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Marc Rowlands

Marc Rowlands

Articles (98)

The 71 best things to do in Zagreb

The 71 best things to do in Zagreb

Compact and easy to navigate, Zagreb contains plenty of historic sights and fascinating galleries, complemented by destination restaurants, clusters of busy bars and numerous live-music venues. The main square divides the hilly Upper Town – museums, institutions of national importance, panoramic views – from the flat, grid-patterned streets of the Lower Town, with its gastronomic landmarks, designer boutiques and art galleries. Spread out east and west are areas of bucolic greenery while south over the Sava river stretches the post-war residential blocks of Novi Zagreb. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere. You can also find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world, or take a look at our list of the 50 best things to do in the world right now.

The best beer gardens in Zagreb

The best beer gardens in Zagreb

When sunshine hits the city, there’s no better place to sip your drink than an outdoor beer garden. The term is rarely used in Croatia: al-fresco drinking spots are usually called a terrace (and a beer garden is not just a terrace). But that doesn’t mean you can’t find a shaded, leafy beer garden to escape to on a swelteringly hot day. Although some of these venues push the boundaries of what elsewhere might be considered a beer garden, each provides a nicely secluded retreat from the heat and bustle of the city centre. RECOMMENDED: Find more great bars in Zagreb

The top 10 things to do in Omiš

The top 10 things to do in Omiš

SSo many curses have been aired at the town of Omiš over the years it's a wonder the air hasn't turned as blue as its turquoise waters and cloudless skies. Before the motorway eased pressure from the coastal road, the magistrala, Omiš was a regular point of congestion. Going back even further, the pirates who once used the town as their base provoked the ire of many regimes that controlled the surrounding seas. The town has come into its own as a tourist destination later than much of the Dalmatian coast, its countless kilometres of uncramped beaches and unique options afforded by its position on the Cetina river helping to do so. Here are the best things to do in Omiš.  Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere You can also find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world, or take a look at our list of the 50 best things to do in the world right now RECOMMENDED: 20 great things to do in Makarska

The 20 best things to do in Baška Voda

The 20 best things to do in Baška Voda

A relatively small and quiet Dalmatian town, sat aside the sea on one of the prettiest stretches of the Makarska riviera, Baška Voda has many beautiful beaches and a relaxed atmosphere that's perfect for families. It also has many great things to do; we've checked them out for you.   Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere You can also find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world, or take a look at our list of the 50 best things to do in the world right now RECOMMENDED: 20 great things to do in Makarska

Great sports events in Croatia to help you get in shape

Great sports events in Croatia to help you get in shape

Sports events are something of a national preoccupation in Croatia. Most eyes in the country will be fixed to the TV screens when the national teams compete in football, handball, basketball and waterpolo. But, for a very large number of Croatians, it's simply not enough to just be a spectator, especially not with long summers always just on the horizon and when you have thousands of kilometres of beautiful beaches demanding your near-naked attendance. Of course, any time is right to start getting into shape, but Croatians make a concerted effort to do so in autumn, winter and early spring, before it becomes too hot for strenuous exercise. And they're extremely welcoming to visitors and foreign nationals who want to join in. From the parks and neighbourhoods of Zagreb to the beautifully varied landscape of rural and coastal Istria and the flat terrain of Slavonia and Srijem, perfect for cycling and road races, here are some of the best events of the year in which you can.RECOMMENDED: Great things to do in Croatia this winter

The 10 best things to do in Gradac

The 10 best things to do in Gradac

A beautiful seaside town, perched right on the edge of the Adriatic, Gradac has been welcoming visitors for centuries. Accustomed to such visitors, it is now a justly popular tourist destination. Gradac is the centre of a namesake municipality comprised of five settlements - Brist, Drvenik, Gradac, Podaca and Zaostrog. The southernmost municipality in Split-Dalmatia County, it lies 40 kilometres south of Makarska and just over 100 kilometres north of Dubrovnik. It is famed for its mouth-watering presentation of sumptuous Mediterranean cuisine, pristine waters for swimming and some of the best beaches in Dalmatia to soak up the sun. Here are the best things to do while visiting Gradac.  Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere You can also find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world, or take a look at our list of the 50 best things to do in the world right now RECOMMENDED: The 20 best things to do in Makarska

The 10 best things to do in Zaton near Dubrovnik

The 10 best things to do in Zaton near Dubrovnik

Not to be confused with two namesake villages near Zadar and Šibenik, Zaton near Dubrovnik is a perfectly positioned oasis of calm and tradition that makes for a great kick-off for exploring the neighbouring city and nearby islands. The coastal town has a picturesque bay comprised of Mali Zaton and Zaton proper, its shoreline dotted with taverns offering traditional fare, plus plenty of places where you can take a dip. It's also a good base for day trips to cities like Split or even to hop across the nearby borders into Montenegro or Bosnia and Herzegovina. Here's our pick of the best things to do in Zaton near Dubrovnik. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere You can also find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world, or take a look at our list of the 50 best things to do in the world right now RECOMMENDED: The best things to do in Dubrovnik

The best Zagreb bars

The best Zagreb bars

People in Croatia's capital city always give themselves time to linger and socialise over drinks. Whatever the time of year, new Zagreb bars are always raising and lowering their banners across the city centre and beyond, while traditional landmarks stay firm. Time Out's experts discover the best places to sip across town.

The 10 best things to do in Vodice

The 10 best things to do in Vodice

Buzzing with nightlife and beach fun, for its relatively small size Vodice punches above its weight and is packed full of great things to do. Located 60 kilometres south of Zadar and just 10 kilometres from Šibenik, with great access to the rest of Dalmatia and its national parks, it’s a popular summertime destination for both families and a younger crowd. Vodice centres around beach and bar life, with late nights on the menu. Whether you choose to spend them in some of the town’s seafront restaurants, spirited nightclubs or at some of the world-famous music festivals that take place in nearby Tisno, is up to you. Here's a rundown of the best things to do in Vodice. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere You can also find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world, or take a look at our list of the 50 best things to do in the world right now RECOMMENDED: 20 great things to do in Šibenik

20 great things to do on Vis island

20 great things to do on Vis island

The remote, rocky island of Vis has ended its years of isolation and the tourists it now welcomes seek a different, more authentic experience than elsewhere in Dalmatia. Yachters and Hollywood stars might mingle around the marina, but you can easily find your own slice of paradise away from the clicking paparazzi. Secluded beaches, sunlit caves and succulent lobster make the longer crossing from Split well worth the occasionally choppy journey. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere You can also find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world, or take a look at our list of the 50 best things to do in the world right now RECOMMENDED: More great travel destinations in Croatia  

Ten fabulously free things to do in Dubrovnik

Ten fabulously free things to do in Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik is Croatia's most photographed city and welcomes armies of tourists every day. You won't be able to walk the famous city walls without spending some dosh, and most attractions will have you parting with a handful of coins. While you'll probably conclude that these inimitable sights are worth every penny, you can easily give the spending a break - Dubrovnik's free attractions are some of its finest. Here are some wonderful free things to do in Dubrovnik. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere You can also find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world, or take a look at our list of the 50 best things to do in the world right now RECOMMENDED: more great things to do in Dubrovnik

A captain's advice to sailing in Croatia

A captain's advice to sailing in Croatia

Mark Russell is a captain with over two decades of experience at sea. He has sailed the waters in and around Croatia many times. He is a dual UK and USA citizen and enjoyed many years as a recreational sailor. He completed a degree in Marine Biology and was formerly a professional diver and diving instructor. He began working on luxury yachts as a diving operations manager, then as a crew member and now takes the helm as captain.Mark RussellI've been working on Luxury Private Charter boats for over 12 years now, but I've been at sea for more like 20. I know pretty well the route from Budva, Tivat and Kotor in Montenegro, up to Trogir and Split in Croatia, taking in Korcula, Miljet, Hvar.Mljet National Park Mlijet is lovely, a national park. It's nice and quiet. Hvar is really a party place, but the advantage of seeing it by boat is that it also has lovely little islands close by and they're nice. Korcula is one of my own favourite spots, a stunningly well preserved Venetian town. It's great for kitesurfing there, they have some strong winds there, sometimes dangerously strong actually. You can find some really, really good white wines all around there. Trogir is absolutely beautiful, for me the best-preserved medieval city in Europe. It's also very close to the airport, so it's easy to travel at the start or end of any sailing trip. Split is also beautifully well preserved, but obviously a great deal bigger. There's quite a lot going on there. Dubrovnik is great to see, both

News (99)

PHOTOS: Zagreb residents reclaim their city

PHOTOS: Zagreb residents reclaim their city

Friday marks the start of another weekend of relative freedom. Liberated by the relaxed rules for social distancing, our new normal provides us with another opportunity to appreciate some of the many things we once took for granted. The ability to congregate, socialise and to interact - not so long ago perhaps less appreciated than our handy mobile phone apps - are now rightly valued as never before. And nowhere is this re-evaluation of freedoms more visible than downtown Zagreb, on the Square of the Croatian Republic, just outside the Croatian National Theatre.   © Marc Rowlands     © David Bakarić     © David Bakarić     © David Bakarić   Since guidelines changed, this grandiose focal point in the heart of the Croatian capital has been the site of a new youth phenomenon. What was formerly a spot for a small number of students has become the de facto meeting place for the city's young residents. The small alternative cabal has grown to embrace every type of peer group imaginable; sports students, football fans, young patriots, LGBT teens and devout Christians sit beside punks, rockers, bohemian musicians and ravers. Everyone gets along. There are no special seats, no VIP room that the privileged can pay for. They sit on the floor, some dance, they play cards, drums, guitars and violins. Most of all, they smile, enjoy and talk above the sound of several small, competing soundsystems.   © Marc Rowlands     © David Bakarić     © David Bakarić     © David Bakarić

Save your tears for the cathedral, its promise is a greater symbol of Zagreb than its towers

Save your tears for the cathedral, its promise is a greater symbol of Zagreb than its towers

On Friday 17 April 2020, residents watched from around the city centre as military personnel conducted a controlled explosion on a tower belonging to Zagreb cathedral. Damaged in the recent earthquake, the upper section of the spire had stood precariously off-kilter and was judged to be a public health hazard. As dust from the explosion dispersed, so did the people, their spirits lowered just like the tower top of this pre-eminent city symbol. But, such sorrow is misplaced. For it is not only in the tallest part of this building where believers find faith. Nor is it simply the height and adornments of the cathedral which make it an emblem for all who live here. Zagreb is a resilient city, steadfast and strong. To inextricably link this city's spirit and its great symbol to such irrelevant ornamentation does both a disservice. Zagreb is greater than that. And, its greatest landmark means so much more. Zagreb cathedral or, to give it its full title, Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saints Stephen and Ladislav, has become such an icon for its city partially because it can be seen from so many Zagreb neighbourhoods. These days it presides reassuringly over the cityscape, but it does so in a manner that would be most unfamiliar to past residents.   Artist's impression of Zagreb's cathedral© State Archives in Zagreb   The cathedral's history can be traced back to 1093, when King Ladislav founded the Diocese of Zagreb, promoting an existing church to the

United in diversity: Europe Day 2020

United in diversity: Europe Day 2020

National flags fluttered in the breeze on thousands of streets yesterday as many celebrated VE (Victory in Europe) Day. Though the sacrifice of soldiers in the Second World War and the freedom they helped enable is rightly not forgotten, not everyone is entirely comfortable seeing such symbols. Nor can everyone join in. Celebrations under a national banner limit who you can invite to the party and while remembrance has its place, more optimism and immediate relevance can be achieved by celebrating the future. Europe Day is marked by members of the European Union every May 9th. Its first recognition came in 1964 and signified co-operation and togetherness. More so than at any time since, such togetherness is needed. Bereft of any national symbols, Europe Day is not attached to loss of life, violent struggle, sad remembrance nor isolationist pride. Instead, it speaks of shared interest and integration, of the things we hold in common rather than that which divides us.   © Bogdan Giuşcă   Europe Day was originally celebrated on May 5th, the founding day of the Council of Europe. It was adopted by the European Communities (the predecessor to the EU) in 1985 and set as May 9th in commemoration of the 1950 Schuman Declaration. This declaration proposed the pooling of France and West Germany's coal and steel industries, thus creating in 1952 the European Coal and Steel Community, the first of the European Communities. The reassigning of the day has been integral to its success, re

Zagreb's Lisinski Concert Hall begins 24/7 outdoor music programme

Zagreb's Lisinski Concert Hall begins 24/7 outdoor music programme

Concert goers may not currently be able to go and watch their favourite performers, but Zagreb's renowned Lisinski Concert Hall believes that doesn't mean we have to go without their music. From today, the venue started serenading neighbouring streets with a new soundtrack. The music will be played 24-hours a day, seven days a week, until performances at the venue resume.Lisinski Concert Hall has been hosting concerts of every musical genre for almost 50 years. Well known for showcasing world-standard classical music and ballet, they have also welcomed international stars of rock, jazz and pop music. The new musical programme - which can be heard coming from Lisinski's sound system all around the hall, on Vukovarska and Trg Stjepan Radić - is comprised of past guests to the venue, such as the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Pat Metheny Group and the Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra.    © Borislav Marinic  

VIDEO: Croatia's rich cultural offer

VIDEO: Croatia's rich cultural offer

From well-preserved Roman remains in Pula and Split and the grandiose Hapsburg architecture of Zagreb and Rijeka to the traditional lace makers of Pag and the folklore societies of continental regions, Croatia is a country with culture that can often leave you breathless. You can catch a glimpse of some highlights in the latest video in a series from the Croatian National Tourist Board.The team at #Croatiafulloflife launched a new campaign in late April 2020 inviting you to welcome Croatia into your homes. The videos show some of the country's most-appealing aspects and are intended to inspire future visitors at a time when they themselves cannot currently receive Croatia's famous welcome. The first video in the #CroatiaLongDistanceLove campaign has already received 1.5 million views with the second, showcasing the country's nature and natural assets, released just last week. Take a look at this latest video, which focusses on the country's diverse, fascinating and visually exciting culture.  

VIDEO: The incredible nature and natural assets of Croatia

VIDEO: The incredible nature and natural assets of Croatia

From the waterfalls and lakes of National Parks like Plitvice and Krka and the mountainous region of Lika to the thousand diverse islands and fertile flatlands between the Sava and Drava rivers, Croatia is a country with incredible nature and natural assets. These are just some of the unforgettable landscapes showcased in this new video by the Croatian National Tourist Board.The team at #Croatiafulloflife launched a new campaign in late April 2020 inviting you to welcome Croatia into your homes. A series of videos showing some of the country's most-appealing aspects is intended to inspire future visitors at a time when they themselves cannot currently receive Croatia's famous welcome. The first video in the #CroatiaLongDistanceLove campaign has already received 1.5 million views. Take a look at the latest video, which focusses on the country's wondrous nature and natural assets.

Karlovac comes alive with colourful new murals

Karlovac comes alive with colourful new murals

The city of Karlovac has come alive with the installation of the latest in a string of colourful new murals. This latest mural, by artist Leonard Lesić, can be seen on the side of the city's Hrvatski dom building. It marks the start of a bold new redesign and repurposing of the formerly neglected building.   © Leonard Lesić   The artwork was commissioned via competition by KAoperativa Alliance, a network of NGOs from Karlovac who are collaborating to renovate the building. Originally built in 1926 and a centre for arts, recreation, culture and community. It now requires some work intended to return the building to its original purpose.   Architects design of how the completed Hrvatski dom Karlovac and its urban park will look once complete © Anamarija Popovački, Nikolina Delić, Luka Krmpotić, Luka Lipšinić, Iva Žaja   Around 20 artists submitted designs for the wall, with the jury choosing one by Leonard Lesić, who is from nearby Duga Resa, as the winner. His mural measures 28 metres by 4 metres. The mural sits above an open space which is about to undergo landscaping which will turn it into an urban park. In warmer months, the park will be used for exhibitions, workshops, performances and community activities.   Leonard Lesić mural in Duga Resa © Leonard Lesić   'I chose to make the mural using bright colours, so they would contrast with the surroundings,' artist Leonard Lesić told Time Out Croatia. 'There's quite a lot of greenery and nature near the building. Also be

VIDEO: Man United legend Ryan Giggs sends message to Zagreb fan

VIDEO: Man United legend Ryan Giggs sends message to Zagreb fan

Manchester United legend Ryan Giggs has recorded a video message for one Zagreb-based fan and the city. In the video, Giggs, who is currently manager of the Wales National Football Team, congratulates young Ante Perković, aged 15, for trying to raise money for a Zagreb children's hospital which was damaged recently in the earthquake. Ante met Ryan Giggs when the former United left-winger visited the city in 2016. He was lucky enough to get a signed football from Ryan. But, Ante had recently joined a money-raising effort for the children's hospital in Petrova street and put his beloved ball up for auction. Such a selfless initiative captured the hearts of football fans around Croatia. Fans bid in the auction and paid 187 thousand kuna (£22, 000) for the ball, but on the condition that it should be returned to Ante. The fundraising initiative was started several weeks ago by fans of Dinamo Zagreb football club (Dinamo to smo mi). It was their fans who were among the first responders at the Petrova hospital following the earthquake, where they helped evacuate the youngest children from the maternity ward. This section of the hospital and much of its equipment had been seriously damaged. The money-raising scheme Vratimo Palčiće u Petrovu now has a popular Facebook page. Football fans from all over Croatia have put partisan support aside in order to join the initiative and help out. Football shirts - many signed, rare or vintage - plus footballs and othe

PHOTOS: Highlights of Rovinj Photodays 2020

PHOTOS: Highlights of Rovinj Photodays 2020

Having now reached 13 years of age, Rovinj Photodays has established itself as one of Croatia's key annual happenings for photography. As it should be, for the festival is the largest and most comprehensive event of its kind in Southeast Europe. The festival is currently taking place. Both winners and runners-up in all categories have been announced. But, acting under advisement, the event has only made itself available to the public online. We present here some of the highlights.   Winner in Portrait category 2020© Patrick Bienert     Winner in Documentary category 2020© Alessio Paduano     Second place in Documentary category 2020© Nik Erik Neubauer     Winner in Fashion category 2020© Patrick Bienert   The festival was founded in 2008 and entries for its competition aspect are submitted from all over the world. This year, a total of 2600 photographs by authors from 18 countries were put forward for consideration. Among the finalists were two photographers each from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Italy, Russia and Serbia. Photographers from the Netherlands, Germany and Slovenia also reached the final.   Winner in Architecture category 2020© Fadil Šarki     Winner in Portrait category 2020© Patrick Bienert     Second place in Architecture category 2020© Ivana Jagušić     Winner in Portrait category 2020© Patrick Bienert   2020's competition categories were: Nudy/Body, Architecture, Fashion, Documentary, Landscape and Portrait. The work of successful finalis

Photos + video: New murals explode onto the walls of Zagreb park

Photos + video: New murals explode onto the walls of Zagreb park

While most of Zagreb has been on extended hibernation, an explosion of life and colour has appeared in one quiet corner of the city centre. During the lockdown, new murals have been painted by some of the city's most active street artists.   © Ernest Mazarekić / Art Park / Zagreb Tourist Board         © Ernest Mazarekić / Art Park / Zagreb Tourist Board       © Ernest Mazarekić / Art Park / Zagreb Tourist Board     The paintings adorn the walls of the small Opatovina park. Although it is situated between the popular visitor routes of Tkalčićeva and Opatovina ulica, the park is frequently missed by tourists. A remnant of the oldest section of Zagreb, the upper town park is much loved by city residents who use it as a bolthole of calm away from the bustling streets in the centre. The new murals offer a perfect excuse for visitors to seek out the park for themselves.   © Ernest Mazarekić / Art Park / Zagreb Tourist Board       © Ernest Mazarekić / Art Park / Zagreb Tourist Board       © Ernest Mazarekić / Art Park / Zagreb Tourist Board     The new works were commissioned by Zagreb Tourist Board from the Art Park organisation who, over recent years, have held summer-long projects that construct alfresco socialising areas centred around the painting of new graffiti works.   © Ernest Mazarekić / Art Park / Zagreb Tourist Board       © Ernest Mazarekić / Art Park / Zagreb Tourist Board       © Ernest Mazarekić / Art Park / Zagreb Tourist Board     Joining the exi

LADO: a people's history

LADO: a people's history

When dancers from the professional Slovakian folk art ensemble Sl'uk hit the stage of the Croatian National Theatre in Zagreb last September, not all of the comfortably-seated audience could have known what was in store for them. Renowned for their acrobatic and zealous performances, the Slovaks wheeled through the air, mirroring the celebratory movements practised by their forebears at joyous social gatherings in years gone by.    © LADO   Such a wild and physical show stood in sharp contrast to the pristine and subtly-executed ballet and bombastically-accentuated opera usually found on this grandest of Croatian stages. It also stood in contrast to their partners of the evening, LADO, the Croatian National Folk Dance Association, whose own introduction to the stage saw them slowly mimic the toil of agricultural workers accompanied by a heartfelt chant of multiple harmonies. Comparatively, this wasn't the most explosive or dramatic of entrances to have happened on this stage. But, that is not what LADO is about. When the members of LADO take the stage, they are not the supernatural figures of ballet nor the overwrought characters of opera. They are you. They are us. They are the people of Croatia and their ancestors, their performances offering an honest insight into the everyday lives, festivities and diverse, enduring traditions of past centuries.   © LADO   The style of dance on display that September evening was not the only aspect separating Croatia's LADO from their

Slavonian man improves relations with wife by moving into a tent

Slavonian man improves relations with wife by moving into a tent

In these unprecedented times, people are finding different ways to cope. In news reported today by the SiB.hr news portal, one man's solution to being stuck inside with his wife has been to move out of the house and into a nearby tent. Speaking anonymously, the man's neighbour told the portal the couple have been happily married for 30 years. But, it seems the pressure of being around each other so closely during the social lockdown was too much, even for such a strong union. The relationship had become frayed. Since the man pitched his tent in the nearby locale, the neighbour was happy to report that relations between the man and his wife have returned to their usual excellent and friendly standards. "My neighbour has been in his tent for a few days now,” he told the portal. “He puts up a table and chairs in front. Occasionally our other neighbour comes over to drink some rakija (with him). I visited him too.” The neighbour reported that the man put his decision to quit the home down to boredom more than anything else. Even after being together happily for 30 years of marriage, to be around each other 24 hours a day was apparently just too much. The neighbour begged the portal not to reveal the exact name of the village where they live in order to maintain a peaceful neighbourly atmosphere, but it is in the surroundings of the Slavonian capital, Osijek.RECOMMENDED: Brighten your day by checking out the rest of Time Out Croatia's latest news here

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