behind Shin Gi Tai, a cocktail joint hidden on the floor above it, but don’t come expecting a bowtied bartender whisking up fancy negronis in classy digs. You’re here because you’re a beer fiend. Or you’re in the area and are in desperate need of a cold one. On typical nights, you’ll have eight beers on draft with which to acquaint yourself. On my visit, the taps repped the US (Stone Brewing), New Zealand (Zeffer Cider) and Singapore (Innocence Brewing and Crossroads Brewing), with styles ranging from IPAs to wheat beers to the more esoteric sour ales. Curiously, most suds are only sold by the pint ($15-$18), with half pours only available, according to the beer-tender, for brews ‘with high ABV’.  Bottled beers ($12-$18) include labels like Yeastie Boys, 8 Wired Brewing, Founders Brewing, Orval and Anderson Valley that, given Singapore’s taking to craft beer, won’t sound too exotic to the experienced guzzler. But given a neon sign above the bar that reads ‘liang cha’, I ask about plans on stocking hyped-up Asian craft po

Roxy Laksa

Roxy Laksa

It’ll be a sad day when laksa – the legit ones – becomes an endangered species. Or char kway teow, prawn mee, bak chor mee and all those dishes we grew up on. But when was the last time you saw a 20-something fry up some killer orh lua? The reality is: many old hawkers are retiring without a successor in sight. And the thought of having no young hawker stall owners keeping kopitiam cuisine alive scares Willin Low. So the chef-owner of Wild Rocket is partnering chef Michael Lim, the grandson of the Roxy Laksa founder, to create a hawker stall ‘model’ that fresh-faced entrepreneurs can replicate – it’s part business plan, part service design, part operations nitty-gritty. ‘The inspiration behind Wild Rocket is Singapore’s hawker fare,’ says Low. ‘If we do not preserve it, we will lose everything.’ Currently, Low and Lim are test-bedding the concept with a Roxy Laksa stall at Timbre+. While it’s early days yet, the stall is experimenting with technology to reduce manpower costs and lower the barrier to entry without compromising the quality of the dish. One way they’re doing so is to develop ‘food processing stations’ that save the hawkers time and money. The two chefs are also working together to create a laksa paste, cooked up in a central kitchen, that will be available to the public – unfortunately the launch date for this has yet to be confirmed. And Low isn’t stopping at the Peranakan noodle soup. He’s creating chilled versions of hawker favourites, beginning with nasi lem

The Coconut Club

The Coconut Club

3 out of 5 stars

What Wanton did to wonton mee, The Coconut Club is doing to nasi lemak: taking the hawker staple up a notch and serving it in air-conditioned, design-savvy digs in the CBD. But wait, you’ll probably ask, why should I pay $12.80 for a plate of nasi lemak when I can tapow one for three bucks from the nearby Amoy Food Centre? When it tastes as good as the one your grandma used to make, hey – that’s reason enough. And as someone of Malay descent who grew up on the dish, I’ve to confess The Coconut Club’s take on it is legit. It’s not done in the ‘Chinese’ style – which is essentially cai fan with an assortment of fried snacks heaped onto your rice – and neither does it resemble those pyramids of banana leaves, within which an anorexic ikan kuning is all the protein you’ll get. No, The Coconut Club’s version is the kind that a relative will slave over for a home-cooked feast. So expect less a mind-blowing twist on the classic than a straight-up, yet almost faultless, example of it. Which means the nasi lemak comes with all the trimmings: a fried egg, ikan bilis, peanuts, cucumber, fried chicken and, of course, sambal. The restaurant sources coconuts from a single plantation in Sabak Bernam, Malaysia, to use in its dishes, although the rice, as fragrant as it is, could do with more lemak. The chicken thigh is coated in a turmeric-, lemongrass- and cumin-heavy rempah before hitting the fryer, and is way juicier and more tender than the ones at your kopitiam stall. The sambal isn’t t

The Pump Room

The Pump Room

The clubby and touristy vibes of Clarke Quay might not seem ideal for a microbrewery, but The Pump Room’s ten years of existence will prove all you naysayers wrong. Granted, you’ll have to muscle your way through crowds and particularly daft servers, but the beer at the end of it is worth the hassle. If you’d rather avoid that area, the bar has an outlet in Great World City, too. Thanks to massive 3,000-litre tanks, five beers ($10.50-$16.50) are available all year round and poured straight from those vats. The Pump Room Lager is the best-seller, and it’s easy to see why: it’s the most approachable drink on this list. Our favourite, however, has to be the Golden Ale, a fruity, summery brew that bursts with subtle raisin notes. We hate to say this, but avoid the food – everything from Tomahawk steaks ($108) to duck confit ($32) – at all costs. It’s simply not worth the pretty penny.

Hashida Sushi

Hashida Sushi

Step into the ryokan-inspired interiors of the refurbished Hashida Sushi Singapore and you might feel a little intimidated. But don’t be. Because Chef Kenjiro ‘Hatch’ Hashida is no stern shokuhin – he’s more likely to crack a joke as he moulds a flawless piece of nigiri before you. The sushi joint, now expanded to seat 35 across three dining rooms, offers sterling Edomae-style sushi alongside modern interpretations of traditional Japanese dishes. And, yes, it’s omakase only: lunch ranges from $80 to $250 while dinner will set you back $350 or $500. As is expected of a joint of this calibre, the seafood – delivered from Tsukiji almost on a daily basis – is impeccable. (It probably helps that Hashida’s father helms a sushi bar near the famous fish market.) Highlights of the nigiri include the Botan ebi, aged for two days and given a spritz of housemade shoyu, lightly seared bonito, and the house signature: sheets of fatty otoro, wrapped around rice, that dissolve on the palate. You’ll be smacking your lips well after you’re done with it. The other dishes served as part of the dinner omakase straddle tradition and invention. A sashimi platter – ours has halibut, snapper, chutoro and a kind of octopus called mizu tako – comes with a variety of condiments. Sudachi juice and smoked salt are perhaps the more recognisable ones, but then you have a splash of tea oil, which adds a subtle earthiness to the seafood. And in our dipping bowls, the chefs mix their housemade shoyu with iriza

Shoukouwa Sushi Restaurant

Shoukouwa Sushi Restaurant

3 out of 5 stars

There comes a point in fine sushi dining, usually about $150 in, at which the minutae of the meal – its craft, ingredients, flavours and textures – are lost on the average, Itacho-going diner. So when we say this eight-seater sushi bar (a separate private room seats six) in the One Fullerton enclave of high-end restaurants is pretty good, we mean it. But, likewise, when we say it isn’t worth its asking price, we mean it, too. A lunch at Shoukouwa starts at $150 for a 12-course nigiri sprint, bookended by an appetiser and a dessert. Dinner is more of a marathon: there are only two options – one $320 and the other $480 (gulp) – but they include cooked dishes, sashimi and 14 pieces of nigiri. The $320 set includes two sashimi courses or cooked dishes, while the $480 includes five of the same. Each lunch and dinner set also comes with miso soup and tamago. And as is the fashion for a restaurant of this calibre, everything’s omakase. With the most expensive meal clocking in at about the price of a return flight to Tokyo, you’d expect blow-your-mind levels of sushi, wrought from the wizened fingers of a shokuhin who picked up the art from a sixth-generation Sushi Buddha. Unfortunately, this isn’t quite the case. Yes, chef Masahiro Suzuki who prepared our lunch has 13 years of experience in the game. But when the sushi struggles to cross the first, most important hurdle, we leave the hinoki-toned bar wanting more. We’re talking, of course, about the rice. It’s the fundamental elemen

Full of Luck Club

Full of Luck Club

2 out of 5 stars

How do you like your dim sum? If you prefer somewhere loud, boisterous and authentic, look elsewhere. This modern Cantonese restaurant, opened by the folks behind Li Bai, offers that brashness only in its decor – think chinois chic plucked from the mind of Dick Lee’s hipster cousin – with none of the good food that you’d get from a down-and-dirty joint. A meal at Full of Luck Club is a novel experience let down by execution. And the steep prices certainly don’t help – ‘$7 for har gao?!’ one couple beside us exclaims in Cantonese (it’s actually $7.20). The dishes aren’t worth the pretty penny. The dim sum is thoroughly average: the radish cake with XO sauce ($6.80) is cold and sticky, and the fatty and unctuous steamed char siew bao ($5.40/three) isn’t half as good as Tim Ho Wan’s. At least the fancy baos ($6) – like a braised pork belly one with pickled lotus root – are complex and moreish. And then, the mains. Our truffle beef hor fun ($20) reeks with a chemical pong (whither thou, wok hei?), and our smoked duck claypot rice ($14) is straight-up bland. The sweet mint and lime cod, however, is crispy and succulent enough to have rescued the meal – except you’re paying $24 for four morsels of fish. We really like how fresh this restaurant and its ideas to modernise Cantonese fare are. Unfortunately, it needs much more than luck to make it work. Time Out Singapore reviews anonymously and pays for all meals. Read our restaurant review policy here. What the stars mean:★ Poor ★ ★

Aura

Aura

4 out of 5 stars

There's something about having dinner at a museum that raises your expectations. You imagine stubbornly traditional food, plated like works of art and whisked from the kitchen by bowtied waiters as Vivaldi swells around them. Not quite for Aura. The latest restaurant from Beppe de Vito is hardly as stuffy – although a stern word should be issued to its interior designer, whose idea of 'museum restaurant' seems to be plucked from the 'Nouveau Riche for Dummies' manual. No, it's all about the food here. Like de Vito's Osteria Art, Aura finds its niche in the rustic, stick-to-the-ribs fare of his Italian roots. But unlike that CBD restaurant, this one’s bold enough to tinker - just a little - with tradition. A trio of Hokkaido scallops with porcini ($38) appear as though they sit on a puttanesca sauce - it turns out to be puréed beetroot, sweet, moreish and, as a nod to its lookalike, lifted by capers. The bivalves are plump, juicy and with just the right amount of raw in the middle. This was the most complex dish we ordered. It was also the best. The pasta here is separated into two categories: homemade and 'artisanal', the latter of which our server sheepishly admits is bought. So we opted for one of the former, a pappardelle with oxtail and mushrooms ($26). This is comfort on a plate – tender, gelatinous meat tangoing with the al dente sheets. Who needs ladles of sauce when the oxtail dissolves on the tongue? Not all are hits, though. The recommended crispy frog legs ($25) ar

News (62)

In the September issue of Time Out Singapore: Singapore after dark

In the September issue of Time Out Singapore: Singapore after dark

Surviving on three hours of sleep used to be as easy as ordering the next pint. But now my body doth protest too much. Late nights are temptresses whose heavy price only grows the older I do. That said, if there’s a month worth the eye bags, hangovers and (let’s be honest now) MCs, it’s this one. As the Singapore Grand Prix zooms into town, so do the F1 after-parties. In fact, the whole city bursts into life – there’ll be comedy shows, late-night art exhibitions and, of course, supper spots to satisfy the midnight munchies. Get started on it, but don’t forget to grab a strong cup of coffee while you’re at it. Ever wondered what it's like to be a club bartender? Well, we spent the night at The Capital at Zouk in the (soggy) shoes of one and had a couple of spills and thrills.  We get decked out head-to-toe with the best accessories this month, too. From dainty pearl rings to custom jade jewellery to hand-braided leather bracelets, these pieces are beautifully crafted and made locally. So get to ready to rock some bling that's proudly Singapura.  Get the digital edition here, or subscribe to the magazine and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. 

In the August issue of Time Out Singapore: Bar trails in Singapore

In the August issue of Time Out Singapore: Bar trails in Singapore

      Bar hopping in Singapore is not for the faint of heart and light of wallet. Yet we do it anyway, because the cocktails are that good. Even along Orchard Road, hidden in hotels, behind mall façades and under ramen shops, bartenders shake up drinks far beyond your average G&T. We’ve stretched our legs and livers to present three pub crawls filled with award-winning lounges, laid-back watering holes and supper haunts for the post-booze munchies. Get started.                   And put down those deep fried chicken wings aside. For some serious nosh, like grilled cheese sandwiches and fish tacos, turn to these bars instead.        Break out of your fitness rut and spice up your regular gym routine with these quirky fitness classes. Train like a Jedi, anyone?       The Singapore Night Festival returns once again this month with plenty of light sculptures, interactive art installations and roving performances. We pick out the highlights you won't regret catching. Get the digital edition here, or subscribe to the magazine and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. 

In the July issue of Time Out Singapore: 'Go green' in Singapore

In the July issue of Time Out Singapore: 'Go green' in Singapore

From a bird's-eye view of Singapore, you’ll find the island draped in green. Parks, gardens and tree-ringed reservoirs are as common a sight as skyscrapers and highways – and the best way to explore them all is on a bike. We’ve charted three cycling routes around the eastern, western and central areas of the city that, thanks to the sprawling Park Connector Network, even rookie riders can hop on. So check them out and begin your journey – it’s as green as it’s gonna get here. Take your dinner date to the next level as we round up the best al fresco restaurants with killer views – it's worth heading out, even under our balmy summer weather.    All work and no play? Pamper yourself this month with a facial. From treatments for the time-strapped to an indulgent facial, we list the best ones in town to tackle all your skin problems.    Finally, gather the little ones and hit up National Gallery's Children's Biennale. We got a kiasu mum to share the highlights of this kid-friendly art festival that explodes with colour, light and sound.    Get the digital edition here, or subscribe to the magazine and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

In the June issue of Time Out Singapore: Seriously good shops

In the June issue of Time Out Singapore: Seriously good shops

With so many big brands churning out new products as quickly and recklessly as we throw old ones away, perhaps it’s time for a rethink of our shopping habits. What about, instead of chasing trends, spending cash on things that are meant to, y’know, last? Or buying second-hand or simply making something yourself?  In this issue, you’ll find shops – both online and physical – that deal in socially responsible goods, vintage clothes, organic groceries, second-hand books and more. Here’s to not refreshing your wardrobe every two months.      Craving for some dim sum? Then you're in luck. We've scoured the entire city to bring you a list of restaurants where you can find the best ones. And what's a shopping issue without some splurging? Splash your cash on these local wellness brands and pamper yourself with quality skincare and makeup products. Also, here's something to check out this month. National Gallery Singapore's latest art exhibition, Life is the Heart of a Rainbow, presents the psychedelic works of iconic Japanese luminary Yayoi Kusama. We delve into her surreal and colorful world with four works to look out for. Get the digital edition here, or subscribe to the magazine and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

In the May issue of Time Out Singapore: The best places for kids

In the May issue of Time Out Singapore: The best places for kids

‘Kids these days’ is a phrase I thought I’d never use. But kids these days are extremely fortunate. They can suit up in the latest fashion trends, bound around in massive playgrounds, chow down on food prepared by acclaimed chefs, even try out a new hobby or craft – Singapore is pretty much paradise for those with young ’uns. (Even though there aren’t that many around.) We’ve combed the island for stores, play centres, restaurants and workshops that are perfect for the children – and their parents. Find them all here, and then try to stop yourself from muttering, ‘Kids these days…’ Parents, are you looking for a restaurant where you can settle down with the young ones without them throwing a tantrum? Fear not, we've picked out the best child-friendly joints to bring the tykes for a fuss-free meal. Also in this issue, we check out the best gyms around town to get you in shape. From the ones best for express workouts to best for barbell lovers, we've got you covered.  And with the school holidays just around the corner, here's where to take the fam out other than to the parks or playgrounds. Sign up for one of these behind-the-scenes tours at your favourite attractions.  Get the digital edition here, or subscribe to the magazine and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

In the April issue of Time Out Singapore: The best places for local dishes

In the April issue of Time Out Singapore: The best places for local dishes

Which is the best laksa in Singapore? Or chicken rice, char kway teow and chilli crab? Questions like these are loaded, poignant and so hotly debated among locals they’re pretty much philosophical. So we called a symposium. We asked our readers what their favourite local dishes are and where we could find them, and then we ate our way across the island to try them all. I can’t say I agree with the majority (328 Katong Laksa, seriously?), but, hey – in most cases the popular votes do matter. We round up what Singaporeans love eating, where to find them, and what it's like to be in a hawker's boots.  Of course, what's a meal without some desserts? Complete yours with our list of the best local sweet treats.  Ever wondered what it's like to have a personal shopper? In this issue, we find out. From high-street brands like Zara to Club 21, we try out these styling services and got our wardrobe sorted.  And if you're planning a staycation sometime soon, look this way. We checked in to various boutique hotels around the island to let you know which ones are worth checking out.  Get the digital edition here, or subscribe to the magazine and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

In the March issue of Time Out Singapore: The best home decor and furniture stores

In the March issue of Time Out Singapore: The best home decor and furniture stores

      Like most Singaporeans, I only moved out of my parents’ place a few years after I got my first ‘real’ job. And I realised that dealing with rent, disadvantageous leasing terms and a money-grabbing mercenary for a landlord was the easy bit. Making the apartment feel like home, on the other hand, wasn’t. Because when IKEA and MUJI don’t make the cut, where else do I go?    In this issue, we'll answer that for you – with everything from designer furniture stores to homeware boutiques to second-hand outlets. We also round up the best men's groom room for all you gents to check into.      Prime your livers, everybody. Singapore Cocktail Festival is shaking things up by serving a whole week of – what else – cocktails. Look forward to the most bizarre concoctions that'll be making an appearance at the event. Sambal in your drink, anyone? And if you're in need of a quick brow fix, look this way. Whether you're after on-point eyebrows or fluttery, Bambi-like lashes, these salons will sort that out for you. Head to Marina Bay this month for the return of i Light. This year's edition features 20 sustainably made art installations and three curated fun zones, including a Silent Disco pop-up. Check out our guide to ensure you don't miss a thing.   In art, go back in time to discover ancient Myanmar at Asian Civilisations Museum's latest exhibition Cities and Kings (ends Mar 5). We break things down and take you on a tour of tales yet untold.  Get the digital edition here, or s

Find love in the city in our February issue

Find love in the city in our February issue

The first time I fell in love was on August 27, 1992. I remember how beautiful she looked: pink dress, gold tiara, sapphire brooch, long white gloves and flowing blonde locks. She giggled at my silly red hat, favourite blue overalls, and my unusual fondness for mushrooms. But my mum told me it’d never work out with her. Ah, well. We’ll always have Bowser’s fortress, Princess Peach. I have to say, though, that rescuing princesses from castles ruled by evil reptilian lords isn’t that far off from dating in real life. After all, love is a game we play, eh? And to win at it, you’ve just gotta try and try and try again. Or use a cheat code. So we’ve put together our ‘cheats’ to dating in Singapore: the best first-date restaurants, hush-hush make out spots, ideas for couples who are either fresh in a relationship or stuck in a rut. We’ve even set two pairs of our readers up and sent them off to see if sparks fly.  Not sure what flowers to get for your significant other? Men, we've created a cheat sheet of bouquets so you don't mix up your succulent with your hydrangeas. Happy Valentine’s Day, folks!   And let's not forget the Oscars at the end of this month. Will Leonardo DiCaprio finally win one of those shiny gold bald men? Read our interview with the actor on making ambitious movies, his work ethic and the gruelling shoot for The Revenant.  Chinese New Year's just 'round the corner, too. Toss your way to good fortune with these next-level yu sheng creations, including those t

In the February issue of Time Out Singapore: Treat yo'self

In the February issue of Time Out Singapore: Treat yo'self

      It’s February, which means that for most of us, those New Year resolutions have already been flung out the window. It’s all good. We’re much bigger fans of treating ourselves, anyway. And since it’s the month when everyone’s suddenly in the mood for love, there’s no better time to splash that cash on yourself – and maybe someone special.  But before whipping out your credit card like the debt-totin’ cowboy you are, you best know where to make the most of your dollar. Check out our picks of the city’s top date restaurants, couple spas, desserts and the most luxurious experiences money can buy. Go wild, people.         And we can't think of a better way to #treatyoself other than sinking your teeth into delicious desserts. From Instagrammable popsicles to drool-worthy chocolate soufflés, you better save some stomach space for these sinful treats.             Planning to surprise your special someone with a staycation this V-day? Here's one to check into. We peek into The Warehouse Hotel, the city's newest boutique hotel, which features a rooftop infinity pool, a lobby bar and rooms with a view.             But that's not all – also in this issue, we sit down with local beat maker Louis Quek, aka Intriguant, to discuss his debut album Recluse. And if you're looking to get your music fix, we've got you covered with our list of concerts and gigs to attend this February.    Get the digital edition here, or subscribe to the magazine and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and

In the January issue of Time Out Singapore: Upgrade your life

In the January issue of Time Out Singapore: Upgrade your life

And hello, 2017. Let’s hope you won’t be as crazy as the last one. But no matter – we’ll start the year on a high, anyway. Beginning, of course, with the revamped issue of Time Out Singapore, available now at all major bookstores. Since we’ve got that shameless self-promotion bit out of the way, on to the more important stuff: how to make good on your New Year’s resolutions. Honestly, I’m pretty awesome at keeping mine. Drink more beer? Check. Eat more fried chicken? Done. Spend more money on frivolous things? Pfft, this is way too easy. But if you’re not as cavalier with your calories, then you’ll have lots to check out in this issue.The best places to eat clean, bootcamps to up your fitness game, workshops to learn a new craft… Now excuse me while I grab another beer from the bar. What's a new year without new nails? The team got their nails and toes painted pretty at the city's top nail salons. From manicures to pedicures, and nail art to foot spas, we got you covered. Just in time for Chinese New Year, too. If this is the year you plan to work out of the office, or you're done working from home, we roundup the best co-working spaces around town to get your productivity on.  Also in this month's issue, time to tap into your artistic side and check out the many exhibitions as part of Singapore Art Week and the performances at M1 Singapore Fringe Festival. Happy 2017! Get the digital edition here, or subscribe to the magazine and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Inst

Bencoolen Street goes car-lite

Bencoolen Street goes car-lite

Make your way to Bencoolen Street now and you’ll be greeted by lumbering heavy machinery within a maze of traffic cones and hoarding. It’s chaos. Thankfully, once construction of Bencoolen MRT station is completed, by the first quarter of 2017, the area will flourish into a green thoroughfare perfect for pedestrians and cyclists. It’s all part of the Land Transport Authority’s (LTA) efforts to ‘create a more conducive and pleasant environment for people to walk, cycle and ride public transport’. The redesigned street will accommodate plenty of car-lite considerations. Wide footpaths will be lined with greenery and benches, the latter designed by students and alumni from the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts, while sheltered linkways will connect Bencoolen MRT station to hotspots in the vicinity. A cycling lane will bridge Bencoolen Street to Rochor Canal and, once the North-South Corridor is completed, even to the CBD. Cyclists will also benefit from about 125 lots scattered across the road to park their two-wheelers. And finally, to quicken and smoothen public transportation in the neighbourhood, the LTA is also carving out a dedicated bus lane along the street. It all sounds pretty damn good, if you ask us. The revamped Bencoolen Street will be completed by the first quarter of 2017.

Give back to the community by tucking into an Italian meal

Give back to the community by tucking into an Italian meal

Jamie’s Italian is one of the city’s kid-friendliest restaurants, and it’s taking that one step higher this Christmas season. For every kids’ meal you order at either its VivoCity or Orchard outlet until the end of the year, the restaurant will donate $1 to the Singapore Children’s Society. The target? To raise $20,000. To amp up the donations, Jamie’s Italian has also launched a fundraising campaign, and it’s compiling a wish list from the underprivileged children of Sunbeam Place that, hopefully, we’ll all be able to help out with. And on December 13, a group of 30 of these children will be invited to Jamie’s Italian at VivoCity for a day of Christmas cheer. So remember, folks: it’s the season of giving – not taking. The Jamie’s Italian giving season ends on Dec 31.